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A little blast from the past to start the new year off right. From the Wall Street Journal:





Traditional Catholicism Is Winning
There were 467 new priestly ordinations in the U.S. last year, and Boston's seminary had to turn away applicants.
By Anne Hendershott and Christopher White
April 12, 2012 7:17 p.m. ET



In his Holy Thursday homily at St. Peter's Basilica on April 5, Pope Benedict XVI denounced calls from some Catholics for optional celibacy among priests and for women's ordination. The pope said that "true renewal" comes only through the "joy of faith" and "radicalism of obedience."

And renewal is coming. After the 2002 scandal about sexual abuse by clergy, progressive Catholics were predicting the end of the celibate male priesthood in books like "Full Pews and Empty Altars" and "The Death of Priesthood." Yet today the number of priestly ordinations is steadily increasing.

A new seminary is to be built near Charlotte, N.C., and the archdiocese of Washington, D.C., has expanded its facilities to accommodate the surge in priestly candidates. Boston's Cardinal Sean Patrick O'Malley recently told the National Catholic Register that when he arrived in 2003 to lead that archdiocese he was advised to close the seminary. Now there are 70 men in Boston studying to be priests, and the seminary has had to turn away candidates for lack of space.

According to the Vatican's Central Office of Church Statistics, there were more than 5,000 more Catholic priests world-wide in 2009 than there were in 1999. This is welcome news for a growing Catholic population that has suffered through a real shortage of priests.

The situation in the U.S. is still tenuous. The number of American Catholics has grown to 77.7 million, up from 50 million in 1980. But the priest-to-parishioner ratio has changed for the worse. In 1965, there was one priest for every 780 American parishioners. By 1985, there was one priest for every 900 Catholics, and by 2011 there was one for every 2,000. In dioceses where there are few ordinations, such as New York's Rochester and Albany, people know this shortage well.

Still, the future is encouraging. There were 467 new priestly ordinations in the U.S. last year, according to a survey by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University, up from 442 a decade ago.

While some of the highest numbers of new priests are in the Catholic-majority cities of Newark, N.J., and Philadelphia, ordinations in Washington, D.C. (18 last year) and Chicago (26) also are booming. The biggest gains are not only in traditional Catholic strongholds. In Lincoln, Neb., Catholics constitute only 16% of the population yet have some of the strongest numbers of ordinations. In 2011, there were 10 men ordained as priests in Lincoln.

What explains the trend? Nearly 20 years ago, Archbishop Elden Curtiss, then leader of the Omaha, Neb., diocese, suggested that when dioceses are unambiguous and allow a minimum of dissent about the male, celibate priesthood, more candidates answer the call to the priesthood. Our preliminary research on the correlates of priestly ordinations reveals that the dioceses with the largest numbers of new priests are led by courageous bishops with faithful and inspirational vocations offices.

Leadership and adherence to church doctrine certainly distinguish the bishop of Lincoln, the Most Rev. Fabian Bruskewitz. He made national news in 1996 when he stated that members of dissident Catholic groups including Call to Action and Catholics for Choice had automatically excommunicated themselves from the church.

Cardinal Francis George, the longtime leader of the Chicago archdiocese, once gave a homily that startled the faithful by pronouncing liberal Catholicism "an exhausted project . . . parasitical on a substance that no longer exists." Declaring that Catholics are at a "turning point" in the life of the church in this country, the cardinal concluded that the bishops must stand as a "reality check for the apostolic faith."

Such forthright defense of the faith and doctrine stands in clear contrast to the emphasis of an earlier generation of Catholic theologians and historians. Many boomer priests and scholars were shaped by what they believed was an "unfulfilled promise" of Vatican II to embrace modernity. Claiming that the only salvation for the church would be to ordain women, remove the celibacy requirement and empower the laity, theologians such as Paul Lakeland, a Fairfield University professor and former Jesuit priest, have demanded that much of the teaching authority of the bishops and priests be transferred to the laity.

This aging generation of progressives continues to lobby church leaders to change Catholic teachings on reproductive rights, same-sex marriage and women's ordination. But it is being replaced by younger men and women who are attracted to the church because of the very timelessness of its teachings.

