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I am a bit puzzled. Can someone here please explain the Social Kingship of Our Lord?  Smile  and why are trads a bit mad at the repositioning of the feast to the last sunday before advent. Please enlighten me.


The Kingship of Christ refers to laws and governments being set up to honor the Truth (Who is Christ) and the Church's social teaching.  The reason why moving it to just before Advent is a bad idea is because His Kingship is supposed to be acknowledged NOW, in the real world, not just at the end of time, which is what the period just before Advent brings to mind liturgically.  Moving the Feast sorta indicates that "in the future," "sometime down the road," Christ will be King -- rather than that He IS King now.



Celebrating today (ending the liturgical year) isn't an entirely bad idea - in historical context it makes a lot more sense when we realize that fascism on one hand (where a blasphemous creed was being recited in fascist Italy, "I believe in the genius of Mussolini, in our holy father Fascism…and in the resurrection of the Empire") and communism on the other were trying to obviate or pervert the faith across Europe.

We're reminded of that period in our history as much as we are of Christ's eschatological ("His kingdom come") and perennial sovereignty as the firstborn of all creation. There's no beginning and end in the mystery of the Word, but as temporal creatures it's good for us to meditate on the horrors of our past and our helplessness without the Lord.

Trads frown at any changes.  They defend what they have been taught and what inspires them.  This is good. Only that trads must accept that God does not change but people do.  So the religion has to be adapted to the mentality of man in each generation, or we may lose them.  Real tradition is very plain: Holy Trinity, Redemption, Love thy neighbour, Love thy enemies.  Do unto others....
So, you see, Christ the King solemnitas has been for many years the last Sunday of October.  I received my first Communion on Christ the King 1945.
Now it is the last Sunday of the Liturgical Year.  Seems good to me.  So we now sum up the year celebrating the Kingship of Christ, and placing at his feet all our joys and sorrows.

In addition to what Vox said, the traditional position of the Feast of Christ the King was the last Sunday in October to intentionally coincide with Reformation Sunday (Sunday devoted to the celebration of the Protestant revolt in prot circles esp Lutheran). That positioning is now offensive to the ecumania of the age.
(11-24-2013, 12:44 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: [ -> ]The Kingship of Christ refers to laws and governments being set up to honor the Truth (Who is Christ) and the Church's social teaching.  The reason why moving it to just before Advent is a bad idea is because His Kingship is supposed to be acknowledged NOW, in the real world, not just at the end of time, which is what the period just before Advent brings to mind liturgically.  Moving the Feast sorta indicates that "in the future," "sometime down the road," Christ will be King -- rather than that He IS King now.

I didn't get that message at all from the Christ the King Sunday readings, prayers, and homily.  The priest said that Jesus is King of the Universe.
The Feast of Christ the King is not particularly "traditional" anyway. It was established in 1925.
(11-24-2013, 01:35 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]Trads frown at any changes.  They defend what they have been taught and what inspires them.  This is good. Only that trads must accept that God does not change but people do.  So the religion has to be adapted to the mentality of man in each generation, or we may lose them.  Real tradition is very plain: Holy Trinity, Redemption, Love thy neighbour, Love thy enemies.  Do unto others....
So, you see, Christ the King solemnitas has been for many years the last Sunday of October.  I received my first Communion on Christ the King 1945.
Now it is the last Sunday of the Liturgical Year.  Seems good to me.  So we now sum up the year celebrating the Kingship of Christ, and placing at his feet all our joys and sorrows.

Voltape, first, it's not so that "trads frown at any changes." I'm a trad and there were lots of things that went on in the pre-conciliar era that I absolutely believe needed to be changed. I've written a number of posts about such things.

Second, "we" here don't celebrate the Feast of Christ the King today. This is a trad site (see http://www.fisheaters.com/traditionalcatholicism.html ), with almost all of us using the 1962 Missal and liturgical calendar, which celebrated the Feast of Christ the King on October 27 this year. (Note that some trads here don't have the option of attending the TLM so might attend Novus Ordo Masses which celebrate that Feast today, but for any trad -- as defined at the link above -- the ideal is, at least, the 1962 Missal and liturgical calendar.)  This isn't the place to try to sell trads on the new rite and new liturgical calendar. It just isn't. That's what places like CAF are for. Here, we're traditional Catholics, and such style of worship is encouraged by Summorum Pontificium. We have every right to be trads and to defend the trad way of doing things. That's what this place is about.

