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FE already is a great source for info on traditional Catholic customs. Here are a few. Feel free to share.

Bowing head at name of Jesus and Mary.

Epiphany chalk blessing over our doors.

Referring to priest as Father or Fr. [last name].

Midnight or 3 hour Eucharistic fast.

Family altar

Brown scapular, first Friday/first Saturday devotions

Abstinence from meat every Friday.

Modest dress according to the Pius X code

Joyful mysteries on Mondays/Thursdays. Sorrowful on Tuesdays/Fridays/Saturdays. Glorious on Wednesdays/Sundays

Daily Mass ideally before noon

Roman or Baltimore catechism/Douhey-Rheims bible

Novenas

Ember days/Octaves

St Thomas Aquinas the main theology reference

No participation in non-Catholic services/communicatio in sacris

Referring to Protestants as Protestants

Asking first what is the rule/standard according to tradition

Esteeming and having large Catholic families

A formally Catholic education

Generally removing ourselves from scandalous atmospheres in the Church and society

Avoiding excessively informal and familiar interactions with priests. Observing that their state in life is above that of the laity.

Avoiding unnecessary chatter on the way to Sunday Mass.










(09-08-2013, 02:41 PM)christulsa123 Wrote: [ -> ]FE already is a great source for info on traditional Catholic customs. Here are a few. Feel free to share.

Bowing head at name of Jesus and Mary.

Epiphany chalk blessing over our doors.

Referring to priest as Father or Fr. [last name].

Midnight or 3 hour Eucharistic fast.

Family altar

Brown scapular, first Friday/first Saturday devotions

Abstinence from meat every Friday.

Modest dress according to the Pius X code

Joyful mysteries on Mondays/Thursdays. Sorrowful on Tuesdays/Fridays/Saturdays. Glorious on Wednesdays/Sundays

Daily Mass ideally before noon

Roman or Baltimore catechism/Douhey-Rheims bible

Novenas

Ember days/Octaves

St Thomas Aquinas the main theology reference

No participation in non-Catholic services/communicatio in sacris

Referring to Protestants as Protestants

Asking first what is the rule/standard according to tradition

Esteeming and having large Catholic families

A formally Catholic education

Generally removing ourselves from scandalous atmospheres in the Church and society

Avoiding excessively informal and familiar interactions with priests. Observing that their state in life is above that of the laity.

Avoiding unnecessary chatter on the way to Sunday Mass.

Good thread. I'll add :

Holy water fonts in the home

Palm Sunday palms placed on Crucifix or Sick Call cross on the walls at home

Crossing oneself when passing a Catholic church or Catholic cemetery.




Here is one even a lot of pre VII cradle Catholics so often forgot -

Grace after meals as well as before meals.

All the seasonal customs: like Advent's wreaths, calendars, and Jesse Trees; Christmas's 12 days, creches, trees, three Masses, Twelfthnight and King's Cakes; Easter's Paschal candle, painted eggs; St. John's Eve's bonfires; the Days of the Dead, etc. Such beautiful things we have in this Faith!
I thought the Advent Wreath was a Lutheran innovation?
Large families...

I have 6 siblings.  The older I get the more I realize that large families are gifts to the children, and not just because ma and pa like kids.  As the saying goes, the best gift for your child is a brother or sister!  Just in economic terms, the money that all of us have saved by having a sibling who has a particular skill set help out with something.  Now when you start measuring the emotional/spiritual side of it, well - you can't really.
The richness of the traditional church is being brushed aside for the speed and efficiency of the new age liturgy. When they do try to put beauty in it, its usually in odd forms, like rock music communion hymns and liturgical dancers.  Crazy!

Traditional beauty is built up over hundreds of years and has deep and profound meaning. I want to observe all of those traditions and use all of those sacramentals, but I don't know how. I'm unfortunately in between two Latin churches, both over an hour's drive away. If I can go once per month, I'm lucky. What I need is a teacher to show me how to observe tradition, but I don't have one.  Sob Story
(09-08-2013, 05:50 PM)Philosoraptor Wrote: [ -> ]I thought the Advent Wreath was a Lutheran innovation?

I've read that it originated among the Lutherans in Germany -- but, eh, it's a lovely thing and we Catholics have come to do it and have been doing it for eons now.

Here's this, from "Around the Year with the Trapp Family" -- the "Sound of Music" family -- published in 1955. Maria von Trapp had been in a convent for a while, meeting the Captain before she made her vows and finding out she had a different vocation than a religious one:


THE ADVENT WREATH

In the week before the first Sunday in Advent, we began to inquire where
we could obtain the various things necessary to make an Advent wreath

"A what?" was the invariable answer, accompanied by a blank look.

And we learned that nobody seemed to know what an Advent wreath is. (This
was fifteen years ago.) For us it was not a question of whether or not we
would have an Advent wreath. The wreath was a must. Advent would be
unthinkable without it. The question was only how to get it in a country
where nobody seemed to know about it.

Back in Austria we used to go to a toy shop and buy a large hoop, about
three feet in diameter. Then we would tie hay around it, three inches
thick, as a foundation; and around this we would make a beautiful wreath
of balsam twigs. The whole was about three feet in diameter and ten
inches thick. As we tried the different toy shops in Philadelphia, the
sales people only smiled indulgently and made us feel like Rip Van
Winkle. "Around the turn of the century" they had sold the last hoop.

