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This is VERY helpful indeed, I think ... not sure how I missed it before ...

I'm adding some red bold and white space.

'Evangelii Gaudium' amounts to Francis' 'I Have a Dream' speech

John L. Allen Jr.  |  Nov. 26, 2013

ANALYSIS Dreams can be powerful things, especially when articulated by leaders with the realistic capacity to translate them into action. That was the case 50 years ago with Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream" speech, and it also seems to be the ambition of Pope Francis' bold new apostolic exhortation, "The Joy of the Gospel."

In effect, the 224-page document, titled in Latin Evangelii Gaudium and released by the Vatican Tuesday, is a vision statement about the kind of community Francis wants Catholicism to be: more missionary, more merciful, and with the courage to change.

Francis opens with a dream.

"I dream of a 'missionary option,' " Francis writes, "that is, a missionary impulse capable of transforming everything, so that the church's customs, ways of doing things, times and schedules, language and structures can be suitably channeled for the evangelization of today's world, rather than for her self-preservation."

In particular, Francis calls for a church marked by a special passion for the poor and for peace.

The theme of change permeates the document. The pope says rather than being afraid of "going astray," what the church ought to fear instead is "remaining shut up within structures that give us a false sense of security, within rules that make us harsh judges" and "within habits that make us feel safe."

Though Francis released an encyclical letter titled Lumen Fidei in June, that text was based largely on a draft prepared by Benedict XVI. "The Joy of the Gospel," designed as a reflection on the October 2012 Synod of Bishops on new evangelization, thus represents the new pope's real debut as an author.

Early reaction suggests it's a tour de force.

The text comes with Francis' now-familiar flashes of homespun language. Describing an upbeat tone as a defining Christian quality, for instance, he writes that "an evangelizer must never look like someone who has just come back from a funeral!"

At another point, Francis insists that "the church is not a tollhouse." Instead, he says, "it is the house of the Father, where there is a place for everyone." At another point, he quips that "the confessional must not be a torture chamber," but rather "an encounter with the Lord's mercy which spurs us to on to do our best."

Francis acknowledges that realizing his dream will require "a reform of the church," stipulating that "what I am trying to express here has a programmatic significance and important consequences."

Though he doesn't lay out a comprehensive blueprint for reform, he goes beyond mere hints to fairly blunt indications of direction:

*He calls for a "conversion of the papacy," saying he wants to promote "a sound decentralization" and candidly admitting that in recent years "we have made little progress" on that front.

*He suggests that bishops' conferences ought to be given "a juridical status ... including genuine doctrinal authority." In effect, that would amount to a reversal of a 1998 Vatican ruling under John Paul II that only individual bishops in concert with the pope, and not episcopal conferences, have such authority.

*Francis says the Eucharist "is not a prize for the perfect, but a powerful medicine and nourishment for the weak," insisting that "the doors of the sacraments" must not "be closed for simply any reason." His language could have implications not only for divorced and remarried Catholics, but also calls for refusing the Eucharist to politicians or others who do not uphold church teaching on some matters.


*He calls for collaborative leadership, saying bishops and pastors must use "the means of participation proposed in the Code of Canon Law and other forms of pastoral dialogue, out of a desire to listen to everyone and not simply to those who would tell him what he would like to hear."

Francis criticizes forces within the church who seem to lust for "veritable witch hunts," asking rhetorically, "Whom are we going to evangelize if this is the way we act?"

*He cautions against "ostentatious preoccupation" for liturgy and doctrine as opposed to ensuring that the Gospel has "a real impact" on people and engages "the concrete needs of the present time."

On two specific matters, however, Francis rules out change: the ordination of women to the priesthood, though he calls for "a more incisive female presence" in decision-making roles, and abortion.

Francis says the church's defense of unborn life "cannot be expected to change" because it's "closely linked to the defense of each and every other human right."

The pope's toughest language comes in a section of the document arguing that solidarity with the poor and the promotion of peace are constituent elements of what it means to be a missionary church.

Francis denounces what he calls a "crude and naïve trust" in the free market, saying that left to its own devices, the market too often fosters a "throw-away culture" in which certain categories of people are seen as disposable. He rejects what he describes as an "invisible and almost virtual" economic "tyranny."

