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Or more properly, the Sarum Use [of the Roman Rite]

I love Pugin. I absolutely love Pugin. I have a book called 'Gothic for Ever': A.W.N. Pugin, Lord Shrewsbury and the Rebuilding of Catholic England. In it is a chapter on St Giles Cheadle*, Staffordshire, his "consolation in all affliction".  Here he created the perfect revival of a Medieval English [Catholic, obviously] Parish Church. Always scholarly, he even designed into the sanctuary an Easter Sepulchre**, an architectural feature peculiar to the Sarum rite.

I know for a fact the Sarum use was not around in Pugin's day, having become extinct during the Reformation. Or am I wrong?

My questions are: Is the Sarum rite celebrated anywhere? (in the form of a valid Catholic Mass that is; I am not concerned with 'Western Rite' Orthodox rites or Anglo-Catholic simulations) Are they authentic reconstructions? (or are they haphazard hybrids) Is it permitted to be celebrated? Is it possible to reconstruct a viable liturgical books (including chant) for the Sarum Use for mainstream parochial use?

* http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Giles'_...h,_Cheadle
** http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Sepulchre
If we're going for superlatives, I should join in to keep a balance: I despise Pugin. I utterly despise Pugin! (Sorry, I'm a Romanesque and Baroque zealot  LOL Gothic is evil. )

The Sarum Rite was unfortunately developed mostly during the 15th century. It never met Trent's requirement of being at least 300+ years old at the time the Tridentine Mass was released; thus, it was suppressed. Ironically, by the time it was suppressed (I'm not so sure if it was suppressed, but )no one was using it anymore by 1570 anyway because England had become definitively Protestant-ruled only 5-10 years before the declaration.

Modern Anglican-Use (Ordinariate) Masses are more Book of Common Prayer-influenced than Sarum-influenced, granting that the original BCP came out of Sarum. I am a Sarum lover, and I've never heard of it being celebrated anywhere in an authentic Catholic recension and under a Catholic bishop. There's a set of videos on YouTube showing an Anglican attempt at Candlemas in Sarum... but it's just liturgical Live-Action Role Playing, not liturgy.
Although it's 6-7 years old, there's a discussion in the Comments section of this old NLM article that might interest you:

http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/200...ELb6RZRW3M
(10-18-2014, 05:24 PM)Heorot Wrote: [ -> ]If we're going for superlatives, I should join in to keep a balance: I despise Pugin. I utterly despise Pugin! (Sorry, I'm a Romanesque and Baroque zealot  LOL Gothic is evil. )

The Sarum Rite was unfortunately developed mostly during the 15th century. It never met Trent's requirement of being at least 300+ years old at the time the Tridentine Mass was released; thus, it was suppressed. Ironically, by the time it was suppressed (I'm not so sure if it was suppressed, but )no one was using it anymore by 1570 anyway because England had become definitively Protestant-ruled only 5-10 years before the declaration.

Modern Anglican-Use (Ordinariate) Masses are more Book of Common Prayer-influenced than Sarum-influenced, granting that the original BCP came out of Sarum. I am a Sarum lover, and I've never heard of it being celebrated anywhere in an authentic Catholic recension and under a Catholic bishop. There's a set of videos on YouTube showing an Anglican attempt at Candlemas in Sarum... but it's just liturgical Live-Action Role Playing, not liturgy.

Ugh, those filthy Latin peoples and their pagan inspired architecture.  LOL

Fortunately, Trent's decree of antiquity would not be an obstacle since according to the Catholic Encyclopaedia it was established by Saint Osmund in the 11th century. One strange thing to have happened after Trent was the destructive removal of Rood screens! (It seems every time the Catholic Church convenes an ecumenical council, architectural destruction ensues LOL ... but if that means after Vatican III all the free-standing table-altars will be destroyed, then far be it from to stop them  LOL)
Ah, the Sarum Use!  Ye old beauty!

The canonical status is complicated.  The fact is that for centuries it went into a period of disuse.  The last Sarum Missal was officially issued in the 16th century during the reign of Queen Mary of England.  But contrary to Herot, it was old enough to fall under Trent's 200-year rule.  The Sarum Use was used for centuries and just prior to the Reformation it had obtained supremacy in the British Isles (with the localised Uses of Aberdeen, etc., only showing minor variation, and that was principally in the calendar and Divine Office).

The problem is that when the Catholic Church was suppressed after Queen Mary's reign, the faithful priests were exiled or executed, and those exiles went to the continent.  Future students and priests were all educated on the continent.  They were not educated with the Sarum Use, they were given the Roman Use or a Gallican Use which was very similar to the Roman Use (keep in mind that the Roman Use didn't become triumphant in France until Dom Guéranger's Liturgical Movement).  The Sarum Use was never abrogated.  Force of necessity dictated that future priests in the British Isles use the Roman books because that's all that they had available.

It has been celebrated occasionally since then.  The former Archbishop of Glasgow, His Grace Mario Conti, when he was the Lord Bishop of Aberdeen, offered the Sarum Use for students at Aberdeen University a few years ago (2000).  There was also a priest and some faithful in England that were celebrating the Sarum Use, and I think that's still going on under the radar, I couldn't tell you.

I think an argument could be made in its favour in that it was never legally abrogated and simply fell out of use.  I would love to see it be reinstated as the Extraordinary Form option for priests in Britain and Ireland.  Bishop Conti said that "permission of the Holy See was not sought, and I judged that it was not needed, since the Mass is substantially that of the so-called Tridentine Rite, the central eucharistic prayer, or canon, being almost word for word that of the Roman canon still in use throughout the Latin rite."

Furthermore, the PCED said in 2009 in a letter to a priest of the Ambrosian Rite:

"Reverend Father,

    Your letter of January 7, 2009 has had our attention but is still waiting for a reply.  You express a desire to “receive the comfort of having the approval of the possibility that also your Ambrosian students who ask for it can enjoy the benefits guaranteed by the Holy Father” in the Motu proprio “Summorum Pontificum”.

    While it is true that the Motu proprio of the Holy Father does not expressly cite the Ambrosian rite, it doesn’t exclude the other Latin rites; if the will of the Holy Father asserts for the Roman rite, considering that it is superior in dignity, consequently much more for the other Latin rites, including the Ambrosian rite.

    Wishing the blessings of the Lord on your pedagogical work, I greet you fraternally."

It's been done in England occasionally, I would love to see it fully restored in these islands.
(10-18-2014, 05:24 PM)Heorot Wrote: [ -> ]There's a set of videos on YouTube showing an Anglican attempt at Candlemas in Sarum... but it's just liturgical Live-Action Role Playing, not liturgy.
Actually, it was a Catholic Mass said by Fr. Seán Finnegan, currently assigned to Sacred Heart Church in Canterham.

Fr. Finnegan has a summary of the legal status on his old blog: http://valleadurni.blogspot.com/2008/02/...-mass.html  He concludes saying, "I am of the opinion that the Sarum Use is morally available to clergy of the British Isles, though it is now subject to a legal dubium which really needs clearing up."