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Just want to say it's very gratifying to see all this response to the great Hilaire Belloc.

I want to say more, but can't for a couple of days, as I'll be offline.

I will mention in the meantime that if anyone is interested I have an archive of posts about Belloc here - http://corjesusacratissimum.org/tag/hilaire-belloc

Also to Jacob

(11-08-2013, 10:43 AM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]I have the big Triumph book too, but I haven't gotten too far into that yet except for skimming and reading certain articles.  Bozell's article is reprinted in his collection of speeches, articles, and essays that he put together in the mid-80s, Mustard Seeds: A Conservative Becomes a Catholic.  You can buy it online.  I bought my copy new through the Christendom Press website.  It is unfortunate that so much of his stuff and Wilhelmsen's is not online and therefore ignored.

Thanks for this. Definitely want to read this. The Triumph book is amazing! Will say more when I'm back online.

Roger, here are a couple of more links and books you may want to check out:

The Rise and Fall of Triumph: The History of a Radical Roman Catholic Magazine, 1966-1976 by Mark D. Popowski.
This book is a secular, but extremely sympathetic look at the magazine and its history.  I read it this last summer and got a lot out of it.  I ordered it through my library, but if you want to buy, it's here new, or you can find it used at Amazon.  Popowski's dissertation upon which the book is based can be found here in PDF.  I read someplace that his next project is a biography of Frederick Wilhelmsen, whom he knew as a student.

Living on Fire: The Life of L. Brent Bozell Jr. by Daniel Kelly.  It is to be released on January 31 of next year.  I saw it while searching around yesterday.
Quote:The Brilliant, Tormented Pioneer of the Conservative Movement and the Christian Right

From the beginning, L. Brent Bozell seemed destined for great things. An extraordinary orator, the young man with fiery red hair won a national debate competition in high school and later was elected president of Yale’s storied Political Union, where his debating partner was his close friend William F. Buckley Jr. In less than a decade after graduating from Yale, Bozell helped Buckley launch National Review, became a popular columnist and speaker, and, most famously, wrote Barry Goldwater’s landmark book The Conscience of a Conservative.

But after setting his sights on high political office, Bozell took a different route in the 1960s. He abruptly moved his family to Spain; he founded a traditional Catholic magazine, Triumph, that quickly turned radical; he repudiated on religious grounds the U.S. Constitution; he made it his mission to transform America into a Catholic nation; he led a militant antiabortion group known as the Sons of Thunder; he severed ties with his erstwhile friends from the conservative movement, including Buckley (who was also his brother-in-law). By the mid-1970s, Bozell had fallen prey to bipolar disorder and alcoholism, leading life as if “manacled to a roller coaster,” as a friend put it.

Biographer Daniel Kelly tells Bozell’s remarkable story vividly and with sensitivity in Living on Fire. To write this book, Kelly interviewed dozens of friends and family members and gained unprecedented access to Bozell’s private correspondence. The result is a richly textured portrait of a gifted, complex man—his triumphs as well as his struggles.

Once destined for Capitol Hill, L. Brent Bozell wound up working in Washington soup kitchens just blocks away. Bringing mercy to the poor became his vocation—and, as Living on Fire shows, he succeeded admirably by the standards he came to embrace.
Well, well, thank you Jacob!

Sadly, the book is way out of my budget. I would love to read it, but I doubt I can get it in an Irish library. Someday ...

Funnily enough, I just saw Living on Fire myself and was going to tell you ...

I'm still plunging through the big Triumph book. Real gold in there, I think. Perhaps for me the Wilhelmsen stuff most of all, but much, much else besides. A treasure house. I plan to review the book with generous quotations when I can.

I am also glad to see this thread sustained.

I think Belloc and Chesterton and are at the fount of so much Catholic traditionalism. And one thing I am particularly interested in is how that has happened. How has their legacy been passed on?

Clearly, Wilhelmsen, Bozell, Warren H. Carroll and Christendom College have clearly been carrying that torch ... but I wonder who else picked up that torch and passed it onto Trads today?

Any thoughts, anyone?
(11-15-2013, 11:50 AM)Jacob Wrote: [ -> ]Roger, here are a couple of more links and books you may want to check out:

The Rise and Fall of Triumph: The History of a Radical Roman Catholic Magazine, 1966-1976 by Mark D. Popowski.
This book is a secular, but extremely sympathetic look at the magazine and its history.  I read it this last summer and got a lot out of it.  I ordered it through my library, but if you want to buy, it's here new, or you can find it used at Amazon.  Popowski's dissertation upon which the book is based can be found here in PDF.  I read someplace that his next project is a biography of Frederick Wilhelmsen, whom he knew as a student.

