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This Wikipedia article is confusing. It states he received Catholic priestly ordination, even though he had not previously been ordained deacon. Apparently John Paul II sanctioned this. The priest in question was formerly an Anglican cleric. Does this imply John Paul II affirmed the validity of the Anglican Diaconate?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graham_Leonard

It states he was conditionally ordained to the priesthood. The basis of this was an Old Catholic co-consecrator at his Anglican episcopal consecration. That doesn't make any sense. I am confused.
No he didn't look St JPII pontificate was bad enough people don't need to make stuff up.
(05-22-2014, 11:02 PM)Unum Sint Wrote: [ -> ]No he didn't look St JPII pontificate was bad enough people don't need to make stuff up.

I am not making any stuff up. Your tone is accusatory. This is a Traditional Catholic forum and I am seeking an explanation from other users for this blatantly inaccurate Wikipedia article:

Hence, I said: "This doesn't make sense" (Implying I don't think it is true)

Also, I used a question mark in the thread title. ?

When I said "apparently JPII sanctioned this", I should have written "according to the article JPII sanctioned this", because that is what I meant.

Also, I don't like how you used the word "look", I found it cocky.
(05-22-2014, 08:22 PM)Miles Immaculatae Wrote: [ -> ]This Wikipedia article is confusing. It states he received Catholic priestly ordination, even though he had not previously been ordained deacon. Apparently John Paul II sanctioned this. The priest in question was formerly an Anglican cleric. Does this imply John Paul II affirmed the validity of the Anglican Diaconate?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graham_Leonard

It states he was conditionally ordained to the priesthood. The basis of this was an Old Catholic co-consecrator at his Anglican episcopal consecration. That doesn't make any sense. I am confused.
No. But what happened is that when Pope Leo declared on the invalidity of the Anglican orders a number of Anglican bishops sought out Old Catholic bishops and were ordained in a way that was valid. This throws into question the validity of some of the Anglican ordinations. A conditional ordination means that there is a possibility that the original ordination was valid.
technically, and don't quote me on this, but you don't need to be a deacon to become a priest as they are two separate offices.  In Canon Law, there is such thing as dispensation from a requirement, there can be many justifications for dispensing with a requirement.  Whether it was prudent to give a dispensation or to have a "conditional" ordination, that is debatable.  It doesn't mean the validity of Anglican are true.  Now when the Anglican orders were declared null and void, many bishops in the Anglican Church sought out ordination under the Old Catholic Church, to you know stick it to the Pope.  But I haven't seen too many clerics that have looked favorably on this.
(05-22-2014, 11:53 PM)Poche Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-22-2014, 08:22 PM)Miles Immaculatae Wrote: [ -> ]This Wikipedia article is confusing. It states he received Catholic priestly ordination, even though he had not previously been ordained deacon. Apparently John Paul II sanctioned this. The priest in question was formerly an Anglican cleric. Does this imply John Paul II affirmed the validity of the Anglican Diaconate?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graham_Leonard

It states he was conditionally ordained to the priesthood. The basis of this was an Old Catholic co-consecrator at his Anglican episcopal consecration. That doesn't make any sense. I am confused.
No. But what happened is that when Pope Leo declared on the invalidity of the Anglican orders a number of Anglican bishops sought out Old Catholic bishops and were ordained in a way that was valid. This throws into question the validity of some of the Anglican ordinations. A conditional ordination means that there is a possibility that the original ordination was valid.

By the 1960's a majority of Anglican ordinations in the UK had the so-called "Dutch touch" to ensure proper apostolic succession.
(05-23-2014, 12:09 AM)AntoniusMaximus Wrote: [ -> ]technically, and don't quote me on this, but you don't need to be a deacon to become a priest as they are two separate offices.  In Canon Law, there is such thing as dispensation from a requirement, there can be many justifications for dispensing with a requirement.  Whether it was prudent to give a dispensation or to have a "conditional" ordination, that is debatable.  It doesn't mean the validity of Anglican are true.  Now when the Anglican orders were declared null and void, many bishops in the Anglican Church sought out ordination under the Old Catholic Church, to you know stick it to the Pope.  But I haven't seen too many clerics that have looked favorably on this.
My impression is that they didn't do it to "stick it to the Pope." They did it as a back-handed recognition of his authority as Pope to make the determination as to the validity of their orders.  
I wish everyone would stop worrying about the damn Anglicans that church is nearly dead all the people are joining the Evangelical Fundamentalist churches, god im soo sick of hearing Catholics talk about the freakin Anglicans .
(05-23-2014, 12:26 AM)Poche Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-23-2014, 12:09 AM)AntoniusMaximus Wrote: [ -> ]technically, and don't quote me on this, but you don't need to be a deacon to become a priest as they are two separate offices.  In Canon Law, there is such thing as dispensation from a requirement, there can be many justifications for dispensing with a requirement.  Whether it was prudent to give a dispensation or to have a "conditional" ordination, that is debatable.  It doesn't mean the validity of Anglican are true.  Now when the Anglican orders were declared null and void, many bishops in the Anglican Church sought out ordination under the Old Catholic Church, to you know stick it to the Pope.  But I haven't seen too many clerics that have looked favorably on this.
My impression is that they didn't do it to "stick it to the Pope." They did it as a back-handed recognition of his authority as Pope to make the determination as to the validity of their orders.  

you probably are right, excuse my polemics.

The pope is a successor to the Apostles isn't he? He has the power to bind and loose. He can receive someone any way he chooses.
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