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It is very common in Traditionalist circles to insist on the fasting and abstinence rules in effect in the 1950s, as opposed to the minimalism instituted by Paul VI.  Most trads do not know, however, that the fasting and abstinence rules of the early 20th Century are themselves greatly mitigated compared to the traditional practice..  Here is the older rule, which is very similar to current Eastern Orthodox practice:

The Western Lenten Fast

People have often admired the rigorous approach to fasting taken by the Eastern Churches. Our Western custom was once similar, but was diminished principally during the two world wars and further following the Second Vatican Council.

These fasts are no longer of precept, of course, but that doesn't mean that their use wouldn't be spiritually fruitful.

This applies particularly in Lent. The Western Lenten fast is as follows:

The Lenten Fast

All weekdays of Lent are days of fasting and abstinence. That means one single meal. Two lighter meals may be taken as long as their combined quantity does not exceed that of the single meal.
Meat may not be eaten, nor, I understand, fish, though I may be corrected on this. I presume it (and remember reading it somewhere, but I can't find it) on account of fish being specified as permitted on Sunday.

Traditionally, the abstinence also forbids eggs and all dairy products, the so-called 'black fast'. (perhaps because of the milkless tea). This had ceased to be of obligation by the nineteenth century.
In practice, this means observing a vegan diet during the week.

Oil may be used (unlike in the east) to cook or dress food at all times.

Sundays in Lent are days of abstinence, but not fasting. Therefore the normal quantities of food may be eaten, but not meat. Fish is permitted.

Fasting and abstinence are only lifted should the day be a Holy Day of Obligation. I don't think any holy days would fall within Lent these days.

Days of Fasting outside Lent

In addition, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays during Ember weeks are days of fasting. Ember weeks are the first week in Lent, (fasting anyway), the Octave of Pentecost, The third week in September and the third week in Advent.

The vigils of the following feasts are days of fasting: Pentecost, Ss Peter & Paul, the Assumption, All Saints, and Christmas Day.

All Wednesdays and Fridays in Advent are fast days.

Should a fast day fall on a Sunday, it is observed on the Saturday. Should a feast fall on a Monday, the fast is also observed on the Saturday.

The only exception to the Friday abstinence traditionally was if Christmas day should fall on a Friday.


http://valleadurni.blogspot.com/2014/02/...-fast.html

It is true--the lessening of fasting and abstinence is in continuity with how the Church was trending for centuries.  See this book below written in 1895. Start on page 344 and read section 7 and 8, ending on page 347 (they're short pages). It's the author's (who worked in the curia under St. Pius X and later became a Cardinal) attempt to answer why indulgences are so easy primarily, but he also addresses light penances and minimal fasting, less duty to attend Mass on holy days, etc.in stark contrast to earlier time periods.  First he says its presumptuous to question the Church, but then dares to offer some suggestions.

http://archive.org/stream/cu319240293990...7/mode/2up

At each stage of the mitigation of fasting rules, the Church commends the former practice while simultaneously relaxing the severity of the previous rules.  I think there are two lessons to be drawn from this:

1.  It is a laudable thing to imitate previous generations of Catholics (to the extend that it is practical to do so) by following the older fasting practices, such as abstaining from meat for all of Lent, or abstaining from fish, eggs and dairy products on Lenten weekdays.

2.  It is not appropriate for trads to judge people who follow the post-Vatican II minimalist fasting and abstinence rules, because the rules trads follow are themselves pretty lax compared to the ones followed for most of Christian history.
I know most Orthodox don't actually follow the strict fasting requirements but they are still there as the standard by which one is to judge oneself. Even in the most liberal Orthodox parishes the liturgy is offered ad orientem, the communion fast is strict from midnight (with no water even) and the majority of the Church year is spent (ideally) fasting. I think the West should return to a more strict fast, even if its just a standard to measure ourselves by.
We also have 5pm Masses and 7pm Masses now... i dont think that was common before Vatican II.  my wife often goes to a 6pm Mass after work so I am glad that the rule isn't in place that you have to fast after midnight. 

How old does a child have to be before they have to fast before Mass?  is it only if you are going to receive Holy Communion?  I always adhered to the 1 hour rule when I was able to eat because of my diabetes and I am guessing it will be better for my son to do it that way now.  Our Sunday Mass is 12:30pm and that is a long time to go without food.

my wife and my son both eat mostly paleo so I am not sure how that would work with such a restriction.  It was more common back then to rely on grains and legumes in the diet
(02-23-2014, 03:27 AM)Chestertonian Wrote: [ -> ]We also have 5pm Masses and 7pm Masses now... i dont think that was common before Vatican II.  my wife often goes to a 6pm Mass after work so I am glad that the rule isn't in place that you have to fast after midnight. 

How old does a child have to be before they have to fast before Mass?  is it only if you are going to receive Holy Communion?  I always adhered to the 1 hour rule when I was able to eat because of my diabetes and I am guessing it will be better for my son to do it that way now.  Our Sunday Mass is 12:30pm and that is a long time to go without food.

my wife and my son both eat mostly paleo so I am not sure how that would work with such a restriction.  It was more common back then to rely on grains and legumes in the diet

A person, be they child or adult, is not required to fast if not receiving Holy Communion. Further, if there is a medical issue, the fast is dispensed.

http://catholicism.about.com/od/thesacra...munion.htm

Since you find yourself in an unusual situation I would suggest clarifying with your priest.