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Stating that Scripture “makes it clear that the Gospel is not merely about our personal relationship with God,” Pope Francis discussed baptism, Christian unity, and the kingdom of God in a November 6 meeting with a delegation of the World Evangelical Alliance.

“From the beginning, there have been divisions among Christians and sadly, even today, conflicts and rivalries exist between our communities,” the Pope said. “This weakens our ability to fulfill the Lord’s commandment to preach the Gospel to all peoples … The effectiveness of the Christian message would no doubt be greater were Christians to overcome their divisions, and together celebrate the sacraments, spread the word of God, and bear witness to charity.”

“I trust that the Holy Spirit, who inspires the Church to persevere in seeking new methods of evangelization, will usher in a new era of relations between Catholics and evangelicals, so that the Lord’s will that the Gospel be brought to the ends of the earth may be more fully realized,” he concluded. “With this prayer, I ask you to pray for me and for my ministry.”


http://www.catholicculture.org/news/head...ryid=23150
I remain perplexed when it comes to trying to discern this popes apparent near obsession with evangelical Protestants. They are a Protestant sect that is perhaps the farthest away from traditional Catholics doctrinally, dogmatically and aesthetically. In short there is hardly anything in common with them except for baptism provided most evangelicals are even validly baptized at all.
I think it's the fact that where he's from, they're pretty much the only other group.  Plus they at least care about Jesus and making him known, whereas most other groups in the West do not.  That's not nothing in this day and age.  I'm not sure if this is the case in Argentina, but in the US its pretty much only the Catholics and evangelicals who are trying to defend the natural law (even if the evangelicals don't even think about the concept) in the civil sphere and who oppose the unhealthy secularism that has been becoming more and more popular.  Other groups are moving along with the world more and more, while evangelicals are not and in many cases are moving closer to Catholicism--Christian converts to Catholicism seem to me to be mostly evangelical, not the "traditional" Protestants.  I even read an article recently about Evangelicals who protested to the Pope to not cave to secularism at the recent Synod.
Yes but Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI has addressed Pope Francis' style on going out.

"In the end, Benedict XVI. makes the title of the Apostolic Exhortation by Pope Francis, Gospel gaudium, his own, albeit in a somewhat modified form of content. Whoever has received the "joy" of faith, could not do otherwise, as they pass through life. The Emeritus grasped this "going out", which is so important to the reigning pope,  in its slightly different context, namely that it is without  an actual or apparent renunciation of the truth, which could be "fatal  ".""

http://www.fisheaters.com/forums/index.p...=3466475.0

Even though Catholics and Evangelicals defend natural truth together, we Catholics should still be trying to bring Evangelicals home to the One Holy Catholic Apostolic Church.

Certainly that is the case--the end goal is that true unity.  There is the thought that working together toward common goals can be a source of grace leading to that unity, rather than polemics.  St. Thomas More thought  as much.  He thought the various Protestants and Catholics coming together to defend themselves against the invading Turks could be a means to that unity:

St. Thomas More, Dialogue of Comfort, XII Wrote:And it is a right heavy thing to see such variousness in our belief rise and grow among ourselves, to the great encouragement of the common enemies of us all, whereby they have our faith in derision and catch hope to overwhelm us all. Yet do three things not a little comfort my mind. The first is that, in some communications had of late together, there hath appeared good likelihood of some good agreement to grow together in one accord of our faith. The second is that in the meanwhile, till this may come to pass, contentions, disputations, and uncharitable behaviour are prohibited and forbidden in effect upon all parties--all such parties, I mean, as fell before to fight for it. The third is that in Germany, for all their diverse opinions, yet as they agree together in profession of Christ's name, so agree they now together in preparation of a common power, in defence of Christendom against our common enemy the Turk. And I trust in God that this shall not only help us here to strengthen us in this war, but also that, as God hath caused them to agree together in the defence of his name, so shall he graciously bring them to agree together in the truth of his faith. Therefore will I let God work, and leave off contention. And I shall now say nothing but that with which they who are themselves of the contrary mind shall in reason have no cause to be discontented.
For a guy with one good lung, he talks a lot.
(11-07-2014, 11:25 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote: [ -> ]Other groups are moving along with the world more and more, while evangelicals are not and in many cases are moving closer to Catholicism--Christian converts to Catholicism seem to me to be mostly evangelical, not the "traditional" Protestants.

I would like to know the basis for this assertion, with special emphasis on two things:

1.  Evangelical practice on divorce and remarriage.
2. Evangelical acceptance of contraception.

My experience is that Evangelicals are right in the midst of "the world" when it comes to contraception.  There is nearly universal acceptance of it, with some exceptions.

Contraception is a mortal sin.  Evangelicals who resort to it are, objectively speaking, in the state of mortal sin.  That would appear to be the overwhelming majority of them.

How can we, as Catholics, and the pope, ignore the fact that the majority of these people, by their own admission, are defying God's law in a mortally sinful way by their near universal recourse to contraception?
Not sure how it is everywhere, but here in the South a lot of these evangelical churches are made up of ex-Catholics.  They even brag about it (one of the larger in the area is called Hope and their pastor likes to say 'From Pope to Hope'
(11-07-2014, 11:55 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote: [ -> ]Certainly that is the case--the end goal is that true unity.  There is the thought that working together toward common goals can be a source of grace leading to that unity, rather than polemics.  St. Thomas More thought  as much.  He thought the various Protestants and Catholics coming together to defend themselves against the invading Turks could be a means to that unity:

St. Thomas More, Dialogue of Comfort, XII Wrote:And it is a right heavy thing to see such variousness in our belief rise and grow among ourselves, to the great encouragement of the common enemies of us all, whereby they have our faith in derision and catch hope to overwhelm us all. Yet do three things not a little comfort my mind. The first is that, in some communications had of late together, there hath appeared good likelihood of some good agreement to grow together in one accord of our faith. The second is that in the meanwhile, till this may come to pass, contentions, disputations, and uncharitable behaviour are prohibited and forbidden in effect upon all parties--all such parties, I mean, as fell before to fight for it. The third is that in Germany, for all their diverse opinions, yet as they agree together in profession of Christ's name, so agree they now together in preparation of a common power, in defence of Christendom against our common enemy the Turk. And I trust in God that this shall not only help us here to strengthen us in this war, but also that, as God hath caused them to agree together in the defence of his name, so shall he graciously bring them to agree together in the truth of his faith. Therefore will I let God work, and leave off contention. And I shall now say nothing but that with which they who are themselves of the contrary mind shall in reason have no cause to be discontented.

However Pope Francis, and his posse, have made statements that conversion to Catholicism is not necessary. St Thomas More would not be in agreement with that.

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/standingonm...icals.html
But precisely because the Mainline Protestants are decaying we can evangelize them more efficiently. Imagine how many disappointed Anglicans would be willing to convert if we were to give them a hand, talk a bit with them, ease their fears, etc.
But only the Easterners are getting this slice of Protestants (they are getting even Presbyterians, which are not the most friendly folks out there). Why are we aiming at Evangelicals? If they convert they will all be part of the Charismatic crowd and it will be a nightmare for traditional Catholics. Besides, Evangelicals are way too arrogant for the sort of “dialogue” Francis is having with them. What they need is some Socratic dialogue to reduce them to aporia—and this is not me being mean, but really, its a common theme in classical thought that first we need to tear down our pride, this is the condition of possibility of conversion (that's why S. Augustine only understood that passage of Romans after being led to a state of moral and intellectual aporia).
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