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Need some info regarding changing, adding or taking away prayers in the Mass (NO).  According to a letter I received from a friend the priest now says tthat the adoration we say after each Consecration of the Sacred Species is "O come let us adore Him" not "My Lord and My God."  I'm looking for the citation -- Canon law or even from the V-II conciliar documents.  Thanks.

Added:  Or is any other personal adoration permitted as long as it is devout?
(08-11-2013, 07:25 PM)dark lancer Wrote: [ -> ]http://old.usccb.org/romanmissal/peoplesparts.pdf

Thanks but not the answer to my question.  Where in the Church documents on the Liturgy does it say that the priest is not at liberty to change, alter, add, subtract, etc., anything from the Mass?  "My Lord and My God" has been the constant words of adoration upon the elevation of the Host and of the Chalice.  Why change it?
(08-12-2013, 04:03 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-11-2013, 07:25 PM)dark lancer Wrote: [ -> ]http://old.usccb.org/romanmissal/peoplesparts.pdf

Thanks but not the answer to my question.  Where in the Church documents on the Liturgy does it say that the priest is not at liberty to change, alter, add, subtract, etc., anything from the Mass?   "My Lord and My God" has been the constant words of adoration upon the elevation of the Host and of the Chalice.  Why change it?

Vincentius, I'll have to do some research, but I know there is a document that absolutely prohibits a priest from ' chang(ing), alter(ing), add(ing), subtract(ing), etc...' In other words, it's the law to 'Read the Black and Do the Red'.
(08-12-2013, 05:03 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-12-2013, 04:03 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-11-2013, 07:25 PM)dark lancer Wrote: [ -> ]http://old.usccb.org/romanmissal/peoplesparts.pdf

Thanks but not the answer to my question.  Where in the Church documents on the Liturgy does it say that the priest is not at liberty to change, alter, add, subtract, etc., anything from the Mass?   "My Lord and My God" has been the constant words of adoration upon the elevation of the Host and of the Chalice.  Why change it?

Vincentius, I'll have to do some research, but I know there is a document that absolutely prohibits a priest from ' chang(ing), alter(ing), add(ing), subtract(ing), etc...' In other words, it's the law to 'Read the Black and Do the Red'.

Precisely, Jovan.  I have come across it many times but now it seems to elude me.  Thanks for your help!  We have so much ad libbing in the NO, the Mass differs from Church to church.  However, there are also rermisses in the Tridentine but but very rare.  I once attended a TLM where the priest forgot to Consecrate the Chalice (no elevation) and went on to give Communion.  Another priest prayed the Canon in a loud voice novus ordo way.  Such remissions are prohibited in the De Defectibus.  Also at another TLM where the Host fell to floor,  the priest did not bother to do the rubrics or proper procedure to purify in such cases.  But these are very very rare cases, never seen at SSPX, FSSP, ICK Masses.  They are from the Indult which gave old priests the celebret.
(08-12-2013, 05:28 AM)Vincentius Wrote: [ -> ]We have so much ad libbing in the NO, the Mass differs from Church to church. 

How true! In almost 35 years as a Catholic, attending the NO when I couldn't find or get to a DL or TLM (which was most of the time!), I've only seen ONE Mass celebrated strictly according to the Law, the Missal and the Rubrics and that was in the Diocese of Lincoln, NE. When I mentioned it after Mass, the Priest told me, 'You could have gone anywhere in the Diocese. We just do it by the book.'! His Lordship Flavian Bruskewitz was Ordinary at the time, building on the great work His Lordship Glennon Flavin had done in his 25 years as Ordinary.

***ETA***I should add that the overwhelming violations of the Law, the Missal, and the Rubrics have been extremely minor. 'Pray my brothers and sisters' instead of 'pray brethren' and that sort of thing. I've never seen a clown Mass and I've only been subjected to so-called 'Liturgical Dance' once in all those years, Deo gratias!
Father Zuhlsdorf's column might help: "First, one of the reasons why priests and bishops don’t follow the norms is because with the Novus Ordo, there was no longer in the norms published in the missal itself, in the forward or praenotanda, the stern reminder that certain serious faults and flaws in celebration of Mass were mortal sins.
Rubrics and their implications are a matter of moral theology.  The older, pre-Conciliar missal is clear that when a priest violates some points of the rubrics, he commits a sin.
When sin was detached from observance of the norms, priests and bishops – who often have pride problems like everyone else – were off the leash."

http://wdtprs.com/blog/2013/02/why-dont-...lly-rants/
Is this supposed to be rubrics for the people? People don't have rubrics. From what I understand, My Lord and My God is totally optional.
(08-12-2013, 05:39 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]Is this supposed to be rubrics for the people? People don't have rubrics. From what I understand, My Lord and My God is totally optional.

Optional?  You mean when the priest raises the Host and then the Chalice, isn't that an act that this rubric requires a response of adoration?    How do we express our adoration, pay honor and reverent homage?  Just stare and say nothing?  If the congregation is not taught that adoration of the True Presence requires nothing in particular is probably why many do not bother to go to Mass or are there to go to Communion because everybody else does.

Everything that occurs in ecclesiastical service, not only in the Mass, is an action, a nuance, a reaction, a participation, in the service.  Genuflecting, kneeling, standing, responding to the prayers, is a rubric.  I would like to know your idea of "rubric" is.

[quote]This custom was adopted in liturgical collections to distinguish from the formulæ of the prayers the instructions and indications which should regulate their recitation, so that the word rubric has become the consecrated term for the rules concerning Divine service or the administration of the sacraments.

The word is used sometimes to indicate the general laws sometimes to mark a particular indication, but always to furnish an explanation of the use of the text, hence the saying: "Lege rubrum si vis intelligere nigrum" (read the red if you would understand the black). Thus in liturgical books the red characters indicate what should be done, the black what should be recited, and the Rubrics may be defined as: the rules laid down for the recitation of the Divine Office, the celebration of Mass, and the administration of the sacraments. In some respects the rubrics resemble ceremonies, but they differ inasmuch as the ceremonies are external attitudes, actions considered as accidental rites and movements, while the Rubrics bear on the essential rite ... distinguished between the rubrics of the Breviary, the Missal, and the Ritual, according as the matter regulated concerns the Divine Office, the Mass, or the sacraments; and again between essential and accidental rubrics according as they relate to what is of necessity or to external circumstances in the act which they regulate, etc. But the chief distinction seems to be that which divides them into general and particular rubrics. The first are the rules common to the same sacred function, e.g., those which regulate the recitation of the Divine Office, whether considered as a whole, in its chief parts, or in its secondary parts; they are at present printed under thirty-four titles in the editions of the Roman Breviary at the head of the part for autumn; those which regulate the celebration of Mass printed at the beginning of the Roman Missal (twenty titles containing the general rules, thirteen others giving the rite to be followed in the celebration, and ten others explaining the defects which may occur); those which regulate the administration of the sacraments (given by the Ritual at the beginning of each of the sacraments, as also by the Pontifical for the sacraments administered by a bishop). The particular rubrics are the special rules which determine during the course of the action what must be done at each period of the year, on certain fixed days, as the days of Holy Week, or when a particular formula is recited. They are inserted in the midst of the formulæ of Breviary, Missal, or Ritual.  -- from the C.E.)


Found the anwers to  my query.

See Sacrosanctum Concilium -- Constitution on the Liturgy of Pope Paul VI.

It's on Paragraph 22, under heading A) General Norms, Item No. 3. "Therefore no other person, if he be a priest may add, remove or change anything in the Liturgy on his own authority."  (We know that this is completely ignored).
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