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Full Version: Apparitions of our Blessed Mother & approval. Rosa Mystica, is it approved?
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I have heard, read different things regarding the Rosa Mystica alleged apparition. Is it approved? Do trads like & follow this apparition? What do you know about it?
What about the apparition in Wisconsin? Any information on this.Thanks.
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(01-14-2014, 05:39 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]What for do we need more apparitionsHuh? Don't Catholics have God Himself in the Eucharist?? What else do they need?? Ego sum Dóminus et non est alius!!
(01-14-2014, 05:40 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-14-2014, 05:39 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]What for do we need more apparitionsHuh? Don't Catholics have God Himself in the Eucharist?? What else do they need?? Ego sum Dóminus et non est alius!!

I would like more apparitions.
Thanks for starting this thread. As a matter of fact I was going to start a similar as well. My aunt is big on the Rosa Mystica devotion and she bought me a rosary that is supposed to be based on the Rosa Mystica apparition.

[Image: rosaryrosamystica_zps814caae3.jpg]

It is a unique rosary and kind of weird at the same time. It is weird in the fact that it does not contain 10 Hail Mary's but 7 instead. It also does not contain 5 Our Fathers but 7 as well.

I was wondering if this was a Church approved devotion and what Trads think about it.
(01-14-2014, 09:43 PM)ArturoOrtiz Wrote: [ -> ]Thanks for starting this thread. As a matter of fact I was going to start a similar as well. My aunt is big on the Rosa Mystica devotion and she bought me a rosary that is supposed to be based on the Rosa Mystica apparition.

[Image: rosaryrosamystica_zps814caae3.jpg]

It is a unique rosary and kind of weird at the same time. It is weird in the fact that it does not contain 10 Hail Mary's but 7 instead. It also does not contain 5 Our Fathers but 7 as well.

I was wondering if this was a Church approved devotion and what Trads think about it.
The rosary of seven beads on each decade with seven decades is known as the rosary of the seven sorrows. It is approved and there are indulgences attached to its recitatio. I don't know anything about the Rosa Mystica apparitions or its status in the Catholic Church. 
(01-14-2014, 05:40 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-14-2014, 05:39 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]What for do we need more apparitionsHuh? Don't Catholics have God Himself in the Eucharist?? What else do they need?? Ego sum Dóminus et non est alius!!

Excellent point. We don't need them and Rosa Mystica is not approved like so many. If God was really at work He would get the thing approved. Fatima is worthwhile.
John Zmirak on why we crave them:
"There’s another, sadder reason why we crave signs and wonders, skipping lightly over works of mercy or Eucharistic adoration to go visit some dubious site of the Blessed Virgin’s Twitter account: We aren’t sure God exists. We don’t fully believe in the afterlife, or spiritual beings, and we’d really like some proof in the form of a miracle that we aren’t deluding ourselves.  The ex-Catholic William Alexander Percy (uncle of the great author Walker) recounted in Lanterns on the Levee how his father reacted to a ghost story. The old man said that he would crawl on his hands and knees through the desert for the chance to meet a ghost.

When we line up alongside the Telemundo trucks to see the quesadilla with Jesus’ face, each of us is doing the same: Begging for evidence that the spiritual world exists, that the life we are slogging through is not a “snuff” farce whose curtain drops with the grave. When we really go off the rails, we might find ourselves sneaking into séances, or asking young women from California to teach us how to “channel.” In search of the shadow of God, we can plunge into a darkness that’s all too real.

A Trad seminarian I knew from New York City became convinced by an autodidact in biblical prophecy and apparitions. The “prophet,” whom I'll call “Ed,” spoke in an almost constant stream of profanities like a Martin Scorcese character, but he wore a full-body scapular sewn with hundreds of first-class relics, so he was clearly on to something. Ed swore, among other things, that the Third Secret of Fatima was a save-the-date note predicting the Second Coming… on Oct. 13, 1994. “Our Lady's gonna let her divine Son tear this planet a new one,” Ed said with an equable smile. His disciple, my friend, dropped out of the seminary and moved back in with his mother to wait for the End. I waited too—for Oct. 14, 1994, on which date I phoned this seminarian at the office to point out, “That was subtle.”