Living on Fire: The Life of L. Brent Bozell Jr. by Daniel Kelly.  It is to be released on January 31 of next year.  I saw it while searching around yesterday.
Quote:The Brilliant, Tormented Pioneer of the Conservative Movement and the Christian Right

From the beginning, L. Brent Bozell seemed destined for great things. An extraordinary orator, the young man with fiery red hair won a national debate competition in high school and later was elected president of Yale’s storied Political Union, where his debating partner was his close friend William F. Buckley Jr. In less than a decade after graduating from Yale, Bozell helped Buckley launch National Review, became a popular columnist and speaker, and, most famously, wrote Barry Goldwater’s landmark book The Conscience of a Conservative.

But after setting his sights on high political office, Bozell took a different route in the 1960s. He abruptly moved his family to Spain; he founded a traditional Catholic magazine, Triumph, that quickly turned radical; he repudiated on religious grounds the U.S. Constitution; he made it his mission to transform America into a Catholic nation; he led a militant antiabortion group known as the Sons of Thunder; he severed ties with his erstwhile friends from the conservative movement, including Buckley (who was also his brother-in-law). By the mid-1970s, Bozell had fallen prey to bipolar disorder and alcoholism, leading life as if “manacled to a roller coaster,” as a friend put it.

Biographer Daniel Kelly tells Bozell’s remarkable story vividly and with sensitivity in Living on Fire. To write this book, Kelly interviewed dozens of friends and family members and gained unprecedented access to Bozell’s private correspondence. The result is a richly textured portrait of a gifted, complex man—his triumphs as well as his struggles.

Once destined for Capitol Hill, L. Brent Bozell wound up working in Washington soup kitchens just blocks away. Bringing mercy to the poor became his vocation—and, as Living on Fire shows, he succeeded admirably by the standards he came to embrace.


Jacob, if you cared to say anymore about all this, including why Bozell and Triumph evidently mean a lot to you, I, for one, should be very interested indeed to hear ...

(11-15-2013, 05:01 PM)Roger Buck Wrote: [ -> ]Jacob, if you cared to say anymore about all this, including why Bozell and Triumph evidently mean a lot to you, I, for one, should be very interested indeed to hear ...

Reading contemporary stuff from the 60s and early 70s is fascinating.  Especially stuff that has otherwise fallen off the face of the earth since it was printed in the pre-Web age.

Bozell's life and journey through politics and religion fascinate me as well since where he started and ended up frame certain points in my life.  My grandfather was a staunch anti-communist and pro-life protestor.  I grew up as a little kid listening to him talk about fighting against the communists in China after WWII.  Later on in his life when I was a bit older, I saw firsthand his protesting and the aftermath of his arrest in front of a death clinic.  He spent many years after that suing the police officers and the city of Fargo, ND for damages.  He supported Goldwater in 1964, but when I was a kid, he was a supporter of Buchanan and then later Steve Forbes.  Knowing what I know now, I would really like to have had a conversation with him before he died about if he was aware of the Triumph crew and their efforts and what he thought of them if he did.
Dear Jacob,

The PDF you linked to (Popowski's dissertation upon which the book is based) is very interesting and eye-opening. For instance:

Wilhelmsen traced the origins of capitalism to the “Calvinist Revolution,” which he believed, “altered the structure of our civilization far more deeply than either the French Revolution or the Communist Manifesto.” Calvinism, Wilhelmsen argued, shattered the sacramental (Catholic) vision of the world—a “God transcending within immanence”— and introduced a Manichaean world in which God was the “‘Totally Other,’” retreating “to the lonely splendor of His transcendent majesty.” “No longer was God with man in the drama of the present moment of time,” Wilhelmsen wrote, rather “God was before him in the Kingdom which was to come into history.” To the Calvinist, “Reality was no longer something conserved, cherished, and seen as the robe of God.” In contrast to the Catholic who looked upon creation as good, sanctified as it was by the incarnate God, the Calvinist looked upon “temporal society as nothing but an instrument to bring about the golden world wherein the Lord would dwell in the midst of His saints,” he noted—“The universe became nothing but the ‘raw material’ of Manchestrianism, good only to be exploited and hammered into use.”

WOW!
Wilhelmsen's stuff is awesome, yeah. Smile

I missed that PDF link the first time. I must not have been paying good enough attention the first time - and am sorry about that.

Because that PDF is incredible! Thank you, Jacob. Quite agree with Jake the Rake. But rather than say more here on this Belloc thread, I am going to revive my old thread with the silly name about Crypto-Trads.

What I want to say belongs more there ... and I hoping other people may notice it more easily and comment there.
Continued on in the old thread for those looking to follow:

Re: Who is snuffing your neighbour's kittens? (Crypto-Trads at Christendom College?)
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