 
(11-24-2013, 01:49 PM)dark lancer Wrote: [ -> ]I didn't get that message at all from the Christ the King Sunday readings, prayers, and homily.  The priest said that Jesus is King of the Universe.

Read Quas Primus:  http://www.fisheaters.com/quasprimas.html

An excerpt:

5. This kingdom is spiritual and is concerned with spiritual things. That this is so the above quotations from Scripture amply prove, and Christ by his own action confirms it. On many occasions, when the Jews and even the Apostles wrongly supposed that the Messiah would restore the liberties and the kingdom of Israel, he repelled and denied such a suggestion. When the populace thronged around him in admiration and would have acclaimed him King, he shrank from the honor and sought safety in flight. Before the Roman magistrate he declared that his kingdom was not of this world. The gospels present this kingdom as one which men prepare to enter by penance, and cannot actually enter except by faith and by baptism, which, though an external rite, signifies and produces an interior regeneration. This kingdom is opposed to none other than to that of Satan and to the power of darkness. It demands of its subjects a spirit of detachment from riches and earthly things, and a spirit of gentleness. They must hunger and thirst after justice, and more than this, they must deny themselves and carry the cross.

16. Christ as our Redeemer purchased the Church at the price of his own blood; as priest he offered himself, and continues to offer himself as a victim for our sins. Is it not evident, then, that his kingly dignity partakes in a manner of both these offices?

17. It would be a grave error, on the other hand, to say that Christ has no authority whatever in civil affairs, since, by virtue of the absolute empire over all creatures committed to him by the Father, all things are in his power. Nevertheless, during his life on earth he refrained from the exercise of such authority, and although he himself disdained to possess or to care for earthly goods, he did not, nor does he today, interfere with those who possess them. Non eripit mortalia qui regna dat caelestia.[27]

18. Thus the empire of our Redeemer embraces all men. To use the words of Our immortal predecessor, Pope Leo XIII: "His empire includes not only Catholic nations, not only baptized persons who, though of right belonging to the Church, have been led astray by error, or have been cut off from her by schism, but also all those who are outside the Christian faith; so that truly the whole of mankind is subject to the power of Jesus Christ."[28] Nor is there any difference in this matter between the individual and the family or the State; for all men, whether collectively or individually, are under the dominion of Christ. In him is the salvation of the individual, in him is the salvation of society. "Neither is there salvation in any other, for there is no other name under heaven given to men whereby we must be saved."[29] He is the author of happiness and true prosperity for every man and for every nation. "For a nation is happy when its citizens are happy. What else is a nation but a number of men living in concord?"[30] If, therefore, the rulers of nations wish to preserve their authority, to promote and increase the prosperity of their countries, they will not neglect the public duty of reverence and obedience to the rule of Christ. What We said at the beginning of Our Pontificate concerning the decline of public authority, and the lack of respect for the same, is equally true at the present day. "With God and Jesus Christ," we said, "excluded from political life, with authority derived not from God but from man, the very basis of that authority has been taken away, because the chief reason of the distinction between ruler and subject has been eliminated. The result is that human society is tottering to its fall, because it has no longer a secure and solid foundation."[31]

19. When once men recognize, both in private and in public life, that Christ is King, society will at last receive the great blessings of real liberty, well-ordered discipline, peace and harmony. Our Lord's regal office invests the human authority of princes and rulers with a religious significance; it ennobles the citizen's duty of obedience. It is for this reason that St. Paul, while bidding wives revere Christ in their husbands, and slaves respect Christ in their masters, warns them to give obedience to them not as men, but as the vicegerents of Christ; for it is not meet that men redeemed by Christ should serve their fellow-men. "You are bought with a price; be not made the bond-slaves of men."[32] If princes and magistrates duly elected are filled with the persuasion that they rule, not by their own right, but by the mandate and in the place of the Divine King, they will exercise their authority piously and wisely, and they will make laws and administer them, having in view the common good and also the human dignity of their subjects. The result will be a stable peace and tranquillity, for there will be no longer any cause of discontent. Men will see in their king or in their rulers men like themselves, perhaps unworthy or open to criticism, but they will not on that account refuse obedience if they see reflected in them the authority of Christ God and Man. Peace and harmony, too, will result; for with the spread and the universal extent of the kingdom of Christ men will become more and more conscious of the link that binds them together, and thus many conflicts will be either prevented entirely or at least their bitterness will be diminished.

