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I found it here, but it's an SP article. http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/world/b...52121.html

BOSTON -- New scientific tests suggest a fragment of papyrus in which Jesus speaks of "my wife" is more likely an ancient document than a forgery, an article published Thursday by the Harvard Theological Review reports.

The text, which is written in Coptic and is roughly the size of a business card, specifically contains the phrase "Jesus said to them, My wife."

Karen King, a Harvard professor of divinity, said the papyrus probably dates to eighth-century Egypt, based on radiocarbon dating and tests on the ink's chemical composition.

"If it was written in the eighth or even the ninth century, it's still an ancient document," she said in a conference call Thursday. "It's not a modern forgery."

But, she stressed, the fragment doesn't prove the historical Jesus was married. Most reliable evidence from early Christianity is silent on Jesus' marital status, King added.

If anything, she said, the papyrus provides insight into early Christianity's debates over family life.

"Early Christians were extremely interested in whether or not they should marry or be celibate or whether it was OK to have a family or whether one should remain virginal," King said.

King said the papyrus, which contains about eight partial lines of text, appears to make the case mothers and wives can be disciples. Jesus references his mother, wife, and another female as his disciples apparently discuss whether a woman -- identified as "Mary" -- can join their ranks.

According to King's translation, the text then reads "Jesus said to them, My wife..." That is followed in the next line by "... she is able to be my disciple..."

King originally revealed existence of the papyrus in 2012. Calling it the "Gospel of Jesus's Wife," her announcement sparked debate among religious and ancient scholars. But publication of her findings was delayed for the tests. King maintains the "gospel" moniker was appropriate.

While the papyrus is too small to discern anything definitive about who composed it, King argued Thursday the text belongs to a body of ancient texts that illuminate facets of Jesus' life. "It contains a dialogue between Jesus and his disciples," she said. "That would normally put it in the category of gospel."

King hopes the research puts to rest questions about the text's authenticity.

But Brown University Professor Leo Depuydt, in an analysis also published Thursday by the Harvard Theological Review, was not convinced. He said the text contains grammatical errors a native Coptic speaker would not make.
Check the Comments here.  http://www.patheos.com/blogs/godandthema...till-fake/

The fragment is very likely a fake.
(04-11-2014, 12:34 PM)PrairieMom Wrote: [ -> ]According to King's translation, the text then reads "Jesus said to them, My wife..." That is followed in the next line by "... she is able to be my disciple..."

"finally, proof of woman priests and pope joan. stuff that in your mitre, patriarches!"

                                                                     -mother o'callaghan

[Image: bv135_Florida.jpg]






More nonsense...just in time for Holy Week. It happens every year!
This thing surfaced 18 months ago and is again coming up.  Crap scholarship should have landed ths professor on unemployment, not in a TV special.
(04-11-2014, 12:34 PM)PrairieMom Wrote: [ -> ]King said the papyrus, which contains about eight partial lines of text, appears to make the case mothers and wives can be disciples. Jesus references his mother, wife, and another female as his disciples apparently discuss whether a woman -- identified as "Mary" -- can join their ranks.

According to King's translation, the text then reads "Jesus said to them, My wife..." That is followed in the next line by "... she is able to be my disciple..."

This will no doubt excite those who love to think our Lord was married to Mary Magdalene. I was sitting in sociology class one day and the professor(who always brought up the bible to challenge it)asked the class, "Who here thinks Jesus was married?" One girl in my class(who professed to be pro-communist)raised her hand. Most people will probably eat this stuff up because they're just looking for anything to discredit Christianity.
The article by Depuydt strikes me as convincing - Coptic is my minor language in grad school, so it's interesting to read his grammatical arguments. I don't know that it's a slam dunk that it's a modern forgery, based purely on the mistakes, but its relevance to the theological concerns of modern agitators indicates that it probably is.

But to me, even if it were determined that it was a fresh composition written in the first years that Sahidic Coptic existed, it still does not mean very much with regard to the question of Jesus' putative marriage. Surviving Coptic literature is filled with strange documents produced by groups holding eclectic, and to our minds, strange religious beliefs. If it came from a Gnostic or Manichean source, you'd need to be sure the document is even referring to the historical, alive-on-the-earth Jesus, and not some other entity such as "Jesus Splendens" (who lives in the moon and is the source of the Manichean "Light-Mind") or "Jesus Patibilis" (another name for the "Cross of Light" trapped in matter).

Just another thing with which to take a jab at the Church around Holy Week and Easter. *Yawn.*
It really bugs me though that this hasn't been tossed out as sensationalist garbage.  Who announces a find like this without vetting it thoroughly? 
(04-11-2014, 04:30 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]It really bugs me though that this hasn't been tossed out as sensationalist garbage.  Who announces a find like this without vetting it thoroughly? 

Evidently, anyone who likes the idea that the early Church was proto-feminist/proto-marxist hippie drum circle.

Which is to say, most of the media.
Well, and even if it's 8th century Egypt, and even if it's really, really old...

... doesn't make it true!

Yeesh.

Catholics... fighting hearsay since 33 AD.
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