They are attracted to the philosophy, the art, the literature and the theology that make Catholicism countercultural. They are drawn to the beauty of the liturgy and the church's commitment to the dignity of the individual. They want to be contributors to that commitment—alongside faithful and courageous bishops who ask them to make sacrifices. It is time for Catholics to celebrate their arrival.

Ms. Hendershott is distinguished visiting professor at the King's College in New York. Mr. White is the international director of operations with the World Youth Alliance. They are the co-authors of the forthcoming "Beyond the Catholic Culture Wars" (Encounter Books).

Vox Wrote:
:)


I wonder how many on the new 467 ordained priests are Traditional, i.e. FSSP, ICKSP, etc.
(01-01-2014, 01:39 PM)Geographer Wrote: [ -> ]I wonder how many on the new 467 ordained priests are Traditional, i.e. FSSP, ICKSP, etc.

I reckon that this only includes non-traditional groups, but FSSP usually ordains 5-8 priests a year and ICKSP ordinations take place in Europe so they wouldn't be in the statistics.  Otherwise it is still a very small number compared to diocesan but probably more than most religious congregations (i.e. Capuchins, OFM, OP, etc.)

Now how many of those priests are traditionally influenced, that probably would be the majority.   
These statistics are a bit dated since I collected them a couple years ago but they are still interesting.  They also only deal with the three Traditionalist groups with the most prominent presence in the USA.  The numbers also show international membership if I recall correctly.

______________________________________________________________


SSPX:  January 2010 -  511 priests and over 200 seminarians. The priests are distributed among the 6 seminaries and about 125 houses and churches, in 30 countries spread on the 5 continents.

In 2011 they gained 58 new seminarians.  18 in the USA thus bringing their Minnesota seminary to 100 seminarians.

Institute of Christ the King:

(taken from their current webpage 2-11-12)
50 priests
80 seminarians

Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter

Statistics as of October 1, 2011:
Total: 392
•Priests (including associated
and postulating priests): 228
•Deacons: 10
•Non-deacons seminarians
(including postulants): 154
•Average age of members: 36 years
•Deceased members: 5
•Nationalities: 35
(01-01-2014, 02:41 PM)AntoniusMaximus Wrote: [ -> ]Now how many of those priests are traditionally influenced, that probably would be the majority.     

Absolutely.

I think back to a conversation I had not long ago with a youngish adult in my parish. They were critical of the previous priest, a fairly traditionally-minded priest, for "forsaking" the youth in favour of grooming about a half a dozen young men to discern for priesthood. One of those young men is currently in seminary, and one I believe is still working on his bachelors degree and has not yet applied but is intending to apply.

I didn't understand what they meant by "forsaking" the youth. If you mean pandering to the youth, certainly he put a stop to that nonsense. I'm not sure why it's the Church's job to minister to the young... I mean, isn't that in part the job of parents? Shouldn't the Church just be what it is?
(01-01-2014, 06:58 PM)PrairieMom Wrote: [ -> ]I think back to a conversation I had not long ago with a youngish adult in my parish. They were critical of the previous priest, a fairly traditionally-minded priest, for "forsaking" the youth in favour of grooming about a half a dozen young men to discern for priesthood. ......I didn't understand what they meant by "forsaking" the youth.

Usually that's code for abandoning the contemporary, worldly viewpoint, including an assumed support of homosexual "marriage" and the whole nine yards.  I've noticed that anywhere there is a large youth presence in a parish (or pressure to grow one), the priests tend to water down the moral demands -- not so much preaching against doctrine as just ignoring those subjects altogether  (Wait, isn't that what most NO priests do to the other generations as well?  Answer:  Yes.)

