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For all you who made an art out of conflating the truth assuming the worst about Pope Francis---accusing him of being a heretic or an antipope---it now turns out the 89 year old journalist who had a conversation with the pope (whose native language is Spanish) now admits that some of the ideas he attributed to the pope are actually not shared by Pope Francis.  But all this was very obvious to anyone who took the time to study, read or simply watch the many homilies or writings Pope Francis has made in the past. But no, the worst was assumed and the condemnation was swift.  This kind of reminds me of how Padre Pio was unjustly accused of all sorts of things he did not do or say, and was punished after gossipers inflated and rapidly spread the gossip filling the minds of others with things which were simply not true.


http://www.catholicculture.org/news/head...ryid=19768

Italian journalist admits inaccuracies in controversial papal interview

The Italian journalist whose interview with Pope Francis caused an international sensation has revealed that he made up some of the answers that he attributed to the Pope.

Eugenio Scalfari, the founder of La Repubblica, had based the interview on a conversation with the Pope. Scalfari did not record the conversation, nor did he take notes. The 89-year-old editor reconstructed the interview from memory.

Before publishing the interview in La Repubblica, Scalfari wrote to ask the Pope’s permission. He warned the Pontiff:

Keep in mind that I did not include some of the things that you said to me. And that some of the things that I attribute to you, you did not say.
Despite that warning, Scalfari says, the Pope—through his secretary, Msgr. Alfred Xuereb—gave permission to run the interview without changes.

“I am perfectly willing to think that some of the things that I wrote and attributed to him are not shared by the Pope,” Scalfari now concedes.

When the interview first appeared, the Vatican press office said that it was an accurate representation of the Pope’s thinking, although the quotations attributed to the Pontiff might not be exact. The text of the interview was posted on the Vatican web site. But this week that text was removed.


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I'm thankful that I bit my tongue, despite having strong reservations about everything that was happening. I'm glad things are now clearing up.