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A pretty good take on the Church, where she is going right now, and the dangers that it represents.

About sums it up!
This kind of policy when certain sins are so widespread isn't new . Back when St. Leo IX was treating simoniac and incontinent bishops and other clergy as if there were no problems with them, St. Peter Damien defended him against those who wanted the Pope to depose them, as would be just (Letter 40).   St. Peter points them to the 6th chapter of the 17th epistle of St. Innocent I, where he lays down the policy that to keep peace among the people and clergy of a church, when a sin is committed by a significant population, it often should be tolerated and not subject to disciplinary actions.  St. Innocent I noted of course, that before "setting aside the judgment of God," a pastor must take the utmost care and caution.

This was also the policy of St. Sixtus II toward rebaptism (a sacrilege), which was in contrast to the harder line his immediate predecessor, St. Stephen I, had taken.

In other words, there can be a time for toleration of certain evils.
(10-18-2013, 10:59 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote: [ -> ]This kind of policy when certain sins are so widespread isn't new . Back when St. Leo IX was treating simoniac and incontinent bishops and other clergy as if there were no problems with them, St. Peter Damien defended him against those who wanted the Pope to depose them, as would be just (Letter 40).   St. Peter points them to the 6th chapter of the 17th epistle of St. Innocent I, where he lays down the policy that to keep peace among the people and clergy of a church, when a sin is committed by a significant population, it often should be tolerated and not subject to disciplinary actions.  St. Innocent I noted of course, that before "setting aside the judgment of God," a pastor must take the utmost care and caution.

This was also the policy of St. Sixtus II toward rebaptism (a sacrilege), which was in contrast to the harder line his immediate predecessor, St. Stephen I, had taken.

In other words, there can be a time for toleration of certain evils.

Similarly, I have read that St. Alphonsus did not tell contracepting couples to stop as to not disturb their conscience.
Prudence is always the trickiest virtue to pin down.

We really do this all the time in our own personal lives -- parents who aren't Catholic, sister who is cohabiting, etc.. We obviously love these people, and we don't have to constantly tell about their flaws, but we still should never tell them that what they are doing is good. There is some kind of balance that must be found. But evil is still evil, and these sins can kill the life of God in the hearts of these wounded souls. When Jesus talked to the woman at the well, he did not repudiate her sins first off. But he never gave the impression that they weren't sins. Et. . .et.