Sometimes the priests also show a compulsion to single out for praise and "celebration"  "LGBT members" as an aspect of that pandering, but yes, I do call it pandering.
(12-31-2013, 10:38 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: [ -> ]A little blast from the past to start the new year off right. From the Wall Street Journal:





Traditional Catholicism Is Winning
There were 467 new priestly ordinations in the U.S. last year, and Boston's seminary had to turn away applicants.
By Anne Hendershott and Christopher White
April 12, 2012 7:17 p.m. ET



In his Holy Thursday homily at St. Peter's Basilica on April 5, Pope Benedict XVI denounced calls from some Catholics for optional celibacy among priests and for women's ordination. The pope said that "true renewal" comes only through the "joy of faith" and "radicalism of obedience."

And renewal is coming. After the 2002 scandal about sexual abuse by clergy, progressive Catholics were predicting the end of the celibate male priesthood in books like "Full Pews and Empty Altars" and "The Death of Priesthood." Yet today the number of priestly ordinations is steadily increasing.

A new seminary is to be built near Charlotte, N.C., and the archdiocese of Washington, D.C., has expanded its facilities to accommodate the surge in priestly candidates. Boston's Cardinal Sean Patrick O'Malley recently told the National Catholic Register that when he arrived in 2003 to lead that archdiocese he was advised to close the seminary. Now there are 70 men in Boston studying to be priests, and the seminary has had to turn away candidates for lack of space.

According to the Vatican's Central Office of Church Statistics, there were more than 5,000 more Catholic priests world-wide in 2009 than there were in 1999. This is welcome news for a growing Catholic population that has suffered through a real shortage of priests.

The situation in the U.S. is still tenuous. The number of American Catholics has grown to 77.7 million, up from 50 million in 1980. But the priest-to-parishioner ratio has changed for the worse. In 1965, there was one priest for every 780 American parishioners. By 1985, there was one priest for every 900 Catholics, and by 2011 there was one for every 2,000. In dioceses where there are few ordinations, such as New York's Rochester and Albany, people know this shortage well.

Still, the future is encouraging. There were 467 new priestly ordinations in the U.S. last year, according to a survey by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University, up from 442 a decade ago.

While some of the highest numbers of new priests are in the Catholic-majority cities of Newark, N.J., and Philadelphia, ordinations in Washington, D.C. (18 last year) and Chicago (26) also are booming. The biggest gains are not only in traditional Catholic strongholds. In Lincoln, Neb., Catholics constitute only 16% of the population yet have some of the strongest numbers of ordinations. In 2011, there were 10 men ordained as priests in Lincoln.

What explains the trend? Nearly 20 years ago, Archbishop Elden Curtiss, then leader of the Omaha, Neb., diocese, suggested that when dioceses are unambiguous and allow a minimum of dissent about the male, celibate priesthood, more candidates answer the call to the priesthood. Our preliminary research on the correlates of priestly ordinations reveals that the dioceses with the largest numbers of new priests are led by courageous bishops with faithful and inspirational vocations offices.

Leadership and adherence to church doctrine certainly distinguish the bishop of Lincoln, the Most Rev. Fabian Bruskewitz. He made national news in 1996 when he stated that members of dissident Catholic groups including Call to Action and Catholics for Choice had automatically excommunicated themselves from the church.

Cardinal Francis George, the longtime leader of the Chicago archdiocese, once gave a homily that startled the faithful by pronouncing liberal Catholicism "an exhausted project . . . parasitical on a substance that no longer exists." Declaring that Catholics are at a "turning point" in the life of the church in this country, the cardinal concluded that the bishops must stand as a "reality check for the apostolic faith."

Such forthright defense of the faith and doctrine stands in clear contrast to the emphasis of an earlier generation of Catholic theologians and historians. Many boomer priests and scholars were shaped by what they believed was an "unfulfilled promise" of Vatican II to embrace modernity. Claiming that the only salvation for the church would be to ordain women, remove the celibacy requirement and empower the laity, theologians such as Paul Lakeland, a Fairfield University professor and former Jesuit priest, have demanded that much of the teaching authority of the bishops and priests be transferred to the laity.

This aging generation of progressives continues to lobby church leaders to change Catholic teachings on reproductive rights, same-sex marriage and women's ordination. But it is being replaced by younger men and women who are attracted to the church because of the very timelessness of its teachings.

