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Full Version: A Heart Beat Away From Judgment: Are You Ready?
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Jesus described the road to salvation as hard and narrow, while the road to damnation wide and easy. I think that many in the Church fool themselves into thinking they are secure, simply by being religious. Religiousness does not automatically equate with holiness, as evidenced by the harshness Christ had toward the religious hypocrites described in the Gospels.

Salvation is not about merely following religious rules, but rather the transformation of the soul, beginning by a sincere turning away from sin. According to Scripture, a person who claims to love God but hates his neighbor is a liar, and there is no truth in him. Elsewhere, Jesus warns than not everyone who call out  "Lord, Lord! "will be saved, and warning about the tortures of Purgatory, Jesus warns how His Heavenly Father will treat us if we do not forgive from the heart:

“Then the master called the servant in. ‘You wicked servant,’ he said, ‘I canceled all that debt of yours because you begged me to. Shouldn’t you have had mercy on your fellow servant just as I had on you?’  In anger his master handed him over to the jailers to be tortured, until he should pay back all he owed. “This is how my heavenly Father will treat each of you unless you forgive your brother or sister from your heart.”(Matt. 18:32-35)

The fact that you do not know when your moment of death will be, there is a chance that in a few hours from now you could very well be lying in a morgue somewhere, already having been judged. After all, Jesus always warned to watch and pray, because death often comes like a thief in the night, when we least expect it.

If you knew you would be dead in 3 hours, what would you be doing different right now? I'm sure you wouldn't be wasting g your time on the Internet.

St. Faustina described what some people living right now will be experiencing later tonight, because they put off being ready for that moment of judgment:
yeah, I am SO bad at the whole forgiveness thing.  I hold grudges like crazy. 
I do wonder what the disabled can do to love their neighbors. In many cities it is impossible to go outside and do any corporal works of mercy. Many live secluded lives and their only contact with the outside world is the internet.
(06-17-2014, 12:33 AM)ThomasTheDoubter Wrote: [ -> ]I do wonder what the disabled can do to love their neighbors. In many cities it is impossible to go outside and do any corporal works of mercy. Many live secluded lives and their only contact with the outside world is the internet.
There are both corporal and spiritual works of mercy. One need not work at a soup kitchen to be helping neighbor. One of the greatest works of mercy one can do for another is to pray and offer sacrifices for somebody.  Our Lady of Fatima said that many fall into hell because there is nobody praying and offering penances for the conversion of sinners. A great act of mercy is to pray for the souls who are stuck in the prison of Purgatory. As their time on earth is finished, they do not have their bodies to do good or to make reparation or offer up penances and mortifications. Thus we the Church Militant can help them.

As soldiers in God's Army on earth, the Church Militant has all the tools, and all the weapons to fight a fierce battle for souls. The problem is that the army is in disarray, amy are awol and the ones fighting are few. Thus the particular Judgment for a Catholic will be severe if all the inspirations and graces go unheeded. The road to hell is paved with good intentions. That stranger sitting next to you on the bus? Say a prayer for him. Those people you see suffering on the news, offer a mortification for them. Our conscience is our cross. It's all about carrying our crosses in life to a crucifixion of our vices, a stripping ourselves of earthly attachments and a complete death to sin; all united to Christ for the salvation of souls..

Bishop Sheen speaks of it here
(06-17-2014, 01:17 AM)Gabriel Serafin Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-17-2014, 12:33 AM)ThomasTheDoubter Wrote: [ -> ]I do wonder what the disabled can do to love their neighbors. In many cities it is impossible to go outside and do any corporal works of mercy. Many live secluded lives and their only contact with the outside world is the internet.
There are both corporal and spiritual works of mercy. One need not work at a soup kitchen to be helping neighbor. One of the greatest works of mercy one can do for another is to pray and offer sacrifices for somebody.  Our Lady of Fatima said that many fall into hell because there is nobody praying and offering penances for the conversion of sinners. A great act of mercy is to pray for the souls who are stuck in the prison of Purgatory. As their time on earth is finished, they do not have their bodies to do good or to make reparation or offer up penances and mortifications. Thus we the Church Militant can help them.