And that’s the point, really. Life is subtle. And muddled, and often tiresome and dull. So we look for a little pizzaz, some special effects from heaven, in the hope that some god or machine will step in and wrap it all up for us in a shiny, dramatic bow.  Which really does miss the point: Each one of us faces an unavoidable Apocalypse and Judgment within (at most) the next 70 years. Do we really need a stronger goad than that?"

http://www.aleteia.org/en/religion/docum...cow-225006

C.

(01-15-2014, 07:01 AM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-14-2014, 05:40 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-14-2014, 05:39 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]What for do we need more apparitionsHuh? Don't Catholics have God Himself in the Eucharist?? What else do they need?? Ego sum Dóminus et non est alius!!

Excellent point. We don't need them and Rosa Mystica is not approved like so many. If God was really at work He would get the thing approved. Fatima is worthwhile.
John Zmirak on why we crave them:
"There’s another, sadder reason why we crave signs and wonders, skipping lightly over works of mercy or Eucharistic adoration to go visit some dubious site of the Blessed Virgin’s Twitter account: We aren’t sure God exists. We don’t fully believe in the afterlife, or spiritual beings, and we’d really like some proof in the form of a miracle that we aren’t deluding ourselves.  The ex-Catholic William Alexander Percy (uncle of the great author Walker) recounted in Lanterns on the Levee how his father reacted to a ghost story. The old man said that he would crawl on his hands and knees through the desert for the chance to meet a ghost.

When we line up alongside the Telemundo trucks to see the quesadilla with Jesus’ face, each of us is doing the same: Begging for evidence that the spiritual world exists, that the life we are slogging through is not a “snuff” farce whose curtain drops with the grave. When we really go off the rails, we might find ourselves sneaking into séances, or asking young women from California to teach us how to “channel.” In search of the shadow of God, we can plunge into a darkness that’s all too real.

A Trad seminarian I knew from New York City became convinced by an autodidact in biblical prophecy and apparitions. The “prophet,” whom I'll call “Ed,” spoke in an almost constant stream of profanities like a Martin Scorcese character, but he wore a full-body scapular sewn with hundreds of first-class relics, so he was clearly on to something. Ed swore, among other things, that the Third Secret of Fatima was a save-the-date note predicting the Second Coming… on Oct. 13, 1994. “Our Lady's gonna let her divine Son tear this planet a new one,” Ed said with an equable smile. His disciple, my friend, dropped out of the seminary and moved back in with his mother to wait for the End. I waited too—for Oct. 14, 1994, on which date I phoned this seminarian at the office to point out, “That was subtle.”

And that’s the point, really. Life is subtle. And muddled, and often tiresome and dull. So we look for a little pizzaz, some special effects from heaven, in the hope that some god or machine will step in and wrap it all up for us in a shiny, dramatic bow.  Which really does miss the point: Each one of us faces an unavoidable Apocalypse and Judgment within (at most) the next 70 years. Do we really need a stronger goad than that?"

http://www.aleteia.org/en/religion/docum...cow-225006

C.


It's not an excellent point in the context it was made, it's a pompous and superior one, and sounds remarkably familiar to many Protestant arguments. There was no statement put forward that an apparition was 'needed' to restore faith, needed as a condition of believing, or that frivolous apparitions were being pursued.

As much as everyone is entitled to their opinion, It is haughty to rebuke the query for information on an open forum because you disagree with the question, much like the scientist who lectures a criticism on their peer because they don't see the same conclusion, emphasized with the incredulity of multiple question marks as it was.

Marian apparitions have led millions to the church, and have bestowed abundant graces upon the many through devotion to the Rosary, the formation of Marian Societies, the brown scapular and the miraculous medal. Every time that I hear about a suspected Marian apparition under legitimate investigation, I desire to know if it fact it may be another wonderful example of the supernatural manifesting itself within our church.  If that makes me a poor catholic, then I humbly submit that I am.  But not all catholics are looking for the primer in the Virgins face on the side of a building to calculate the hand of doom falling on mankind, or as a condition of belief.