They are attracted to the philosophy, the art, the literature and the theology that make Catholicism countercultural. They are drawn to the beauty of the liturgy and the church's commitment to the dignity of the individual. They want to be contributors to that commitment—alongside faithful and courageous bishops who ask them to make sacrifices. It is time for Catholics to celebrate their arrival.

Ms. Hendershott is distinguished visiting professor at the King's College in New York. Mr. White is the international director of operations with the World Youth Alliance. They are the co-authors of the forthcoming "Beyond the Catholic Culture Wars" (Encounter Books).

Vox Wrote:
:)

Do you mean this Archdiocese of Boston?

http://throwthebumsoutin2010.blogspot.co...-holy.html
http://throwthebumsoutin2010.blogspot.co...-from.html

Yes the seminaries are full, yet the priest shortage remains. Why is that?
(01-02-2014, 09:47 PM)CaptCrunch73 Wrote: [ -> ]Do you mean this Archdiocese of Boston?

http://throwthebumsoutin2010.blogspot.co...-holy.html
http://throwthebumsoutin2010.blogspot.co...-from.html

Yes the seminaries are full, yet the priest shortage remains. Why is that?

Oh, my gosh, oh Captain, my Captain, do you ALWAYS have to be so NEGATIVE? Sticking tongue out at you

(that's a personal joke, ladies and germs. Carry on.)

(01-01-2014, 10:33 PM)Miriam_M Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-01-2014, 06:58 PM)PrairieMom Wrote: [ -> ]I think back to a conversation I had not long ago with a youngish adult in my parish. They were critical of the previous priest, a fairly traditionally-minded priest, for "forsaking" the youth in favour of grooming about a half a dozen young men to discern for priesthood. ......I didn't understand what they meant by "forsaking" the youth.

Usually that's code for abandoning the contemporary, worldly viewpoint, including an assumed support of homosexual "marriage" and the whole nine yards.  I've noticed that anywhere there is a large youth presence in a parish (or pressure to grow one), the priests tend to water down the moral demands -- not so much preaching against doctrine as just ignoring those subjects altogether  (Wait, isn't that what most NO priests do to the other generations as well?  Answer:  Yes.)

Sometimes the priests also show a compulsion to single out for praise and "celebration"  "LGBT members" as an aspect of that pandering, but yes, I do call it pandering.

Yeah. In our case, it was getting rid of LifeTeen, which quite frankly was dying anyway, and emphasising traditional practices.

But the whole teenager thing is another thread entirely. I'll stop there before I get riled up.
(01-03-2014, 12:32 AM)PrairieMom Wrote: [ -> ]Yeah. In our case, it was getting rid of LifeTeen, which quite frankly was dying anyway, and emphasising traditional practices.

But the whole teenager thing is another thread entirely. I'll stop there before I get riled up.

I'm not sure what you have in mind when referring to "the whole teenage thing" (but if you can write about it without messing yourself up, I'd LOVE to hear what you've seen!) -- but it seems to me that the Powers That Be in charge of "the youth stuff" are SO going in the wrong way. Not only in terms of catechesis that passes on the Faith intact, traditioinal liturgy (both of these being non-negotiable things, IMO), but in terms of "getting" what "young people" really want. Well, my take on what they want, anyway.  From what I can tell, they are dying for ritual, for ex. Why are Wicca and other forms of paganism so compelling to young folks?  They get to engage in ritual, build altars, acquire ceremonial implements that evoke (bogusly) a sense of ages past and of beauty.  So what do the Catholic Youth MInsters give them instead? Felt-freaking-banners and bad rock-and-roll. Huh-uh.

They are also dying (sometimes literally) to have a deep sense of meaning and of purpose, a set of beliefs that helps them make sense of the anomie they're feeling. And what do "we" give them instead? Watered-down crapola.

We all know that what they need is CHRIST -- but the Christ we present to them isn't the Christ of the Gospels, the One depicted in two millennia's worth of some of the greatest art produced by man. We give them cartoon Jesus, "Cheezus," and expect them to feel inspired. 

