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This link will take you to some images from San Vitale, but you can just google-images San Vitale and get lots better.
They also have the St, Lawrence mosaic here, but I find the color off. I will look for a better image of this.

http://walkinginthecountry.blogspot.ca/2...venna.html


Here's St. Lawrence

https://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/ital...a/0013.jpg

Wow, maldon. That is really excellent. It is lovely to see a Byzantine-style mosaic with a Western saint. The Orthodox still commemorate Ambrose, Hilary of Poitiers, and others, of course. Interestingly they're not mentioned much, even though they're 700+ years before the great schism.

Vesting of a bishop for a hierarchical liturgy in the slavic cult:



Note the similarity in form and structure to a Solemn High Pontifical Mass. The single difference is that the bishop vests before all, rather than in a side-chapel or other place. No cappa magna either. Sorry, Western trads... Eastern trads like their bishops black and monastic.
(03-21-2014, 06:23 AM)Heorot Wrote: [ -> ]The Orthodox still commemorate Ambrose, Hilary of Poitiers, and others, of course. Interestingly they're not mentioned much, even though they're 700+ years before the great schism.

I'm sure that's chiefly due to the fact that when the liturgy developed into distinct families, each tended to venerate only local feasts; Rome, being ultraconservative in liturgy until the 13th century, only celebrated saints' feasts over their actual tombs, gradually admitting feasts to churches named after the saint, and only later were these extended more widely. A look at the Roman calendar shows a distinctly local character as well - the vast bulk of the 1st-millennium saints are Roman martyrs. Very few archbishops of Constantinople!

I have been gaining an appreciation for the Eastern approach to many things. It seems there is often a more holistic approach to theology, rather than the fine categorization of Scholasticism. One doesn't have to disparage the one to appreciate the other - they offer a nice check on the excesses of each other. I also appreciate the medicinal imagery of sin and repentance more than the legal imagery of the West. Again, neither conception is totally alien to either tradition, and they are good counter-balances.
Aquinas138 said:
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I have been gaining an appreciation for the Eastern approach to many things. It seems there is often a more holistic approach to theology, rather than the fine categorization of Scholasticism. One doesn't have to disparage the one to appreciate the other - they offer a nice check on the excesses of each other. I also appreciate the medicinal imagery of sin and repentance more than the legal imagery of the West. Again, neither conception is totally alien to either tradition, and they are good counter-balances.
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This is an excellent point Aquinas. I find the two approaches compliment each other.
Not the least bit in conflict, but with different points of emphasis that still bring
one to the same holy place they need to get to/be.....................

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St Raymond of Penafort, pray for us............
His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI during his visit to Lebanon. 
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Blessed Pope John Paul II wearing the vestments of the Syro Malabar Catholic Church.

[Image: PopeJohnPaulII_SyroMalabarVestments-1.jpg]
His Holiness Pope Francis during a Divine Liturgy while he was Archbishop of Buenos Aires.


[Image: 59225_452289311515949_387135902_n.jpg]
(03-20-2014, 08:39 PM)Heorot Wrote: [ -> ]Funny, whenever I see churches like Sant'Apollinare nuovo in Ravenna, I get the impression that back then the Church breathed with just one lung - or rather, that it breathed with two lungs, which were both Eastern.

The Preface and Anaphora ("canon") of the Eastern Catholic Mass celebrated by a bishop:



As beautiful as the chanted Preface to the Roman Canon is, this is absolutely haunting.

Now THAT is hauntingly beautiful. One of the best features of Eastern worship is the lack of musical instruments. The human voice is supreme. Not that I'm against instruments in the liturgy, but I have a strong aversion to the moaning groaning droning pipe organ, which, for some strange reason, the Western Church thinks is the epitome of beauty and reverence. Bleh.
I LOVE those pictures of the popes, especially Pope Benedict with the blessing candles!
Bravo, CatholicLife. I agree with 2HearsServant about Benedict. I love the symbolism of the 2 candles (Christ's human and divine nature) and the 3 candles (the holy Trinity).

Interesting fact: some Byzantine Catholic thuribles (which you often hear jingling in the divine liturgy) have 13 bells on them, for the Apostles and Judas. 12 of the bells ring, but the 13th bell is dead and just clangs. Little traditions like this are so beautiful.

I agree with you, StrictCatholicGirl. Gregorian chant is haunting and enchanting precisely for this reason. The same goes for organum, ars nova, Palestrina, and Byzantine chant too. We are moved by this because we hear mirrors of ourselves in other human beings, and so we hear the image and likeness of God singing. No machines! No inventions! Only the icon of God!
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