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I'm no expert on Benedictine spirituality, but I believe I am called to be a Benedictine Monk, but as a convert, I still must wait two years before I can begin the process of becoming a monk, but nevertheless, I would like to live as Benedictine as possible, is there any good commentaries or advice for living Benedictine as a layman. I know there's Benedictine Oblate's.  I guess I can try to live like one for now. God bless
Commentary for Benedictine Oblates, by G. A. Simon, is the only traditional commentary that I know.  I have it and I've used it.  I don't like it very much.  I find it Jansenistic.  I was shocked to find no discussion whatsoever on that part of the Rule which is one of the Benedictine mottoes, "That in all things God may be glorified."

I am not a Benedictine oblate, but I have adopted a Benedictine spirituality.
Steve, Sister Terese here in the tank is a Benedictine. I'd pm her for advice. Then as a layman I'd say get a Monastic Diurnal, and the Regula of S. Benedict. For starters  http://divinumofficium.com/cgi-bin/horas/officium.pl  has the pre-Trent Monastic Office. It does not have the current Kalendar as it is an attempt to show the Benedictine Office from the time of St. Benedict.

The Monastic Diurnal comes Latin/English, as is the Divinum Officium website. This is the first step prayer and work. I'd suggest Latin, and since you have two years a few courses at the local jr. college would be very good. It's possible to dive into the Diurnal without much Latin and learn from rote. This means you'll pray aloud as is required, be careful with the Pater Noster, which is aloud and which isn't, and learn to pronounce the Latin, while keeping both eyes on the Latin and the English.

I'd start with Completorium, it doesn't change and can jump start your prayer life. The next would be Laudes, because of importance, and then adding Vesperae, which is also important. When you're familiar and have a grasp of the Latin then add the other hours. The Regula is read every day after Prime. The Martyrology is also at Prime and prayers for the dead should be added as well.

The Benedictine Office fell to me when I was helping on Divinum Officium doing proof reading. It captured me. I  pray the major hours along with an online Low Mass and my rosaries, and it keeps me on the straight and narrow. It doesn't have as many Saints as the 1962 or the other versions, so you are aiming straight at God. It's lengthier but to me it feels like an old shoe very comfortable.

Clear Creek has the Regula (Rule) and the Diurnale Monasticum (Monastic Diurnal)

http://clearcreekmonks.org/_product_category/books.html

tim
Which monastery are you looking at? You could start as an Oblate there.

Having a stable schedule is important. When you go to bed, get up, pray, work, eat. Benedictine stability is about staying in one place and following a set routine under an authority. For now that authority can be your spiritual director or the novice master for oblates.
Thanks for all the replys!

@ Clare Brigid: I was thinking of buying that, do you think you could give some pros and cons on it? God bless!

@Tim: I actually have a diurnal, I figured since Liturgy is the heart of Benedictine spirituality, I should start praying it. Though at the moment, I pray the parts I know in Latin and the rest in English (I hope thats okay!)  I've always loved liturgy, when I was converting, I started praying the Liturgy of the Hours, but I stopped after discovering the traditional Breviary's. Oh and I know what you mean, I've seen the difference between the Roman and Benedictine Offices, the Psalm scheme has a strong symbolic meaning in St. Benedict's, He's a genius! As for the Latin, I was planning on buying this eventually http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0...lfboutique Are you familiar with it? God bless!

@Christulsa123: I would think Clear Creek would be where I'd like to join. I actually kept that in mind, I have a fixed schedule for when I should say the hours(unless I got work, which must come first I've learned).  I try to practice Lectio Divina too, but I do not have a Bible commentary, so, I'm somewhat cautious to this, as I don't want to interpret Scripture on my own. And as for a spiritual director, there is only two Priests in my town, one of them is not a fan of the TLM so, I don't think I should go to him, and my parish Priest, I asked, but he said no, (not out of being uncharitable its just that he runs two Parish's, so its understandable). I was thinking of writing Clear Creek, maybe one of the Monks would help me, but I also do not want to bother them, since I have some time before I can join. God bless!
(10-31-2013, 02:11 PM)CatholicSteve21 Wrote: [ -> ]@ Clare Brigid: I was thinking of buying that, do you think you could give some pros and cons on it?

As I said, I found it Jansenistic.  It is excessively focused on mortification.  That is not the Benedictine spirit, which is moderation and the appreciation of and right use of material things, all in balance.  On the plus side, the author provides some interesting historical background.  It's probably better to have than not to have, but I wouldn't center my spiritual reading on it if I were you.

I agree with Tim that you should read the Rule of St. Benedict and continue using the Monastic Diurnal (which is the Benedictine office, praying the psalms as prescribed by St. Benedict in the Rule).  I agree with the advice Chris gave, as well.

However, I would add that you should not put off benefitting from the riches of Benedictine spirituality until you become and oblate.  There is no reason to delay putting it into practice now, to the extent you can.

My spiritual director at Madonna House recommended Benedictine spirituality for me, but he did not say that I should become an oblate.  The only monasteries close to me (e.g., St. Benedict's in Newark, NJ) are exceedingly progressive.   I'm not interested in that.
Here's a little more from Clear Creek. This is their Matins booklet for visitors. It has the Ferial Psalms, and nothing more.

http://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?keyWords=Benedictine+Matins&sorter=relevance-desc


tim
(10-31-2013, 04:54 PM)Tim Wrote: [ -> ]Here's a little more from Clear Creek. This is their Matins booklet for visitors. It has the Ferial Psalms, and nothing more.

http://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?keyWords=Benedictine+Matins&sorter=relevance-desc


tim

oh cool, thanks for the link, I actually own that too lol.  Yes, I think I'm going to buy the Oblate Commentary and a cd from Clear Creek which has a lot of the chants that occur in the office. God bless!
(10-31-2013, 04:34 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2013, 02:11 PM)CatholicSteve21 Wrote: [ -> ]@ Clare Brigid: I was thinking of buying that, do you think you could give some pros and cons on it?

As I said, I found it Jansenistic.  It is excessively focused on mortification.  That is not the Benedictine spirit, which is moderation and the appreciation of and right use of material things, all in balance.  On the plus side, the author provides some interesting historical background.  It's probably better to have than not to have, but I wouldn't center my spiritual reading on it if I were you.

I agree with Tim that you should read the Rule of St. Benedict and continue using the Monastic Diurnal (which is the Benedictine office, praying the psalms as prescribed by St. Benedict in the Rule).  I agree with the advice Chris gave, as well.

However, I would add that you should not put off benefitting from the riches of Benedictine spirituality until you become and oblate.  There is no reason to delay putting it into practice now, to the extent you can.

My spiritual director at Madonna House recommended Benedictine spirituality for me, but he did not say that I should become an oblate.  The only monasteries close to me (e.g., St. Benedict's in Newark, NJ) are exceedingly progressive.   I'm not interested in that.

Oh yes, I will try to live Benedictine now, its why I think I'm going to buy that commentary to help me. God bless!
Make sure Clear Creek is accepting novices first; I know they have real bad overcrowding issues (that's a problem pant-suit nuns don't seem to have Grin), and the monks are living in sheds last I saw!
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