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I didn't write this, but I believe it contains much righteousness and truth, so I'm posting it here.

Dear Jews,

It’s that special time of year again, you know, that time of year when everyone falls all over themselves to ensure every reference to what exactly makes this time of year so special is made exclusively in terms of snow, presents, candy canes, sleighs, and, if we’re feeling a bit daring, Santa Claus. I took my family driving through the park to see the “holiday” light display, and we were delighted to see seasonal lights in the shape of snowflakes, golfing Santa, sleighs on roofs, and boxes with ribbons on them. Then we took a walk downtown, where only one store had failed to get the memo that “festive decorations” should not include, you know…that word.

So I’ve got a request for a seasonal gift from you folks:

Could you please stop?

We all know the reason the cashier can’t say “Merry Christmas,” the store can’t play “O Come All Ye Faithful” over its PA system, and we can’t have a nativity amongst all those lights. It’s because Americans are the sort of people where if a single Jew throws a noisy tantrum, we shut it down to make him happy. And let’s not kid ourselves; every single Christmas display, festival, or music program that has been ruined in the last 50 years all goes back to some petulant Jew acting like a toddler and either filing a lawsuit or just plain throwing a fit.

Read more: http://therightstuff.biz/2014/12/20/seas...icas-jews/
That was a very snarky editorial. It could have been said in a more tactful manner, and it has been said in the past. A rabbi, Joshua Eli Plaut, wrote a book a couple years ago about how American Jews, using satire, Chanukkah, and secularization, have led the way in transforming Christmas in the United States into a broader, less religiously-oriented observance.

http://www.amazon.com/Kosher-Christmas-T...0813553806

The book is summarized in this review by Ethan Schwartz of Jewish Ideas Daily.
http://www.jewishideasdaily.com/5633/fea...christmas/
Quote:Jews have been the vanguard of an effort to “transform Christmastime into a holiday season belonging to all Americans,” without religious exclusivity.  The most important Jewish mechanisms of secularization are comedy and parody, for laughter undermines religious awe.  Take, for example, Hanukkah Harry from “Saturday Night Live”, who heroically steps in for a bedridden Santa by delivering presents from a cart pulled by donkeys named Moishe, Hershel, and Shlomo.  Remarkably, Hanukkah Harry has emerged as a real Santa-alternative for many American Jews.  Plaut sees such things not as attempts at assimilation but as an intentional subversion of Christmas traditions.  “Through these parodies,” he writes, “Jews could envision not having to be captivated by the allure of ubiquitous Christmas symbols.”  And it isn’t just Jews: for Americans in general, Jewish parody helps ensure that Christmas “not be taken too seriously” and that the celebrations of other traditions “be accorded equal respect and opportunity.”
(12-21-2014, 04:48 AM)Cyriacus Wrote: [ -> ]That was a very snarky editorial. It could have been said in a more tactful manner, and it has been said in the past. A rabbi, Joshua Eli Plaut, wrote a book a couple years ago about how American Jews, using satire, Chanukkah, and secularization, have led the way in transforming Christmas in the United States into a broader, less religiously-oriented observance.

http://www.amazon.com/Kosher-Christmas-T...0813553806

The book is summarized in this review by Ethan Schwartz of Jewish Ideas Daily.
http://www.jewishideasdaily.com/5633/fea...christmas/
Quote:Jews have been the vanguard of an effort to “transform Christmastime into a holiday season belonging to all Americans,” without religious exclusivity.  The most important Jewish mechanisms of secularization are comedy and parody, for laughter undermines religious awe.  Take, for example, Hanukkah Harry from “Saturday Night Live”, who heroically steps in for a bedridden Santa by delivering presents from a cart pulled by donkeys named Moishe, Hershel, and Shlomo.  Remarkably, Hanukkah Harry has emerged as a real Santa-alternative for many American Jews.  Plaut sees such things not as attempts at assimilation but as an intentional subversion of Christmas traditions.  “Through these parodies,” he writes, “Jews could envision not having to be captivated by the allure of ubiquitous Christmas symbols.”  And it isn’t just Jews: for Americans in general, Jewish parody helps ensure that Christmas “not be taken too seriously” and that the celebrations of other traditions “be accorded equal respect and opportunity.”