To answer your question Deogratias, Rosa Mystica is not approved by the church. I will inbox you a few good sites for info.


(01-15-2014, 09:59 AM)The Tax Collector Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-15-2014, 07:01 AM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-14-2014, 05:40 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-14-2014, 05:39 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]What for do we need more apparitionsHuh? Don't Catholics have God Himself in the Eucharist?? What else do they need?? Ego sum Dóminus et non est alius!!

Excellent point. We don't need them and Rosa Mystica is not approved like so many. If God was really at work He would get the thing approved. Fatima is worthwhile.
John Zmirak on why we crave them:
"There’s another, sadder reason why we crave signs and wonders, skipping lightly over works of mercy or Eucharistic adoration to go visit some dubious site of the Blessed Virgin’s Twitter account: We aren’t sure God exists. We don’t fully believe in the afterlife, or spiritual beings, and we’d really like some proof in the form of a miracle that we aren’t deluding ourselves.  The ex-Catholic William Alexander Percy (uncle of the great author Walker) recounted in Lanterns on the Levee how his father reacted to a ghost story. The old man said that he would crawl on his hands and knees through the desert for the chance to meet a ghost.

When we line up alongside the Telemundo trucks to see the quesadilla with Jesus’ face, each of us is doing the same: Begging for evidence that the spiritual world exists, that the life we are slogging through is not a “snuff” farce whose curtain drops with the grave. When we really go off the rails, we might find ourselves sneaking into séances, or asking young women from California to teach us how to “channel.” In search of the shadow of God, we can plunge into a darkness that’s all too real.

A Trad seminarian I knew from New York City became convinced by an autodidact in biblical prophecy and apparitions. The “prophet,” whom I'll call “Ed,” spoke in an almost constant stream of profanities like a Martin Scorcese character, but he wore a full-body scapular sewn with hundreds of first-class relics, so he was clearly on to something. Ed swore, among other things, that the Third Secret of Fatima was a save-the-date note predicting the Second Coming… on Oct. 13, 1994. “Our Lady's gonna let her divine Son tear this planet a new one,” Ed said with an equable smile. His disciple, my friend, dropped out of the seminary and moved back in with his mother to wait for the End. I waited too—for Oct. 14, 1994, on which date I phoned this seminarian at the office to point out, “That was subtle.”

And that’s the point, really. Life is subtle. And muddled, and often tiresome and dull. So we look for a little pizzaz, some special effects from heaven, in the hope that some god or machine will step in and wrap it all up for us in a shiny, dramatic bow.  Which really does miss the point: Each one of us faces an unavoidable Apocalypse and Judgment within (at most) the next 70 years. Do we really need a stronger goad than that?"

http://www.aleteia.org/en/religion/docum...cow-225006

C.


It's not an excellent point in the context it was made, it's a pompous and superior one, and sounds remarkably familiar to many Protestant arguments. There was no statement put forward that an apparition was 'needed' to restore faith, needed as a condition of believing, or that frivolous apparitions were being pursued.

As much as everyone is entitled to their opinion, It is haughty to rebuke the query for information on an open forum because you disagree with the question, much like the scientist who lectures a criticism on their peer because they don't see the same conclusion, emphasized with the incredulity of multiple question marks as it was.

Marian apparitions have led millions to the church, and have bestowed abundant graces upon the many through devotion to the Rosary, the formation of Marian Societies, the brown scapular and the miraculous medal. Every time that I hear about a suspected Marian apparition under legitimate investigation, I desire to know if it fact it may be another wonderful example of the supernatural manifesting itself within our church.  If that makes me a poor catholic, then I humbly submit that I am.  But not all catholics are looking for the primer in the Virgins face on the side of a building to calculate the hand of doom falling on mankind, or as a condition of belief.

To answer your question Deogratias, Rosa Mystica is not approved by the church. I will inbox you a few good sites for info.