They want Truth -- but their minds typically haven't been formed to be able to accept it after their having been brainwashed by political correctness.  So instead of explaining it all to them so it makes logical sense, in a way that "speaks to them" and that they can understand completely, in a way that breaks through all their politically correct indoctrination, "we" cave and applaud when they protest, wanting to use the forces of democracy to change a non-democratic institution ("well, at least they're not just playing Nintendo!").  And it'd all have to be done without the hyperbolic language some Catholics engage in --- that sort of "Reefer Madness" approach to trying to get them to refrain from sin.

Catechists are doing EVERYTHING 100% wrong when it comes to engaging kids, if you ask me. Along with sound doctrine and liturgy, they should be focusing on the aspects of Catholicism that -- I hate to have to go here, but I think it's important, given how teenage minds tend to think -- aspects that are "cool."  The altar building, the use of Latin, Gregorian chant, things that make them feel a part of something so much bigger than they are, something ancient.  They want nothing to do with "the Protestant Jesus" in terms of aesthetics; they don't want to be associated with folks who are perceived as backward, scientifically ignorant, and, above all, judgmental (that last being something trads need to check when dealing with young folks). Even little things like referring to Our Lord as "the Ancient of Days" would appeal to teenagers so much more than their hearing His Holy Name which has been sooooooooo associated with blasphemy and cheeziness. I, a Catholic with a special devotion to the Holy Name, can sometimes hear that Name and hear the voice of one of those televangelists who pronounce it "JEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE-zuz." Even referring to Him as Iesus or Ieus -- little hings that a well-formed, catechized mind wouldn't let bother them can be turn-offs to teenagers who are -- well, they're teenagers. Enough said.

I say, give them sound catechesis and traditional sacramental rites -- and the "cool" things like St. John's Eve bonfires, Twelfthnight parties, the "triduum of the Dead," memento mori, Walpurgisnacht, exposure to the works of Albert Magnus, the natural history and herbology of St. Hildegard, home rituals that involve candles and incense -- IOW, everything traditional that even a lot of trads overlook but which I believe has the power to attract the teenaged imagination.  Teaching them the History of Science with regard to Catholicism, and explaining to them why "Scientism" is a ridiculous approach to life is imperative. Also, focusing on works of charity -- getting them involved in SERVICE to others is a BIGGIE, in my estimation. While having a place they can play some B-ball is fine and good (heck yeah! Kids need to just socialize, have some fun, meet each other so they have friends in the Faith to help support them), getting them to focus outward, onto others, will help give them "self-esteem" that is deserved and help them to become truly virtuous. 

All of this catechizing for "teens" would be best done by folks who remember what it's like to have been one -- but who don't fall into the trap of thinking they have to act like one to get their attention (Christ, spare us!). It'd best be done by people with lots of empathy, who understand the value of "emotional affirmation." And it should be people with a tremendous sense of beauty, maybe with a little flair for the dramatic, and a great sense of humor.

I can imagine what some might be thinking:  the Faith is about more than THAT -- about looking "cool" and having "cool" ritual implements. And that is one THOUSAND percent true. But, as I've said before, we've got to meet folks where they're at so they will even START to look in the right place -- i.e., Holy Mother Church. Once they're looking our way, the Holy Ghost can take over, and they can be opened up to receiving the supernatural gift of faith.

I Corinthians 9:13-23
For if I preach the gospel, it is no glory to me, for a necessity lieth upon me: for woe is unto me if I preach not the gospel.  For if I do this thing willingly, I have a reward: but if against my will, a dispensation is committed to me:  What is my reward then? That preaching the gospel, I may deliver the gospel without charge, that I abuse not my power in the gospel.  For whereas I was free as to all, I made myself the servant of all, that I might gain the more.  And I became to the Jews, a Jew, that I might gain the Jews:  To them that are under the law, as if I were under the law, (whereas myself was not under the law,) that I might gain them that were under the law. To them that were without the law, as if I were without the law, (whereas I was not without the law of God, but was in the law of Christ,) that I might gain them that were without the law.  To the weak I became weak, that I might gain the weak. I became all things to all men, that I might save all.  And I do all things for the gospel's sake: that I may be made partaker thereof.


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