Specifically, Francis calls on the church to oppose spreading income inequality and unemployment, as well as to advocate for stronger environmental protection and against armed conflict.

In the end, "The Joy of the Gospel" amounts to a forceful call for a more missionary Catholicism in the broadest sense. The alternative, Francis warns, is not pleasant.

"We do not live better when we flee, hide, refuse to share, stop giving and lock ourselves up in our own comforts," he writes. "Such a life is nothing less than slow suicide."

Source: http://ncronline.org/news/theology/evang...eam-speech
I have a suggestion. Why not read teh real document itself instead of relying on intermediaries to tell us what it says.
:) :) :)

http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/france...um_en.html


The following is terrifying:

Quote:*He calls for a "conversion of the papacy," saying he wants to promote "a sound decentralization" and candidly admitting that in recent years "we have made little progress" on that front.

*He suggests that bishops' conferences ought to be given "a juridical status ... including genuine doctrinal authority." In effect, that would amount to a reversal of a 1998 Vatican ruling under John Paul II that only individual bishops in concert with the pope, and not episcopal conferences, have such authority.

I'm all about subsidiarity -- but that's a political concept to be applied to government and social structures, not to the Bride of Christ with the Vicar of CHRIST as Her earthly head, guided by the Holy Ghost HImself  The idea of giving, say, a Mahony "genuine doctrinal authority" -- oh, hell no. Think of what the USCCB is like, their political liberalism in so many matters, and think about how they came up with that document that said Jews are in a saving Covenant. WTF? Those jokers can't have any "genuine doctrinal authority." :And what "doctrine" could they have authority over? I mean, we're talking DOCTRINE here. Would Germany's "doctrine" be different from the "doctrine" taught in Great Britain? What would any of this even mean in real life?

And this:

Quote:*He cautions against "ostentatious preoccupation" for liturgy and doctrine as opposed to ensuring that the Gospel has "a real impact" on people and engages "the concrete needs of the present time."

"Ostentatious" preoccupation with the liturgy? It wasn't the folks in the pews who spent decades torturing the liturgy practically to death! Is our expecting, praying for, and working for the liturgy of our ancestors "ostentatious"?  And why is concern for the liturgy and doctrine seen as OPPOSED to ensuring the Gospel has a real impact?! That's a ridiculous false dichotomy -- one that the neo-Cats and the toxic trads both make, with each focusing on one or the other. It's madness!

Quote:On two specific matters, however, Francis rules out change: the ordination of women to the priesthood, though he calls for "a more incisive female presence" in decision-making roles, and abortion.

He wants "a more incisive female presence" with regard to abortion? What does THAT mean? I mean, if there's going to be an abortion, there has to be a pregnant female there, but what else about abortion is there to say except that it's murder -- always has been, always will be? If 1,000 CATHOLIC women all gathered together in a room and talked about abortion, what could they possibly "decide" about it that would be any different than what is taught now?

I wouldn't mind having women involved in "decision-making" with regard to various things, at various levels (as long as nothing that's reserved for the ordained is passed on to them, and as long as the women don't walk around thinking they're "priests" or some crap), but I don't know how abortion plays into any of that at all. And, too, I can only imagine the type of "Catholic" women who'd actually get any hearing from the Bishops and Cardinals. I know they wouldn't listen to me about anything. What about you women reading this? Think they'd care what you thought about anything?

This is scary stuff.



Quote:Can. 752 Although not an assent of faith, a religious submission of the intellect and will must be given to a doctrine which the Supreme Pontiff or the college of bishops declares concerning faith or morals when they exercise the authentic magisterium, even if they do not intend to proclaim it by definitive act; therefore, the Christian faithful are to take care to avoid those things which do not agree with it.

Code of Canon Law, Canon 752.


(12-14-2013, 07:29 AM)Poche Wrote: [ -> ]I have a suggestion. Why not read teh real document itself instead of relying on intermediaries to tell us what it says.
:) :) :)

http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/france...um_en.html

Poche, your point is well-taken - but EG is very long. I need time ...

