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Besides being a sharp critic of Notre Dame's honoring of Barack Obama, Bishop Blair is also notable for his work in the doctrinal assessment of the LCWR.
"Bishop Blair has been a major player in the on-going drama between the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and the Leadership Conference of Women Religious; in 2008 he was made the Vatican’s delegate for the doctrinal assessment of the LCWR, and his reports and observations on the group’s activities and publications were the basis for the CDF’s official Doctrinal Assessment document, which was released in April 2012. Since then Blair—along with Bishop Thomas Paprocki of Springfield, Illinois—has assisted Seattle Archbishop J. Peter Sartain in renewal efforts for the LCWR, as called for by the CDF."
http://www.catholicworldreport.com/Blog/..._conn.aspx

Michael Sean Winters of the NCR is livid: "The LCWR and Notre Dame brouhahas were not the only instances in which +Blair showed a certain lack of delicacy, a certain penchant for the culture warrior type of episcopal leadership. He was at the forefront of the effort to convince Catholics not to donate funds to the Komen Foundation for cancer research and prevention because they funded mammograms at a variety of health clinics, including those run by Planned Parenthood."


C.
http://ncronline.org/blogs/distinctly-ca...y-hartford

Cetil, thank you for this. I meant to respond to you at another point, but lost track of it.

But although I perhaps see our Pope a bit differently than you, nothing is simple.

You seem to be watching this papacy and the media quite closely and attentively and calling attention to important sides of the complex issues here that can be easily lost. I really do appreciate your diligence.
Not to high jack this thread but quackly who is the lcwr and why are they so bad.
(10-31-2013, 11:46 PM)aschauer82 Wrote: [ -> ]Not to high jack this thread but quackly who is the lcwr and why are they so bad.

The Leadership Council(?) of Women Religious is an organization of nuns being investigated by the Church for alleged heretical and doctrinal issues.
(10-31-2013, 11:46 PM)aschauer82 Wrote: [ -> ]Not to high jack this thread but quackly who is the lcwr and why are they so bad.
 

A small sample of what the Leadership Conference of Women Religious is all about:
" For example, a sister whose motherhouse is in New York reports that the elderly in her order are dispersed in secular nursing homes where access to the sacraments is limited. Many sisters say that it is common in their religious orders for sisters chosen by leadership to give a“reflection” in place of the homily. And they say that strange rituals often replace observances of the Church’s liturgical practices.

Sister Elizabeth McDonough, OP wrote in Review for Religious in 1992 what sisters in dozens of communities have told her: “They are repulsed by rituals that center on shells and stones, streams and twigs, windmills and waterfalls, and at which so fundamental a Christian symbol as the cross of Jesus Christ is often noticeable only by its absence.” And it is obvious this trend continues today, as anyone can see by looking at photos on the web pages of a variety of women’s orders, as well as photos from LCWR assemblies that are posted on www.lcwr.org.

Even the doxology prayed in many of the women’s orders has been debased and neutered, with “Father” being replaced with “Source of all being,” and “Son” replaced with “Eternal word.” Liturgical books also have been corrupted, with many women’s orders replacing the Church’s Liturgy of the Hours with an inclusive-language, feminist version of the daily office. And routinely it is made quite clear to priests that they are not welcome to concelebrate at convent liturgies because the sight of multiple priests is upsetting or offensive to sisters who support the ordination of women."

And: "When the first Women’s Ordination Conference was being organized in 1975, the LCWR president appointed a sister as liaison to the group planning the event. The Vatican curial office overseeing religious subsequently directed the LCWR to dissociate itself from the ordination conference, but the LCWR officers refused, and the sister went on to become coordinator of the organizing task force for the event.
At the 1977 assembly, the new LCWR president, Sister Joan Doyle, BVM, related that sisters were moving into “socio-political ministries” in or out of Church institutions, and she called for women’s involvement in decision-making at every level of the Church, as well as “active participation in all aspects of the church’s ministry.” It was during the 1970s that the LCWR board voted to join the National Organization for Women’s boycott of convention sites in states that had not ratified the Equal Rights Amendment, and the board obtained NGO status for the LCWR at the United Nations.

