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Seems to be this weekend is the date. Cdl Dolan just posted this today:
http://www.cny.org/stories/Dying-and-Rising,11715
Quote:Let me be candid: there will soon be a real sense of grief at some of our parishes as we get set to announce publicly what we’ve been preparing for the last five years, namely, the merging of some of our beloved parishes. In a few places, there might even be a feeling that something has died.

Perhaps the feast days this Saturday and Sunday can set a spiritual tone for what will be, undeniably, a tough time for us all, especially for the parishioners of the affected parishes.
As we now come to the decision point of our Making All Things New strategic pastoral planning, which began years ago and intensified the last year-and-a-half, about 14% of our parishes will undergo a “purgatory,” with decisions to merge them with their welcoming neighbors.

Some of our people will be sad, upset, critical, and even angry. Very understandable…loyal Catholic people love their parishes, and consider them their spiritual home. To see them changed or merged, even with next door parishes, will be very difficult.

I wish it could be different. I’d rather be adding parishes, or expanding the ones we have—and, by the way, we will be!—instead of consolidating some.

This “process” has been exhaustive. Each parish had two representatives, and the vast archdiocese was divided into “clusters” where the delegates, with their pastors, guided by professionals, studied their parishes and made recommendations. These were refined, discussed, debated, and finally went to the larger umbrella committee, which accepted almost all of them. The deans, priests’ council, pastoral council, and college of consultors were all involved. It all then came to me, and, along with my brother bishops, we’ve made the decisions. I’m happy to say almost all are consonant with what came from the grassroots.


I've seen some articles that have mentioned this weekend or early next week to be the time when they will be announcing them. One website I read listed three towns in my county with parishes that offer the EF (one of which is the only in my area which offers the Missa Cantata) as potential closures. I'm curious to see how many traditional parishes Dolan closes. Of course there was the Holy Innocents thing that blew up months ago, let's see how this plays out.
(10-30-2014, 05:16 PM)GangGreen Wrote: [ -> ]Seems to be this weekend is the date. Cdl Dolan just posted this today:
http://www.cny.org/stories/Dying-and-Rising,11715
Quote:Let me be candid: there will soon be a real sense of grief at some of our parishes as we get set to announce publicly what we’ve been preparing for the last five years, namely, the merging of some of our beloved parishes. In a few places, there might even be a feeling that something has died.

Perhaps the feast days this Saturday and Sunday can set a spiritual tone for what will be, undeniably, a tough time for us all, especially for the parishioners of the affected parishes.
As we now come to the decision point of our Making All Things New strategic pastoral planning, which began years ago and intensified the last year-and-a-half, about 14% of our parishes will undergo a “purgatory,” with decisions to merge them with their welcoming neighbors.

Some of our people will be sad, upset, critical, and even angry. Very understandable…loyal Catholic people love their parishes, and consider them their spiritual home. To see them changed or merged, even with next door parishes, will be very difficult.

I wish it could be different. I’d rather be adding parishes, or expanding the ones we have—and, by the way, we will be!—instead of consolidating some.

This “process” has been exhaustive. Each parish had two representatives, and the vast archdiocese was divided into “clusters” where the delegates, with their pastors, guided by professionals, studied their parishes and made recommendations. These were refined, discussed, debated, and finally went to the larger umbrella committee, which accepted almost all of them. The deans, priests’ council, pastoral council, and college of consultors were all involved. It all then came to me, and, along with my brother bishops, we’ve made the decisions. I’m happy to say almost all are consonant with what came from the grassroots.


I've seen some articles that have mentioned this weekend or early next week to be the time when they will be announcing them. One website I read listed three towns in my county with parishes that offer the EF (one of which is the only in my area which offers the Missa Cantata) as potential closures. I'm curious to see how many traditional parishes Dolan closes. Of course there was the Holy Innocents thing that blew up months ago, let's see how this plays out.



Maybe the claimed traditionalist revival isn't as strong as some think.  :shrug:
I would beg to differ.
Quote:I wish it could be different. I’d rather be adding parishes, or expanding the ones we have—and, by the way, we will be!—instead of consolidating some.
??? How isn't that a contradiction?

Well, all the Judaish motives (you know, using the poor as excuse to cut down the money directed to the sheep) aside, I think he's right. The Church is smaller, and I think everyone could see this coming. Also, be prepared to lose tax exemption as the culture war get's more ugly.
The real problem, though, is precisely what the lady the Archbishop quoted says: “As long as I have a place for Mass, I’ll be fine.”
Well, yes, but I suspect a byproduct (maybe intentional) of these merges will be the limiting of the traditional Mass.

I realize New York is specially problematic, with all the gay friendly Masses they have. I shudder to think of going to a Church all rainbow-colored, even if the Mass is the EF said by the old priest. That would turn the parish literally in just a place for Mass, and not a spiritual home, as Archbishop says.

(10-30-2014, 05:45 PM)Silouan Wrote: [ -> ]Maybe the claimed traditionalist revival isn't as strong as some think.

