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The latest round ot stupid crap. 

Quote:Following a visit in March to Tacloban, the Philippine city devastated in 2012 by typhoon Haiyan, the pope will publish a rare encyclical on climate change and human ecology. Urging all Catholics to take action on moral and scientific grounds, the document will be sent to the world’s 5,000 Catholic bishops and 400,000 priests, who will distribute it to parishioners.

What a great pope we have.  Every day, I go outside to check the weather, and a single tear runs down my cheek.  I am so glad that Pope Francis agrees with Al Gore on this.  America and its industry is so evil. 

I blame capitalism and republicans. 


We were put on this planet to worship Gaia and take care of her.  Someone call Captain Planet. 


http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/de...-rightwing

Quote:Pope Francis’s edict on climate change will anger deniers and US churches

Saturday 27 December 2014 16.06 EST 

He has been called the “superman pope”, and it would be hard to deny that Pope Francis has had a good December. Cited by President Barack Obama as a key player in the thawing relations between the US and Cuba, the Argentinian pontiff followed that by lecturing his cardinals on the need to clean up Vatican politics. But can Francis achieve a feat that has so far eluded secular powers and inspire decisive action on climate change?

It looks as if he will give it a go. In 2015, the pope will issue a lengthy message on the subject to the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics, give an address to the UN general assembly and call a summit of the world’s main religions.

The reason for such frenetic activity, says Bishop Marcelo Sorondo, chancellor of the Vatican’s Pontifical Academy of Sciences, is the pope’s wish to directly influence next year’s crucial UN climate meeting in Paris, when countries will try to conclude 20 years of fraught negotiations with a universal commitment to reduce emissions.

“Our academics supported the pope’s initiative to influence next year’s crucial decisions,” Sorondo told Cafod, the Catholic development agency, at a meeting in London. “The idea is to convene a meeting with leaders of the main religions to make all people aware of the state of our climate and the tragedy of social exclusion.”

Following a visit in March to Tacloban, the Philippine city devastated in 2012 by typhoon Haiyan, the pope will publish a rare encyclical on climate change and human ecology. Urging all Catholics to take action on moral and scientific grounds, the document will be sent to the world’s 5,000 Catholic bishops and 400,000 priests, who will distribute it to parishioners.

According to Vatican insiders, Francis will meet other faith leaders and lobby politicians at the general assembly in New York in September, when countries will sign up to new anti-poverty and environmental goals.

In recent months, the pope has argued for a radical new financial and economic system to avoid human inequality and ecological devastation. In October he told a meeting of Latin American and Asian landless peasants and other social movements: “An economic system centred on the god of money needs to plunder nature to sustain the frenetic rhythm of consumption that is inherent to it.

“The system continues unchanged, since what dominates are the dynamics of an economy and a finance that are lacking in ethics. It is no longer man who commands, but money. Cash commands.

“The monopolising of lands, deforestation, the appropriation of water, inadequate agro-toxics are some of the evils that tear man from the land of his birth. Climate change, the loss of biodiversity and deforestation are already showing their devastating effects in the great cataclysms we witness,” he said.

In Lima last month, bishops from every continent expressed their frustration with the stalled climate talks and, for the first time, urged rich countries to act.

Sorondo, a fellow Argentinian who is known to be close to Pope Francis, said: “Just as humanity confronted revolutionary change in the 19th century at the time of industrialisation, today we have changed the natural environment so much. If current trends continue, the century will witness unprecedented climate change and destruction of the ecosystem with tragic consequences.”

According to Neil Thorns, head of advocacy at Cafod, said: “The anticipation around Pope Francis’s forthcoming encyclical is unprecedented. We have seen thousands of our supporters commit to making sure their MPs know climate change is affecting the poorest communities.”

However, Francis’s environmental radicalism is likely to attract resistance from Vatican conservatives and in rightwing church circles, particularly in the US – where Catholic climate sceptics also include John Boehner, Republican leader of the House of Representatives and Rick Santorum, the former Republican presidential candidate.

Cardinal George Pell, a former archbishop of Sydney who has been placed in charge of the Vatican’s budget, is a climate change sceptic who has been criticised for claiming that global warming has ceased and that if carbon dioxide in the atmosphere were doubled, then “plants would love it”.

Dan Misleh, director of the Catholic climate covenant, said: “There will always be 5-10% of people who will take offence. They are very vocal and have political clout. This encyclical will threaten some people and bring joy to others. The arguments are around economics and science rather than morality.