20. If the kingdom of Christ, then, receives, as it should, all nations under its way, there seems no reason why we should despair of seeing that peace which the King of Peace came to bring on earth - he who came to reconcile all things, who came not to be ministered unto but to minister, who, though Lord of all, gave himself to us as a model of humility, and with his principal law united the precept of charity; who said also: "My yoke is sweet and my burden light." Oh, what happiness would be Ours if all men, individuals, families, and nations, would but let themselves be governed by Christ! "Then at length," to use the words addressed by our predecessor, Pope Leo XIII, twenty-five years ago to the bishops of the Universal Church, "then at length will many evils be cured; then will the law regain its former authority; peace with all its blessings be restored. Men will sheathe their swords and lay down their arms when all freely acknowledge and obey the authority of Christ, and every tongue confesses that the Lord Jesus Christ is in the glory of God the Father."[33]

21. That these blessings may be abundant and lasting in Christian society, it is necessary that the kingship of our Savior should be as widely as possible recognized and understood, and to the end nothing would serve better than the institution of a special feast in honor of the Kingship of Christ. For people are instructed in the truths of faith, and brought to appreciate the inner joys of religion far more effectually by the annual celebration of our sacred mysteries than by any official pronouncement of the teaching of the Church. Such pronouncements usually reach only a few and the more learned among the faithful; feasts reach them all; the former speak but once, the latter speak every year - in fact, forever. The church's teaching affects the mind primarily; her feasts affect both mind and heart, and have a salutary effect upon the whole of man's nature. Man is composed of body and soul, and he needs these external festivities so that the sacred rites, in all their beauty and variety, may stimulate him to drink more deeply of the fountain of God's teaching, that he may make it a part of himself, and use it with profit for his spiritual life.

22. History, in fact, tells us that in the course of ages these festivals have been instituted one after another according as the needs or the advantage of the people of Christ seemed to demand: as when they needed strength to face a common danger, when they were attacked by insidious heresies, when they needed to be urged to the pious consideration of some mystery of faith or of some divine blessing. Thus in the earliest days of the Christian era, when the people of Christ were suffering cruel persecution, the cult of the martyrs was begun in order, says St. Augustine, "that the feasts of the martyrs might incite men to martyrdom."[34] The liturgical honors paid to confessors, virgins and widows produced wonderful results in an increased zest for virtue, necessary even in times of peace. But more fruitful still were the feasts instituted in honor of the Blessed Virgin. As a result of these men grew not only in their devotion to the Mother of God as an ever-present advocate, but also in their love of her as a mother bequeathed to them by their Redeemer. Not least among the blessings which have resulted from the public and legitimate honor paid to the Blessed Virgin and the saints is the perfect and perpetual immunity of the Church from error and heresy. We may well admire in this the admirable wisdom of the Providence of God, who, ever bringing good out of evil, has from time to time suffered the faith and piety of men to grow weak, and allowed Catholic truth to be attacked by false doctrines, but always with the result that truth has afterwards shone out with greater splendor, and that men's faith, aroused from its lethargy, has shown itself more vigorous than before.

23. The festivals that have been introduced into the liturgy in more recent years have had a similar origin, and have been attended with similar results. When reverence and devotion to the Blessed Sacrament had grown cold, the feast of Corpus Christi was instituted, so that by means of solemn processions and prayer of eight days' duration, men might be brought once more to render public homage to Christ. So, too, the feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus was instituted at a time when men were oppressed by the sad and gloomy severity of Jansenism, which had made their hearts grow cold, and shut them out from the love of God and the hope of salvation.

