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Full Version: More Protestant historical revisionism: Lutherans invented the Middle Ages
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The origin of the concept of a 'Middle Ages' comes from the German expression 'Mittelalter', which was popularized by Lutherans in the 16th century. You see, the problem that Protestants faced from the very beginning of their revolt is how to reconcile their new religion with the fact that the Catholic Church has existed for so many centuries, going right back to the first Apostles, and in the course of this period it has produced so many great saints and theologians. If you cannot prove that the first Christians were protestant what you can do instead is change language so that society comes to associate the period of the Catholic Church's rise as an interregnum . Once you achieve this you can present Protestantism as not a revolution but a restoration.

Sorry for the monologue but I thought this might stimulate discussion.

Bubbles


Very, very interesting. Do you have citations for this info?

It's fascinating how the "Middle Ages" and the word "medieval" are so associated with all things bad -- impoverished, filthy, diseased "serfs" who lived lives of superstition and fear; the Catholic Church as a menacing, bloodthirsty force that reveled in torture and burning people at the stake; any spirited, intelligent woman being deemed a "witch" and "martyred"; the Jewish people oppressed by evil Christians, etc. That really is what most people in the West believe. It's "common knowledge." Consider the forces that went into making that the case (and still do)...

Berman, H. Law and Revolution II: the impact of the Protestant Reformation on the Western Legal Tradition, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., p.22.
(05-29-2014, 12:05 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: [ -> ]Very, very interesting. Do you have citations for this info?

It's fascinating how the "Middle Ages" and the word "medieval" are so associated with all things bad -- impoverished, filthy, diseased "serfs" who lived lives of superstition and fear; the Catholic Church as a menacing, bloodthirsty force that reveled in torture and burning people at the stake; any spirited, intelligent woman being deemed a "witch" and "martyred"; the Jewish people oppressed by evil Christians, etc. That really is what most people in the West believe. It's "common knowledge." Consider the forces that went into making that the case (and still do)...

Doesn't say much for "common knowledge", does it? 

Can't help but wonder how folks will characterize our times in few hundred years, should anyone still be around then.  I'm sure they'll speak/write with glowing praise at how highly "civilized" and "humane" we were  Eye-roll Shocked Grin
That's interesting. I always imagined that “Middle Ages” (which, by the way, by this very name assumes it was an age that was only the way to “us”) was an invention of the 17th century enlightenment, so I wouldn't imagine it was explicitly theologically motivated. But indeed, much of the things we believe about the Crusades, the Inquisition and so on are products of protestant propaganda.

By the way, even to this day this millennial plague is still present among protestants (you know, when they say that the meaning of history is within history and its culmination is “them”). And even worse, I actually know protestants “pastors” who think the Church only existed until the fourth century and then came back in the 16th century; its a mystery to me why anyone who has any sense of history is a protestant (but then again, its a mystery to me why people believe more in new age stuff than in Jesus Christ).
It won't matter in the end; after all, in three years we're going to affirm our "oneness of faith" with the Lutherans during the 500th "celebration" of the Reformation. 
(05-30-2014, 09:19 AM)LeGrandDerangement Wrote: [ -> ]It won't matter in the end; after all, in three years we're going to affirm our "oneness of faith" with the Lutherans during the 500th "celebration" of the Reformation. 

That'd be great-----IF that faith we will be affirming is the  true CATHOLIC faith, not the Lutheran "revision" of it.  Otherwise........Oy vey ist mir!!!!!
I don't think history is going to look favourably on Protestants. The Church will be vindicated because when people look back they will marvel at how silly the common philosophy is: the idea that you can invent your own truth rather than confirm to Truth.
If we affirmed the Truth of the Church at this "celebration" that would be great, but I fear the corrosive effect of the Conciliar Church's addiction to ecumenism/indifferentism.  Additionally, I find the expectation that the Catholic faithful would applaud the Reformation akin to expecting the British taxpayer to celebrate July 4.