"Necessity is the mother of invention." Martina, who had made the Advent
wreath during our last Advents back home, decided to buy strong wire at a
hardware store and braid it into a round hoop. Then she tied old
newspaper around it, instead of hay, and went out to look for balsam
twigs. We lived in Germantown, a suburb of Philadelphia. Martina looked
at all the evergreens in our friends' gardens, but there was no balsam
fir. So she chose the next best and came home with a laundry basket full
of twigs from a yew tree. In the hardware store, where she had bought the
wire, she also got four tall spikes, which she worked into her newspaper
reel as candleholders, and in the five-and-ten next door she bought a few
yards of strong red ribbon and four candles. The yew twigs made a
somewhat feathery Advent wreath; but, said Martina, "It's round and it's
made of evergreen, and that is all that is necessary." And she was right.
An Advent wreath is round as a symbol of God's mercy of which every
season of Advent is a new reminder; and it has to be made of evergreens
to symbolize God's "everlastingness."

This was the only Advent we celebrated at home because the manager who
arranged the concerts for us had discovered that our tenth child would
soon arrive and had canceled the concerts for the month of December. In
the next few years a much smaller Advent wreath would be made by our
children and fastened to the ceiling of the big blue bus in which we
toured the country. We always started out by looking for balsam fir, but
not until years later, when we were to have our own farm in Vermont,
would we have a balsam Advent wreath again. Meanwhile we had to take what
we could find in the way of evergreens in Georgia it was holly; in
Virginia, boxwood; in Florida, pine. The least desirable of all was
spruce, which we used the year we traveled through Wisconsin, because
spruce loses its needles quickest. But as long as it was an evergreen....

In order to get ready for the celebration of the beginning of Advent, one
more thing has to be added a tall, thick candle, the Advent candle, as a
symbol of Him Whom we call "the Light of the World." During these weeks
of Advent it will be the only light for the family evening prayer. Its
feeble light is the symbol and reminder of mankind's state of spiritual
darkness during Advent.

On the first of January a new calendar year begins. On the first Sunday
of Advent the new year of the Church begins. Therefore, the Saturday
preceding the first Advent Sunday has something of the character of a New
Year's Eve. One of the old customs is to choose a patron saint for the
new year of the Church. The family meets on Saturday evening, and with
the help of the missal and a book called "The Martyrology," which lists
thousands of saints as they are celebrated throughout the year, they
choose as many new saints as there are members of the household. We
always choose them according to a special theme. One year, for instance,
we had all the different Church Fathers; another year we chose only
martyrs; then again, only saints of the new world....During the war we
chose one saint of every country at war.

The newly chosen names are handed over to the calligrapher of the family
(first it was Johanna; after she married, Rosemary took over). She writes
the names of the saints in gothic lettering on little cards. Then she
writes the name of every member of the household on an individual card
and hands the two sets over to the mother. Now everything is ready.

In the afternoon of the first Sunday of Advent, around vesper time, the
whole family--and this always means "family" in the larger sense of the
word, including all the members of the household--meets in the living
room. The Advent wreath hangs suspended from the ceiling on four red
ribbons; the Advent candle stands in the middle of the table or on a
little stand on the side. Solemnly the father lights one candle on the
Advent wreath, and, for the first time, the big Advent candle. Then he
reads the Gospel of the first Sunday of Advent. After this the special
song of Advent is intoned for the first time, the ancient "Ye heavens,
dew drop from above, and rain ye clouds the Just One...."

It cannot be said often enough that during these weeks before Christmas,
songs and hymns of Advent should be sung. No Christmas carols!
Consciously we should work toward restoring the true character of waiting
and longing to these precious weeks before Christmas. Just before
Midnight Mass, on December 24th, is the moment to sing for the first time
"Silent Night, Holy Night," for this is the song for this very night. It
may be repeated afterwards as many times as we please, but it should not
be sung before that holy night.

Since we have found that Advent hymns have been largely forgotten, we
want to include here the ones we most often sing; and we also want to
explain how we collected our songs. First, there were a certain number,
the traditional ones, which were still sung in homes and in church during
the weeks of Advent. Then we looked for collections in libraries; we
inquired among friends and acquaintances; we wrote to people we had met
on our travels in foreign countries. Each song that has come to us in
this way is particularly dear to us--a personal friend rather than a
chance acquaintance.
(09-08-2013, 07:11 PM)PurposefulMother Wrote: [ -> ]The richness of the traditional church is being brushed aside for the speed and efficiency of the new age liturgy. When they do try to put beauty in it, its usually in odd forms, like rock music communion hymns and liturgical dancers.  Crazy!

Traditional beauty is built up over hundreds of years and has deep and profound meaning. I want to observe all of those traditions and use all of those sacramentals, but I don't know how. I'm unfortunately in between two Latin churches, both over an hour's drive away. If I can go once per month, I'm lucky. What I need is a teacher to show me how to observe tradition, but I don't have one.  Sob Story

Yeah, you do! That's what the FE site is all about in large part. See this section:  http://www.fisheaters.com/beingcatholic.html
Blessing of pets (Fr said to bring ours to church!)

Courtship

Praying after Mass

Indulgences

Visiting cemeteries (especially on All Soul's Day)

Visits to the Blessed Sacrament

Parental blessings of children

Husband's blessing of wife

Pilgrimages

Parish fish fries in Lent

Outdoor processions

Visiting people in nursing homes, hospitals, prison, shut-ins


Any other traditional Catholic customsHuh? 












There is simply nothing else like the sections FE has on such customs anywhere on the net. FE is unchallenged in this area I think. The customs are listed, explained, described in detail, alternative possibilities are given  . . .  FE da best for this.
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