The 1978 LCWR publication Patterns in Obedience and Authority reported tensions both within religious congregations and between congregations and the US hierarchy:  “US women religious and bishops often appear to have significantly different awarenesses, interpretations, and acceptance of new insights deriving from recent church teaching and the human sciences. There are differing concepts and expectations of authority, of the structures and processes of decision-making; differing images of religious life; differing ideas of ministry and minister.”

As president of the LCWR in 1979, Sister Theresa Kane, RSM, was selected to represent US women religious in greeting Pope John Paul II on his first visit to this country. Even though the Pope had recently reiterated the Church teaching that ordination is reserved to men, Sister Theresa included in her public greeting a demand for including women in all ministries in the Church. Her action caused a further rift within the LCWR, and even more members quit the conference.

As Pope John Paul II became increasingly concerned about religious life in the US, in 1983 he appointed a commission to evaluate American religious life, and he approved a document of guidelines titled Essential Elements in Church Teaching on Religious Life. It broke no new ground, but simply summarized some key elements of religious life. Nevertheless, the LCWR was very vocal in repudiating the document. "

It goes on, but I think you get the picture. See:
http://www.catholicworldreport.com/Blog/...ation.aspx

And also: http://www.catholicworldreport.com/Item/...sters.aspx

C.
Oh wow crazy.
I am a convert for seven years now and as i find my self more in the traditional movement i just can not believe how bad things are
(10-31-2013, 06:28 PM)Roger Buck Wrote: [ -> ]Cetil, thank you for this. I meant to respond to you at another point, but lost track of it.

But although I perhaps see our Pope a bit differently than you, nothing is simple.

You seem to be watching this papacy and the media quite closely and attentively and calling attention to important sides of the complex issues here that can be easily lost. I really do appreciate your diligence.

Thanks. Is this the thread you lost track of? http://catholicforum.fisheaters.com/inde...sg33934270

C.
(11-01-2013, 12:28 AM)aschauer82 Wrote: [ -> ]Oh wow crazy.
I am a convert for seven years now and as i find my self more in the traditional movement i just can not believe how bad things are

It's not that crazy everywhere.  There are nuns where I live who don't seem to go along with the LCWR thing, though this is Novus Ordo territory.
(11-01-2013, 12:28 AM)aschauer82 Wrote: [ -> ]Oh wow crazy.
I am a convert for seven years now and as i find my self more in the traditional movement i just can not believe how bad things are

I think it's actually getting better since at least the LCWR is an issue that is finally being addressed. Given the average of the LCWR nuns which is 74, it is something that will be taken care of by the passage of time if nothing else. They are also very short of vocations. There is an alternative however which is the Council of Major Superiors of Women Religious. More traditional orders of sisters join them.
"According to the 2009 Study on Recent Vocations by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate, the average median age of nuns and sisters in CMSWR institutes was 60, compared with 74 for those in LCWR; among those joining CMSWR institutes only 15% were over 40, compared with 56% for LCWR institutes; 43% of the CMSWR institutes had at least 5 novices, compared with 9% of the LCWR institutes"

http://www.nrvc.net/home_page

C.
A few days ago, someone said that he didn't think there were any orthodox nuns left in the West. I said there are lots and lots of them, both Trad and conservative NO. Like the Sister Servants of Mary, whose North American Mother House is in St Peter's Parish, Kansas City, KS and who supply hospice care for the dying. If you don't live in St Peter's or have had a loved one dying who needed care, you probably haven't heard of them. They just pray and go about their apostolate. They don't belong to the LCRW, they don't 'dissent', and they don't demonstrate or march (except in a group to St Peter's for the major Marian Feasts, since they have only one car for the entire convent!) so they're not 'news'.
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