“A papal encyclical is rare. It is among the highest levels of a pope’s authority. It will be 50 to 60 pages long; it’s a big deal. But there is a contingent of Catholics here who say he should not be getting involved in political issues, that he is outside his expertise.”

Francis will also be opposed by the powerful US evangelical movement, said Calvin Beisner, spokesman for the conservative Cornwall Alliance for the Stewardship of Creation, which has declared the US environmental movement to be “un-biblical” and a false religion.

“The pope should back off,” he said. “The Catholic church is correct on the ethical principles but has been misled on the science. It follows that the policies the Vatican is promoting are incorrect. Our position reflects the views of millions of evangelical Christians in the US.”
From homebase.  I managed to encounter some cultists of the Church of Gaia worship tonight. 

Quote:Pope Francis Goes Environmental

Unsurprisingly, our Jesuit Pope wants to tackle environmentalism.

It's not so much that Pope Francis is preaching about the environment, as it is that he's wrong. And it's not so much that Pope Francis is wrong, as it is that he's siding with Gaia-worshiping communists. And it's not so much that Pope Francis is siding with Gaia-worshiping communists as it is that there is so much more wrong and in need of his attention.

For example, Pope Francis really ought to backtrack a little, and make a correction about that Synod on family life he set up. Rather than pouring out attention to sexual deviants and "aberrant fathers and men who eschew fatherhood altogether," he could instead lend his support to earnest family men "who toil in an unfeeling culture as they love their wives and children."

Or, he could just call on a crusade of privately funded men to go to the Middle East to fight ISIS.

Or, he could consecrate Russia to Mary's Immaculate Heart.

Or, he could push for the statue of Our Lady of America to have a procession into America's National Shrine.

Myself, I thought he would be more concerned with the Iraqi Christian children who are getting dissected for their organs while they are still alive.

But hey. Divorced couples, Cuba, environmentalism...a man has to have his priorities. I guess the Iraqi Genocide can wait.

Are people supposed to be good stewards of the environment? Yes.  But a few questions must be asked when it comes to "climate change."

Do we know what is causing the weather to act the way it does? No.

There is no evidence for man-made global climate change. Scientists will argue "a consensus has been made," but a consensus is not science.

Another question that arises: Who is this pope directing his words to? The Philippines? Now, that's a dirty country. They need to learn to collectively stop littering, find a constructive place to put their trash, and they need some sort of emissions regulations for their vehicles. The smog in Cebu City is terrible. Or perhaps Pope Francis will be talking about Beijing, China? Of course, these places are only suffering local pollution issues. But no; it is said that this pope will address "man-made global climate change," which, again, is a dubious religion at this point.

Will Pope Francis be addressing America with this future encyclical? I hope not. We are far cleaner than the Philippines or China. I hear that most of Europe is also a tidy clean place.

If Pope Francis is addressing 3rd World polluting nations, then why is he picking on the poor who he is always trying to speak up for?

What bearing does this subject have on anyone's soul? Are souls salting the mountains of Hell because they are contributing to "man-made global climate change?"

And finally, if this has nothing to do with our souls, then is this really a judicious and wise use of the pope's time and attention? I thought he was going to "clean house" in the Vatican. But all I've witnessed is Pope Francis kicking out conservative cardinals.

How will Pope Francis talking about weather changes caused by our evil cars and our evil coal plants have any bearing whatsoever on someone seeking out the Lord?  I do not see how climate change or the condition of our individual souls are related in any way. Man-made climate change meets a man's search for faith? I just don't see it.

Tonight, I was told that the rich are ruining the world for the poor via man-made global climate change.

This is a laughable premise that is based on the axiom that climate change is caused by man.  This axiom is false, and Pope Francis' next encyclical may be based on this false axiom. 

Let's look at a hole in the climate change argument.

Recently, NASA tried to come out with a computer model showing a whole bunch of carbon being emitted from Western Countries in the Northern Hemisphere. Laughably, NASA's brand new Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) has demonstrated that there's actually tons of CO2 emissions from the largely non-industrial southern hemisphere. All of the CO2 is actually coming from rainforests.

So, if it's the rainforests that are hurting poor people, hopefully Pope Francis will speak out for deforestation in the Southern Hemisphere in his new encyclical.

Climategate is rife with lies.  Consider that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has fudged a lot of numbers, substituting real temperature data with fabricated computer model numbers.

Wouldn't it be a good idea to--before settling on this man-made climate change assumption--to address a few things, like NOAA, OCO-2 sattelite readings, fraud on the part of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Argo temperature probes, and other such science-sounding things that seem to point away from the idea of man-made global climate change?