As soldiers in God's Army on earth, the Church Militant has all the tools, and all the weapons to fight a fierce battle for souls. The problem is that the army is in disarray, amy are awol and the ones fighting are few. Thus the particular Judgment for a Catholic will be severe if all the inspirations and graces go unheeded. The road to hell is paved with good intentions. That stranger sitting next to you on the bus? Say a prayer for him. Those people you see suffering on the news, offer a mortification for them. Our conscience is our cross. It's all about carrying our crosses in life to a crucifixion of our vices, a stripping ourselves of earthly attachments and a complete death to sin; all united to Christ for the salvation of souls..

Bishop Sheen speaks of it here
    I agree with and like what you said.  Question though. There are times when I want to forgive and try to, but then when dealing with the person again, those feelings of hurt come back. Have I truly forgiven them? Even though deep within me, I want to and desire to forgive them?
Tantum Ergo Sacramentum Wrote:There are times when I want to forgive and try to, but then when dealing with the person again, those feelings of hurt come back.

You said, when dealing with the person again. Are you in a situation where you must deal with him again? Do you work with him? Is this a member of your family? I ask because some people think that in order to forgive someone, we have to "become friends" again. But sometimes it's better to leave certain relationships behind for the good of our souls and the safety of our physical and mental health. That doesn't mean we haven't forgiven them.

Quote:Have I truly forgiven them? Even though deep within me, I want to and desire to forgive them?

Forgiveness is an act of the will. You wouldn't be human if "feelings of hurt" didn't resurface from time to time. But with an act of the will we can pray for them and their salvation, and wish them the best in the temporal world.  That way bitterness doesn't set in.  Those feelings are hard to overcome too, but the "desire to forgive" is also praise-worthy. God knows what's in your heart.
(06-17-2014, 08:25 AM)Tantum Ergo Sacramentum Wrote: [ -> ]There are times when I want to forgive and try to, but then when dealing with the person again, those feelings of hurt come back. Have I truly forgiven them? Even though deep within me, I want to and desire to forgive them?

Sin is in the will, not the feelings.  This is why St. Paul writes, "Be angry, but sin not."
(06-17-2014, 08:41 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]
Tantum Ergo Sacramentum Wrote:There are times when I want to forgive and try to, but then when dealing with the person again, those feelings of hurt come back.

You said, when dealing with the person again. Are you in a situation where you must deal with him again? Do you work with him? Is this a member of your family? I ask because some people think that in order to forgive someone, we have to "become friends" again. But sometimes it's better to leave certain relationships behind for the good of our souls and the safety of our physical and mental health. That doesn't mean we haven't forgiven them.

Quote:Have I truly forgiven them? Even though deep within me, I want to and desire to forgive them?

Forgiveness is an act of the will. You wouldn't be human if "feelings of hurt" didn't resurface from time to time. But with an act of the will we can pray for them and their salvation, and wish them the best in the temporal world.  That way bitterness doesn't set in.  Those feelings are hard to overcome too, but the "desire to forgive" is also praise-worthy. God knows what's in your heart.
I want to thank you both SCT and CB for your posts.
(06-17-2014, 12:33 AM)ThomasTheDoubter Wrote: [ -> ]I do wonder what the disabled can do to love their neighbors. In many cities it is impossible to go outside and do any corporal works of mercy. Many live secluded lives and their only contact with the outside world is the internet.

