FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Pope OKs Eastern Catholics ordaining married priests in the West
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3
Unconfirmed: The Pope OKs Eastern Catholics ordaining married priests in the West. And if that's true, I think it's great. Let's confound the Western world with the witness of fervent, married conservative priests!
Right--if true, I can't think, offhandedly (or even on my hands), of any bad coming from this. However, I can imagine a great deal of good coming from this.
(11-17-2014, 04:21 AM)youngfogey Wrote: [ -> ]Unconfirmed: The Pope OKs Eastern Catholics ordaining married priests in the West. And if that's true, I think it's great. Let's confound the Western world with the witness of fervent, married conservative priests!

At first I wasn't sure what you meant. "How can a married priest be ordained a priest?" Sticking tongue out at you Now I see the point in the article. I am glad of this development, myself. It is the ancient tradition. Hopefully no one stretches ancient canonical bounds by allowing already-ordained Eastern Rite priests to get married. Abuse is easy. Virtue is difficult!
Yes, let's confound the Western world by undermining once again celibacy, by confirming how weird those celibate priests are and celebrating sex as the ultimate good.

I'm not necessarily against this, but the way this is written here its just non-sense.

Remember that even in Orthodoxy the celibates are the folks who get to be bishops and whatnot.
Also, that this is the ancient norm is debatable, at least.
I've never been against a married priesthood per se, but I've often wondered how a man could possibly give himself completely to his priestly life (much less be an icon of Christ) by having a wife and kids in addition to a parish. There have been exceptional cases of married priests, men like the Wonderworking St. John of Kronstadt but in his case he and his wife never had conjugal relations.

The reason so many priests in the West have troubles with celibacy is probably because they have no spiritual life. Serious spiritual life in priests (daily fidelity to the Divine Office, the Mass, Eucharistic Adoration, Rosary, etc) collapsed after the Council, not to mention the introduction of laity into the sanctuary (including women and girls) have undermined the unique and fatherly role of the priesthood.

A priest in the Latin Rite today who is in a Novus a Ordo parish is sort of an emasculated figurehead,a "presider" who helps orchestrate an assembly of laymen celebrating themselves. There's not much left for a priest in the Novus Ordo.
(11-17-2014, 10:18 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote: [ -> ]Yes, let's confound the Western world by undermining once again celibacy, by confirming how weird those celibate priests are and celebrating sex as the ultimate good.

I'm not necessarily against this, but the way this is written here its just non-sense.

Remember that even in Orthodoxy the celibates are the folks who get to be bishops and whatnot.
Also, that this is the ancient norm is debatable, at least.

My thoughts exactly.  Also, what a slap in the face to those faithful priests who accepted the cross of celibacy out of love for the Church!

In the east, it is a longstanding tradition to have married priests.  The west is missionary territory for the East.  They came here to serve the spiritual needs of Eastern Catholics who had immigrated to the west.  It makes sense that they would bring their tradition of married priests with them.

if you want to be a priest but are unwilling to give up sex in order to do it, go ahead and join an Eastern Rite, get married, and become a priest, and see how well you, your family, and your parishioners do with a spiritual father who embraced a Christian tradition entirely because you wanted the "best of both worlds."

Celibacy is a beautiful and necessary vocation, and its beauty and necessity is confirmed even more by the fact that the world hates it.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
world without end. Amen.
Quote:At first I wasn't sure what you meant. "How can a married priest be ordained a priest?" Sticking tongue out at you Now I see the point in the article.

Ha ha; I know. It's awkward but I had to word it that way because both the Roman and Eastern rites have married deacons, all of whom follow the Orthodox discipline on celibacy as do the married ex-Anglican priests.

Quote:Hopefully no one stretches ancient canonical bounds by allowing already-ordained Eastern Rite priests to get married. Abuse is easy. Virtue is difficult!

We and the Orthodox ordain the married, we don't marry the ordained, and clergy widowers can't remarry.

Quote:Remember that even in Orthodoxy the celibates are the folks who get to be bishops and whatnot.

As I noted in my linked blog post. Having hung around Eastern churches for 20 years, being nominally Orthodox for 16, I know that well. The Greek Catholic option for conservative Roman-born Catholics is honorable and a calling for some people.

Quote:I've never been against a married priesthood per se, but I've often wondered how a man could possibly give himself completely to his priestly life (much less be an icon of Christ) by having a wife and kids in addition to a parish.


