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The Italian journalist whose interview with Pope Francis caused an international sensation has revealed that he made up some of the answers that he attributed to the Pope.

Eugenio Scalfari, the founder of La Repubblica, had based the interview on a conversation with the Pope. Scalfari did not record the conversation, nor did he take notes. The 89-year-old editor reconstructed the interview from memory.

Before publishing the interview in La Repubblica, Scalfari wrote to ask the Pope’s permission. He warned the Pontiff:


Keep in mind that I did not include some of the things that you said to me. And that some of the things that I attribute to you, you did not say.
Despite that warning, Scalfari says, the Pope—through his secretary, Msgr. Alfred Xuereb—gave permission to run the interview without changes.

“I am perfectly willing to think that some of the things that I wrote and attributed to him are not shared by the Pope,” Scalfari now concedes.

When the interview first appeared, the Vatican press office said that it was an accurate representation of the Pope’s thinking, although the quotations attributed to the Pontiff might not be exact. The text of the interview was posted on the Vatican web site. But this week that text was removed.


http://www.catholicculture.org/news/head...ryid=19768
I guess the Magisterium of the Media is not infallible after all.
The Pope did willingly walk into that booby-trap, though. I trust he has learned a sobering lesson.
The really terrible part is "reporters" are gone. They last ones died 20 or 30 years ago and these are news personalities. Accuracy is no longer a necessary part of reporting, it's reported through the news personality's personal filter. It's another reason western society is gone. This stuff started with the Nam. Nobody reported the truth but what Westmoreland wanted them to say on the TV. Then there were still reporters, correspondents, and stringers but they were print men and not every paper had these old hands. I so miss the five daily papers here, and my conduit to facts.

tim