Thanks so much, I appreciate & look forward to the links. I know someone who keeps insisting that it is approved & they have the book to prove it.....I need to show her the links. I remember seeing a Priest blessing a statue for a lady at Church, So, its confusing.
(01-15-2014, 09:59 AM)The Tax Collector Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-15-2014, 07:01 AM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-14-2014, 05:40 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-14-2014, 05:39 PM)voltape Wrote: [ -> ]What for do we need more apparitionsHuh? Don't Catholics have God Himself in the Eucharist?? What else do they need?? Ego sum Dóminus et non est alius!!

Excellent point. We don't need them and Rosa Mystica is not approved like so many. If God was really at work He would get the thing approved. Fatima is worthwhile.
John Zmirak on why we crave them:
"There’s another, sadder reason why we crave signs and wonders, skipping lightly over works of mercy or Eucharistic adoration to go visit some dubious site of the Blessed Virgin’s Twitter account: We aren’t sure God exists. We don’t fully believe in the afterlife, or spiritual beings, and we’d really like some proof in the form of a miracle that we aren’t deluding ourselves.  The ex-Catholic William Alexander Percy (uncle of the great author Walker) recounted in Lanterns on the Levee how his father reacted to a ghost story. The old man said that he would crawl on his hands and knees through the desert for the chance to meet a ghost.

When we line up alongside the Telemundo trucks to see the quesadilla with Jesus’ face, each of us is doing the same: Begging for evidence that the spiritual world exists, that the life we are slogging through is not a “snuff” farce whose curtain drops with the grave. When we really go off the rails, we might find ourselves sneaking into séances, or asking young women from California to teach us how to “channel.” In search of the shadow of God, we can plunge into a darkness that’s all too real.

A Trad seminarian I knew from New York City became convinced by an autodidact in biblical prophecy and apparitions. The “prophet,” whom I'll call “Ed,” spoke in an almost constant stream of profanities like a Martin Scorcese character, but he wore a full-body scapular sewn with hundreds of first-class relics, so he was clearly on to something. Ed swore, among other things, that the Third Secret of Fatima was a save-the-date note predicting the Second Coming… on Oct. 13, 1994. “Our Lady's gonna let her divine Son tear this planet a new one,” Ed said with an equable smile. His disciple, my friend, dropped out of the seminary and moved back in with his mother to wait for the End. I waited too—for Oct. 14, 1994, on which date I phoned this seminarian at the office to point out, “That was subtle.”

And that’s the point, really. Life is subtle. And muddled, and often tiresome and dull. So we look for a little pizzaz, some special effects from heaven, in the hope that some god or machine will step in and wrap it all up for us in a shiny, dramatic bow.  Which really does miss the point: Each one of us faces an unavoidable Apocalypse and Judgment within (at most) the next 70 years. Do we really need a stronger goad than that?"

http://www.aleteia.org/en/religion/docum...cow-225006

C.


It's not an excellent point in the context it was made, it's a pompous and superior one, and sounds remarkably familiar to many Protestant arguments. There was no statement put forward that an apparition was 'needed' to restore faith, needed as a condition of believing, or that frivolous apparitions were being pursued.

As much as everyone is entitled to their opinion, It is haughty to rebuke the query for information on an open forum because you disagree with the question, much like the scientist who lectures a criticism on their peer because they don't see the same conclusion, emphasized with the incredulity of multiple question marks as it was.

Marian apparitions have led millions to the church, and have bestowed abundant graces upon the many through devotion to the Rosary, the formation of Marian Societies, the brown scapular and the miraculous medal. Every time that I hear about a suspected Marian apparition under legitimate investigation, I desire to know if it fact it may be another wonderful example of the supernatural manifesting itself within our church.  If that makes me a poor catholic, then I humbly submit that I am.  But not all catholics are looking for the primer in the Virgins face on the side of a building to calculate the hand of doom falling on mankind, or as a condition of belief.

To answer your question Deogratias, Rosa Mystica is not approved by the church. I will inbox you a few good sites for info.

It is an excellent point in the sense that it was made that we don't need apparitions, we already have the most important thing which is what voltape was saying. The quest of apparitions is leading many astray as with the lunacy of "Maria Divine Mercy" in Ireland and Medjugorje. Some rely heavily on these things, and may lose their faith in the end when they realize they are victims of a fraud. The wise counsel of St. John of the Cross and  many others remains quite valid.

C.
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