24. If We ordain that the whole Catholic world shall revere Christ as King, We shall minister to the need of the present day, and at the same time provide an excellent remedy for the plague which now infects society. We refer to the plague of anti-clericalism, its errors and impious activities. This evil spirit, as you are well aware, Venerable Brethren, has not come into being in one day; it has long lurked beneath the surface. The empire of Christ over all nations was rejected. The right which the Church has from Christ himself, to teach mankind, to make laws, to govern peoples in all that pertains to their eternal salvation, that right was denied. Then gradually the religion of Christ came to be likened to false religions and to be placed ignominiously on the same level with them. It was then put under the power of the state and tolerated more or less at the whim of princes and rulers. Some men went even further, and wished to set up in the place of God's religion a natural religion consisting in some instinctive affection of the heart. There were even some nations who thought they could dispense with God, and that their religion should consist in impiety and the neglect of God. The rebellion of individuals and states against the authority of Christ has produced deplorable consequences. We lamented these in the Encyclical Ubi arcano; we lament them today: the seeds of discord sown far and wide; those bitter enmities and rivalries between nations, which still hinder so much the cause of peace; that insatiable greed which is so often hidden under a pretense of public spirit and patriotism, and gives rise to so many private quarrels; a blind and immoderate selfishness, making men seek nothing but their own comfort and advantage, and measure everything by these; no peace in the home, because men have forgotten or neglect their duty; the unity and stability of the family undermined; society in a word, shaken to its foundations and on the way to ruin. We firmly hope, however, that the feast of the Kingship of Christ, which in future will be yearly observed, may hasten the return of society to our loving Savior. It would be the duty of Catholics to do all they can to bring about this happy result. Many of these, however, have neither the station in society nor the authority which should belong to those who bear the torch of truth. This state of things may perhaps be attributed to a certain slowness and timidity in good people, who are reluctant to engage in conflict or oppose but a weak resistance; thus the enemies of the Church become bolder in their attacks. But if the faithful were generally to understand that it behooves them ever to fight courageously under the banner of Christ their King, then, fired with apostolic zeal, they would strive to win over to their Lord those hearts that are bitter and estranged from him, and would valiantly defend his rights.

25. Moreover, the annual and universal celebration of the feast of the Kingship of Christ will draw attention to the evils which anticlericalism has brought upon society in drawing men away from Christ, and will also do much to remedy them. While nations insult the beloved name of our Redeemer by suppressing all mention of it in their conferences and parliaments, we must all the more loudly proclaim his kingly dignity and power, all the more universally affirm his rights.

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See also the Consecration of the Human Race to the Sacred Heart that's done on the Feast of Christ the King -- info from FishEaters


Most sweet Jesus, Redeemer of the human race, look down upon us humbly prostrate before Thine altar. We are Thine, and Thine we wish to be; but, to be more surely united with Thee, behold each one of us freely consecrates himself today to Thy most Sacred Heart.

Many indeed have never known Thee; many too, despising Thy precepts, have rejected Thee. Have mercy on them all, most merciful Jesus, and draw them to Thy sacred Heart. Be Thou King, O Lord, not only of the faithful who have never forsaken Thee, but also of the prodigal children who have abandoned Thee; grant that they may quickly return to Thy Father's house lest they die of wretchedness and hunger.

Be Thou King of those who are deceived by erroneous opinions, or whom discord keeps aloof, and call them back to the harbor of truth and unity of faith, so that there may be but one flock and one Shepherd.

Be Thou King of all those who are still involved in the darkness of idolatry or of Islamism, and refuse not to draw them into the light and kingdom of God. Turn Thine eyes of mercy towards the children of the race, once Thy chosen people: of old they called down upon themselves the Blood of the Savior; may it now descend upon them a laver of redemption and of life.

Grant, O Lord, to Thy Church assurance of freedom and immunity from harm; give peace and order to all nations, and make the earth resound from pole to pole with one cry: "Praise be to the divine Heart that wrought our salvation; to it be glory and honor for ever." Amen. 1



I have no power whatsoever to move a Solemnitas, so I bow my head and go along. But I do have an opinion on the Feast of Christ the King The progressives have convinced the more conservative in the Church it's some mystical point in the future. The Trads  are promoting the return of Christendom with the Papal States and the Holy Roman Empire brought back by some hidden King who will return Europe to Kings, Courts, Knights and Ladies. Horsefeathers on both.

The Social Kingship of Christ is our job, just like EENS it puts a responsibility on us to convert the pagans we live among. s we convert and bring them to the Church, their addition to the right thinking will pressure these willfully wicked governments to acknowledge Christ as the King. In case you haven't noticed Vox is a large proponent of this. She is all about us getting the message of the Good News out there. We have become navel gazers, and not doers.

Right now this is an immense problem. Our world is diabolically disoriented. Go out into the streets and you'll know, right thinking is fighting words. But we need to do it anyway. I believe the solution is "basics". We need a skinny Catechism for the dense. We need then to get them to a place for catechesis of the sacraments, there more can be taught. We need to hand out Brown Scapulars to the fallen away, and rosaries to the ignorant and the fallen away.

This is what the Church needs to push, and all of us need to do.

tim
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