I don't think there's a revival, really. But traditional folks are (in the average) not declining so drastically, and in some cases are even rising in numbers.
Its getting real silly to see liberal NO big parishes all vacant, and small traditional chapels completely full, with people standing. I imagine its even worse in NY.


I don't have an extensive knowledge of other parishes in the AD, but I typically go to two different parishes that offer the EF.

One is about 30 minutes away and has been offering the EF for many years. I believe they have an FSSP priest come to offer the Mass and they were one of the few churches that actually had been granted permission from the Bishop (would have been Cdl O'Connor or Cdl Egan at the time) before SP. I'd say that there's probably a couple hundred people who come to this Mass each week. This church has pretty big schola, they do the sung mass twice a month typically. There are large numbers of younger people that go to this Mass, probably ten or so servers (all high school age and younger) for the sung mass, the schola has a number of younger people of both genders (and older people obviously). Let's just say that this is a thriving community. They also have extra Masses in the evening on feast days (e.g., Saturday for All Saints Day and Monday for All Souls Day) , which is nice.

The other one I go to is closer and is about 15 minutes away. They only started offering the EF a year ago. The pastor decided that he wanted to start doing it and has been ever since. There are maybe 20 to 30 people for each Mass (Low Mass only), mainly older people, but I do see a few younger people as well. It does seem like it's slowly growing.

Both places do the Mass at 3 pm, which IMO isn't the best time especially during football season where people would rather go to Mass in the morning and then watch football all day.
(10-30-2014, 07:49 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote: [ -> ]Also, be prepared to lose tax exemption as the culture war get's more ugly.

I have always maintained that the loss of the tax exemption may be a good thing for the traditionalist part of the church. It basically will separate the believers from the non-believers. I doubt the removal of the tax exemption will adversely affect the attendance and tithing at TLM masses, but I bet the NO masses will be highly impacted.
List is out.
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/...close.html

Thank God, only two churches (unless I missed some) that offer the EF were affected, both in the upper counties of the AD.
Tivoli St. Sylvia Church
Kingston St. Peter Church

Looks like Holy Innocents has been spared as well.
(11-02-2014, 12:50 PM)GangGreen Wrote: [ -> ]List is out.
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/...close.html

Thank God, only two churches (unless I missed some) that offer the EF were affected, both in the upper counties of the AD.
Tivoli St. Sylvia Church
Kingston St. Peter Church

Looks like Holy Innocents has been spared as well.

Hopefully, arrangements can me made for the closed EF parishes to ensure the attendees are not adversely affected. It appears that the churches that are absorbing the TLM parishes have the same or similar zip codes, meaning that the new parish will not be that far from the closed parish.  It would be nice if the consolidated church has a TLM.
Wonderful news about Holy Innocents and St. Michael's. Father Rutler has done a wonderful job in building up the awareness of this traditional resource, but the real credit for this reprieve for St. Michael's and, hopefully, salvation of Holy Innocents goes to the lay people who have lobbied forcefully and very publicly on behalf of Tradition and continuing availability of the Mass of the Ages. I must say I'm surprised. After all the decision was up to none other than Cardinal Dolan. Even though both of those parishes are "turning a profit" (as if that should matter given the nature of the parishes and their parishioners), I expected he of the gay parades and liturgy and newsboy cap to jump at the opportunity to end any availability of the "most beautiful thing this side of heaven" to New Yorkers and visitors. If you ever get a chance to attend Holy Innocents, please take advantage of it. It's a beautiful church a short walking distance from Times Square. And please stop to pray for a minute at the "Return Crucifix" just inside the front entrance on the right.
(10-31-2014, 10:46 AM)GangGreen Wrote: [ -> ]I don't have an extensive knowledge of other parishes in the AD, but I typically go to two different parishes that offer the EF.

One is about 30 minutes away and has been offering the EF for many years. I believe they have an FSSP priest come to offer the Mass and they were one of the few churches that actually had been granted permission from the Bishop (would have been Cdl O'Connor or Cdl Egan at the time) before SP. I'd say that there's probably a couple hundred people who come to this Mass each week. This church has pretty big schola, they do the sung mass twice a month typically. There are large numbers of younger people that go to this Mass, probably ten or so servers (all high school age and younger) for the sung mass, the schola has a number of younger people of both genders (and older people obviously). Let's just say that this is a thriving community. They also have extra Masses in the evening on feast days (e.g., Saturday for All Saints Day and Monday for All Souls Day) , which is nice.

The other one I go to is closer and is about 15 minutes away. They only started offering the EF a year ago. The pastor decided that he wanted to start doing it and has been ever since. There are maybe 20 to 30 people for each Mass (Low Mass only), mainly older people, but I do see a few younger people as well. It does seem like it's slowly growing.

Both places do the Mass at 3 pm, which IMO isn't the best time especially during football season where people would rather go to Mass in the morning and then watch football all day.

Hi,

You sound like you are in my neighbor hood.

There is a TLM about 30-45 min away from me with limited parking.  One just started about a year ago with great parking.  There are about 20-30 people who go there and after we have "cookie" time and Father comes and joins us.