The internet provides lots of opportunities. Someone could do like I used to do and open a Catholic room on a chat service like PalTalk and do some preaching. One could make a website for the purpose of evangelizing or helping people in other ways. If it's allowed, a person could volunteer to work a suicide hotline (if they do a phone forwarding kind of thing). A person could tutor people over the internet. A person could coordinate the efforts of people who aren't physically disabled. Depending on the kind of disability, a person could bake cookies for nursing homes or whatever, and arrange for someone to get them where they need to be. Same with funeral ministries through their local parish (the baking of lasagnes and cakes for the bereaved). There's letter-writing -- corresponding with soldiers or prisoners or nursing home residents. Or sending cards to kids in hospitals. Or making toys for kids in hospitals or in shelters. There's always Rosary-making, or just making things for fun to give to others (jewelry or what have you). A disabled person could allow a homeless person or abused spouse to use their guest room for a while. There's joining various discussion forums and keeping an eye out for folks who seem troubled, and then PMing them and just "being there" for them emotionally, developing email or phone relationships to help them get through bad times. There's working the phone for good causes, like, say, the St. Vincent de Paul Society or whatever (or the rare good political candidate). A person could plant-watch or cat-watch for folks going away for a while (they bring their plants or cats over and leave them while they're gone so they get their needs met). They could read books for the blind. If they have artistic skills, they could make art for sale to raise funds for charities. They could "adopt a kid" through a group like the Christian Children's Fund. They could go through obituaries and just send nice cards to people in mourning, even strangers (or, better yet, people at their parish). They could babysit or provide foster care for newborns (all they'd need to be able to do is get food for them, bathe them, change diapers, and know how to coo and touch and rock them). Or they could offer foster care for tiny little animals that need to be hand fed and don't require being chased after. They could offer story time once in a while for the kids in the neighborhood, like some libraries do, with a parent tagging along so it doesn't come off as creepy. They could do some scrapbooking and make memory books for people. A bazillion things!

(06-17-2014, 08:51 AM)Tantum Ergo Sacramentum Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-17-2014, 08:41 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: [ -> ]
Tantum Ergo Sacramentum Wrote:There are times when I want to forgive and try to, but then when dealing with the person again, those feelings of hurt come back.

You said, when dealing with the person again. Are you in a situation where you must deal with him again? Do you work with him? Is this a member of your family? I ask because some people think that in order to forgive someone, we have to "become friends" again. But sometimes it's better to leave certain relationships behind for the good of our souls and the safety of our physical and mental health. That doesn't mean we haven't forgiven them.

Quote:Have I truly forgiven them? Even though deep within me, I want to and desire to forgive them?

Forgiveness is an act of the will. You wouldn't be human if "feelings of hurt" didn't resurface from time to time. But with an act of the will we can pray for them and their salvation, and wish them the best in the temporal world.  That way bitterness doesn't set in.  Those feelings are hard to overcome too, but the "desire to forgive" is also praise-worthy. God knows what's in your heart.
I want to thank you both SCT and CB for your posts.

I like their posts, too. They're right on. And it brings to mind something else where people can let their emotions -- or lack thereof -- mess them up:  The Sacrament of Penance.  Sometimes folks do something and know it's wrong, and, so, are intellectually sorry for having done it and resolve to never do it again. BUT, they don't feel all guilt-ridden. They're not burning with shame, not wallowing in it, not kicking themselves, not letting it affect how they feel about themselves. They might not even be emotionally bothered enough to think about it a whole lot. But they may well feel guilty for not feeling "guilty enough."

-- and conversely, there are people who feel guilty over every little thing, sin or not. They're ate up with the scruples. "I started thinking about that baseball game when praying the Rosary! What kind of person AM I?" or "I think that guy is so gorgeous. Am I lusting? Will I burn in Hell?!"

Both types can chillax. Like SCG and Clare said, it's the will that matters. Our emotions can be affected by a thousand things -- from whether we've had breakfast yet to whether we're sick, whether our dog just died, whether we're just in a pissy mood -- whatever. Ideally, the emotions and the situations we find ourselves in match up so they at least "make sense," but if they don't, then so be it. People should never, ever beat themselves up for their mere feelings or desires. It's what we DO with them that counts :)

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