Some wags who don't agree with the church's teachings as well as its discipline have quipped that the church will sooner ordain women than the married for that reason. Seriously, sure, it's a factor that makes married priests self-limiting in our society, not that it should be that way. A truly humane economy with affordable family formation, the Catholic social way, plus a society (town, neighborhood, extended family) that makes such vocations possible, like in the Eastern churches' homelands (heck, have rich parishes pay priests rather than the diocese paying them, like medieval England and the Episcopal Church). In America, many Orthodox priests have to be worker priests (holding secular weekday jobs and with the wife working too). That said, "the celibate priest is better because his attention is undivided" is unfair to married priests, part of the bad mindset that produced Cum Data Fuerit, causing a schism in America.

Quote:There have been exceptional cases of married priests, men like the Wonderworking St. John of Kronstadt but in his case he and his wife never had conjugal relations.

Not heroic of him; saints had faults in this life. He tricked a pious girl into marrying him, because he wanted to be a parish priest (and had a talent for that) but didn't REALLY want to be married; some say he was gay. In the Russian Orthodox Church at the time, and today, usually parish priests have to be married first; the unmarried become priest-monks, who don't normally become pastors (the more ambitious being on the bishop track). He sprung his sex ban on her after they were wed. He wasn't all that liturgically conservative either, reducing the iconostasis to a low screen (conservative by Novus Ordo standards but not Orthodox ones), like the liberal ex-Catholics at New Skete. The Russian Orthodox Church Abroad (conservative exile denomination) loved him and canonized him not only for his gifts as a pastor but because he was reactionary tsarist politically.

Quote:The reason so many priests in the West have troubles with celibacy is probably because they have no spiritual life. Serious spiritual life in priests (daily fidelity to the Divine Office, the Mass, Eucharistic Adoration, Rosary, etc) collapsed after the Council, not to mention the introduction of laity into the sanctuary (including women and girls) have undermined the unique and fatherly role of the priesthood.

A priest in the Latin Rite today who is in a Novus Ordo parish is sort of an emasculated figurehead, a "presider" who helps orchestrate an assembly of laymen celebrating themselves. There's not much left for a priest in the Novus Ordo.

All true, so a priest's life often becomes a lonely gay ghetto; the wrong kind of guys go in for the wrong reasons (hiding) and all hell breaks loose (they start hitting on teenage boys), as we saw in the news about 10 years ago. Healthy men, though devout, see the gay and feminized institutional church culture and say "no way." SLOWLY changing back as the church becomes conservative again; next to no vocations anymore but the ones we get are sound.

Quote:If you want to be a priest but are unwilling to give up sex in order to do it, go ahead and join an Eastern Rite, get married, and become a priest, and see how well you, your family, and your parishioners do with a spiritual father who embraced a Christian tradition entirely because you wanted the "best of both worlds."

I covered that in the post. Easy, hypocritical rite-switching won't happen, for several reasons.
(11-17-2014, 11:05 AM)Credidi Propter Wrote: [ -> ]if you want to be a priest but are unwilling to give up sex in order to do it, go ahead and join an Eastern Rite, get married, and become a priest, and see how well you, your family, and your parishioners do with a spiritual father who embraced a Christian tradition entirely because you wanted the "best of both worlds."

I would never advocate someone switching to an Eastern Rite so they can get the "best of both worlds." However, you also forget about the men who have an awakening after they are already married. This type of man can never be a priest unless their wife dies.
(11-17-2014, 12:51 PM)GangGreen Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-17-2014, 11:05 AM)Credidi Propter Wrote: [ -> ]if you want to be a priest but are unwilling to give up sex in order to do it, go ahead and join an Eastern Rite, get married, and become a priest, and see how well you, your family, and your parishioners do with a spiritual father who embraced a Christian tradition entirely because you wanted the "best of both worlds."

I would never advocate someone switching to an Eastern Rite so they can get the "best of both worlds." However, you also forget about the men who have an awakening after they are already married. This type of man can never be a priest unless their wife dies.

I would not advocate it either.  I wasn't being literal.  I'm not sure the Eastern-Rite bishops would advocate it either.

A person may have a spiritual awakening and feel that they have a vocation to the priesthood, but that vocation must be confirmed by the Church.  Someone who is not emotionally stable may feel called to be a priest, but the seminary may find that they are psychologically unstable and unfit for ministry.  While there are extraordinary cases of people being ordained who would not normally have been allowed to be (perhaps they lack the intellectual capacity needed, but are exceptionally holy), but those cases are just that- extraordinary.
Pages: 1 2 3