FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Future Bishops and Popes: How Much Authority?
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
http://catholicexchange.com/171834/

Someone please explain this because my gut reaction to this isn't a good one.
The bishops were given too much authority at VII - imho. They don't need any more.
I think the beauracrats at the parish, diocesan and national levels in the church have more power than the Bishops.
I think that Pope Francis will be popular until he makes a Catholic decision that is politically unpopular and then you will see the media tide turn against him.
I'm bumping this because I'd like to see reaction about this part of the article.  Some of the comments below the article are also interesting.

Quote:The world Synod of Bishops, a Vatican II innovation, was intended as yet another instrument of collegiality. But although the synod has occupied an honorable place in ecclesial life for 40-plus years, its role so far has been confined to advising the pope on questions he selects rather than sharing in the actual making of decisions.

So where does collegiality go from here? Enter Pope Francis’ project and the maneuvering now underway.

In general terms, there currently are two different approaches on the table. One points to a large scale decentralization of authority, the other, as might be expected, toward dramatic centralization. Advocates of each cite the principle of collegiality as their rationale.

Under the decentralization model, diocesan bishops and, especially, national conferences of bishops would have much greater authority for decision-making than they do now.

Liberals tend to favor that. This is partly out of concern for collegiality and partly because they see it as a way to realize such long-sought goals of theirs as married priests, communion for the divorced and remarried, a more permissive approach to questions of sexual morality, and in the long run perhaps even the ordination of women.

By contrast, some conservatives favor more centralization–and, paradoxically, for the sake of the collegiality principle.

One such plan would call for the creation of a permanent, synod-like representative body in Rome, its members nominated by the world’s bishops and selected by the Pope. Acting in union with the pontiff, and never apart from him, it would have the power to make doctrinal and disciplinary decisions for the worldwide  Church. Its advantage is said to lie in being an authentic embodiment of collegiality that involves no diminution of papal primacy while responding to the need of the universal Church for speedy decision-making and unimpaired cohesiveness in an era of instantaneous communication and globalization.

From October 1 to 3 Pope Francis will meet for the first time with the special council of eight cardinals that he has established to advise him on these matters. (Cardinal Sean O’Malley, O.F.M. Cap., of Boston is one of the eight.) While this will be the group’s first face-to-face meeting, the Pope and the eight are presumed to have been in frequent contact and have already spent much time mulling ideas like those sketched here.

Catholics everywhere should be paying close attention. The results could be of huge importance for the future of the Church.

Like the OP, my own gut reaction is similarly cautious, on the side of skepticism. 

And how do people feel about O'Malley being among the 8 advisors?
This is scary in my opinion. I think good bishops will be further marginalized. Collegiality actually harmed bishops...it transferred authority to the novelty of permanent bishops' conferences. As someone else said here...the bearucats pull the strings now.

I'm also of the very pessimistic opinion that the majority of the bishops no longer have the Faith. Sorry.

As for Cardinal O'malley being among the advisors on this thing. Wasn't he the one who gave the mini-canonization funeral to Ted Kennedy? That says it all right there.

Get ready for more storms. Get ready for full blown out in the open schism.

Lord have mercy.
(08-25-2013, 03:16 PM)DustinsDad Wrote: [ -> ]This is scary in my opinion. I think good bishops will be further marginalized. Collegiality actually harmed bishops...it transferred authority to the novelty of permanent bishops' conferences. As someone else said here...the bearucats pull the strings now.

I'm also of the very pessimistic opinion that the majority of the bishops no longer have the Faith. Sorry.

As for Cardinal O'malley being among the advisors on this thing. Wasn't he the one who gave the mini-canonization funeral to Ted Kennedy? That says it all right there.

Get ready for more storms. Get ready for full blown out in the open schism.

Lord have mercy.

Yeah, Cardinal O'Malley.  Seriously?  Doh!