Personally, I have come to trust John Allen quite a lot - having read several books by him - including his very sympathetic balanced account of Opus Dei.

Whatever his own views, the man is RARE - he actively tries to listen to both sides and he really tries to be fair.

People may judge him for the NCR connection - but Allen is markedly, markedly different from anyone on that rag.

If anyone wants to know what I mean when I say how much effort John Allen Jr makes to listen to both sides, simply LISTEN for God's sake, they can go here:

http://corjesusacratissimum.org/2009/02/...t-by-mark/


The piece was originally written in 2003 when I was much less traditional than I am today - but I stand by it. JA Jr is fair man, trying to represent the different sides he is genuinely listening to.


O Lord, how I want to respond to Vox and Clare, but I will keep my tongue tied for a bit longer at least ... Maybe you could clarify your point, Clare?


Vox, I believe that part about women participation and abortion was saying that they were two seperate things, no that women should have a decision on abortion
(12-14-2013, 09:48 AM)ConverteNosDeus Wrote: [ -> ]Vox, I believe that part about women participation and abortion was saying that they were two seperate things, no that women should have a decision on abortion
This. Pope Francis has made his views on abortion very clear. Check the relevant section in Wikipedia's article about him, there were many things I've not heard and I follow this pontificate quite closely. Apparently media weren't so interested in reporting that.
(12-14-2013, 09:21 AM)Roger Buck Wrote: [ -> ]Maybe you could clarify your point, Clare?

My point is that we are not free to critique and cherrypick a major teaching document of the Holy Father.  I am reminding the forum of our duty as Catholics, which is enjoined on us by the Code of Canon Law.
Quote:This religious submission of mind and will must be shown in a special way to the authentic magisterium of the Roman Pontiff, even when he is not speaking ex cathedra; that is, it must be shown in such a way that his supreme magisterium is acknowledged with reverence, the judgments made by him are sincerely adhered to, according to his manifest mind and will. His mind and will in the matter may be known either from the character of the documents, from his frequent repetition of the same doctrine, or from his manner of speaking.

Lumen Gentium, 25.
(12-14-2013, 09:48 AM)ConverteNosDeus Wrote: [ -> ]Vox, I believe that part about women participation and abortion was saying that they were two seperate things, no that women should have a decision on abortion

Yep, that comma is there for a reason!
(12-14-2013, 07:49 AM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: [ -> ]I'm all about subsidiarity -- but that's a political concept to be applied to government and social structures, not to the Bride of Christ with the Vicar of CHRIST as Her earthly head, guided by the Holy Ghost HImself  The idea of giving, say, a Mahony "genuine doctrinal authority" -- oh, hell no. Think of what the USCCB is like, their political liberalism in so many matters, and think about how they came up with that document that said Jews are in a saving Covenant. WTF? Those jokers can't have any "genuine doctrinal authority." :And what "doctrine" could they have authority over? I mean, we're talking DOCTRINE here. Would Germany's "doctrine" be different from the "doctrine" taught in Great Britain? What would any of this even mean in real life?

Bishops already have genuine doctrinal authority and they have had it since day one.  Bishops are not vicars of the Pope.  The ordinary Magisterium is the teaching of bishops (including the Bishop of Rome).  Individual bishops have real doctrinal authority over their flocks and provincial and national synods of bishops had real authority and were common until Vatican II--they were explicitly required by Nicea I and Trent, Vatican I planned to address them, Vatican II encouraged them as well as Conferences (one of the many forgotten and ignored directives of the Council). and canon law provides for them.  What I don't really understand is why endowing bishop's conferences with real doctrinal authority is even a question at all--the same effect can be had by just reverting to traditional practice of local and national synods, which are already provided for in the Church's law. 

How this would play out would, I assume, be like it played out for centuries until very, very recently, with local synods dealing with any doctrinal controversies that crop up in their territory, and the Pope only getting involved  when the particular issue is a problem for the whole Church or if a correction needs to be made to a local synod's decision.  For this to work like it has always worked, the Pope will have to do his job to serve unity by willing to intervene when unity is threatened.
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