I suspect this is one of those cases, like many others, where the Jews are allowed to say it but the goyim aren't, lest they be dreadful antisemites.
meh..  the jewisg community i come from we dont get bent out of shape over christmas or insist that chanukah have parity with Christmas..

chanukah 8snt even a big deal compared to other holidays.. very minor
(12-21-2014, 05:13 AM)Chestertonian Wrote: [ -> ]meh..  the jewisg community i come from we dont get bent out of shape over christmas or insist that chanukah have parity with Christmas..

chanukah 8snt even a big deal compared to other holidays.. very minor

Ditto that!

If you're not Jewish yourself, or deal intimately with Jews, you encounter Chanukkah more often in popular culture. This is due to its presence in movies, on Saturday Night Live sketches, and public menorah lightings and displays. The fact that it is actually a very minor holiday in religious terms raises more questions about its prominence in American public life, as opposed to religiously significant holidays that remain more obscure in the broader culture: Passover, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur.

I spoke recently with a fellow goy about Chanukkah, and he told me he was under the impression it was the biggest Jewish holiday. It's easy to see how the confusion can emerge, since it seems some Jews are public with their faith only in response to the public observances of Christians.
(12-23-2014, 08:34 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: [ -> ]If you're not Jewish yourself, or deal intimately with Jews, you encounter Chanukkah more often in popular culture. This is due to its presence in movies, on Saturday Night Live sketches, and public menorah lightings and displays. The fact that it is actually a very minor holiday in religious terms raises more questions about its prominence in American public life, as opposed to religiously significant holidays that remain more obscure in the broader culture: Passover, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur.

I spoke recently with a fellow goy about Chanukkah, and he told me he was under the impression it was the biggest Jewish holiday. It's easy to see how the confusion can emerge, since it seems some Jews are public with their faith only in response to the public observances of Christians.

That's very interesting. I didn't know that.
Here in Brazil when the hysterical neo-atheists wanted crucifixes out of court rooms it was a jewish lawyer who defended keeping the crucifixes, and even arguing that it should be kept because its the tradition of the Country.

I wonder why such a big difference from American jews. I imagine its because in the USA it looks easy to sue people, but I don't know.

Also, maybe that's why I perceive myself to be the person most friendly to jews here on the forum. I had some jewish friends and my neighbors are jewish. Never had problems with them (and, politically, the jewish community here is closer to my own more conservative inclinations, which I guess is another difference from the USA).
There are strong cultural differences among Jews, and it varies both in terms of degree of piety and the specific community in question. The book I mentioned earlier in the thread talks about differing responses to Christmas from different immigrant groups. The German Jews, who immigrated in the mid-19th Century, were more assimilationist and were generally not opposed to taking part in Christmas festivities, which are to some degree a German import in American culture anyway. I know one woman, a Reform Jew descended from old German Jewish immigrants, whose family decorates with a Christmas tree. She calls herself a "WASPy Jew" and jokes that her family has been in America since arriving on "the Jewish Mayflower."

Generally, the immigrants from the Russian Pale of Settlement and their descendants, according to Rabbi Plaut, have taken a less assimilationist and more reactive or subversive stance when it comes to Christmas and hyping Chanukkah as the Jewish Christmas. This might be due to the nature of life in the Eastern European shtetl and ghetto, where Jews were sometimes violently attacked during Christian holidays and forced to remain unseen in public on those days.

I do not know the situation in Brazil, but I would guess your Jews are Sefardim, with family roots mainly going back to Spain and Portugal. This would account for some cultural differences.
Of course not all Jews are raving liberals who want to demean Christmas. Often the atheistic Jews are more hostile to Christianity than the religious Jews are and yes they use humor to take Christ out of Christmas. Others do so unintentionally and without any malice, like Irving Berlin who wrote White Christmas.

As an aside, but I think it’s important to point out, in order to put a human face on this “average Jew” while wondering if there is such a creature: I have a longtime friend, a Dutch Jew who came to America as a child. She told me that in Holland St. Nicholas filled their shoes on December 6th. He came to all Dutch children, be they Jew or Gentile. They also celebrated Chanukah but it was not a major thing. But in the age of television, when the American Christmas greatly overshadowed Chanukah, Jewish Americans tried to make a bigger deal of their December holiday for the sake of their children who felt left out.  Also, she also told me that Dutch Jews place flowers on the graves of their loved ones, while traditionally most Jews do not.  Of course Holland is famous for its tulips.

She also has absolutely no problem wishing me a Merry Christmas. Personally I don’t see anything wrong with saying “Happy Holidays” outside of December 25, as “the holidays” often means the whole package: Thanksgiving, Chanukah, Christmas, New Year. 
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