Man-made global climate change is unproven at best, and wrong at worst. And the Pope is about to tell us about how we should accept it as a fact.

I am discussing man-made global climate change, which is a silly religion.

However, it is perfectly acceptable to speak out against real pollution. Last I heard, the Pacific Ocean is a sea of trash, Fukushima radiation is washing up on our shores from Alaska to northern California, Chinese smog can be cut with a knife, there are lakes of spilled oil in Africa, and Southeast Asia can be rather litter-filled. Local or regional pollution is a very real thing, for sure. I'm all for conservation, and I'm a big fan of our national parks. Might I add that hunters, in fact, are the best conservationists out there?

It amuses me that people can just skim over things like NGO fraud, rising sea ice, WHO exaggerations about "climate deaths," Hadcrut temperature monitoring, record food production, studies on Pacific atmosphere controls, and other magical science things, and just accept the man-made-global-climate-change premise anyway, and simply skip to attacking a critic as a "climate change denier."

Alas, arguments about the validity of Climategate shall arise in these pitiable times.  And sadly, a drumbeat of lies will win the day with the collective masses.
Hopefully I won't scandalise my fellow traditional Catholic brothers and sisters here by saying that I agree that Global Warming is a real phenomenon, and that it would be prudent to start making efforts (though not heroic) to transition to newer forms of energy.
(12-29-2014, 10:30 AM)Leonhard Wrote: [ -> ]Hopefully I won't scandalise my fellow traditional Catholic brothers and sisters here by saying that I agree that Global Warming is a real phenomenon, and that it would be prudent to start making efforts (though not heroic) to transition to newer forms of energy.

The way I see it is, we're going to have to some time anyway, so we might as well do it now while we use up the rest of the fossil fuels.
Well, I'm hardly a person who likes the industrial destruction of cities, being of a Tolkienesque sensibility myself, and yet I do see the risk of an encyclical like this.
But I think something in this is defensible, if not the theme at least the sort of movement the pope makes: like it or not this is a theme that many people are concerned, and the pope taking a stand on it means he is not confining the Church to a private realm of opinion. I mean, at least the attitude resembles something of St. Paul who would claim that there's no slave nor master, nor jew or gentile, nor male or female, in Christ, dismissing majestically and with a lovely indifference the wisdom of the world.

Anyway, I know this will be one of my unpopular posts. Its just that I have no opinion on the matter (my only fear is that the pope inadvertently makes some immanentist sounding claim, a call for revolution/Eden on Earth, or quasi-pantheistic non-sense).
But to paraphrase Dan Misleh from the Guardian's article, this encyclical will not deal with faith and morals, so in no way it will be infallible. So we can rest.

I also have no reason to doubt the consensus on anthropogenic climate change, and I think that environmental destruction more generally is a serious issue with which Catholics ought to concern themselves. It is completely wrongheaded to suggest that the only two options are "gaia worship" or a completely desacralized, "drill, baby, drill!" view of nature. Christians, in my view, really ought to take part in efforts to preserve nature both out of a concern for our own wellbeing and that of our descendants and simply for its own sake.

On the other hand, I am not entirely sure that I trust Pope Francis to develop anything like a deep theology of the natural world that might inform how Catholics respond to contemporary environmental issues. With occasional exceptions, it seems to me, he usually contents himself with simply repeating the standard international liberal common sense with a few mentions of Christ thrown in before stepping back and letting the media tell us all about his latest radical reversal of the policies and teachings of Pope Benedict, who in these stories is always an American tea partier and fundamentalist Protestant.

In terms of environmental issues, I am not sure that Pope Francis will realize that the managerial and instrumental view of nature that is responsible for so much of our systematic destruction of the natural world is also shared by most of the environmentalist movement and that calls for giving more power to the UN or for more cooperation amongst members of the "international community" will not address the fundamental issues and will only empower rather questionable people and institutions, giving them a new way in which to legitimize the expansion of the global system that has caused many of our environmental problems in the first place. The claim that the encyclical will center on science and economics rather than morality, or presumably theology, adds to my concern here.

On the other hand, the Holy Father's reference to "the evils that tear man from the land of his birth" does make it seem as if he might have at least some inkling of some of the deeper issues, so perhaps the encyclical won't be all bad, though I still suspect his practical suggestions will be the usual boilerplate.

(12-29-2014, 11:56 AM)Crusading Philologist Wrote: [ -> ]With occasional exceptions, it seems to me, he usually contents himself with simply repeating the standard international liberal common sense with a few mentions of Christ thrown in before stepping back and letting the media tell us all about his latest radical reversal of the policies and teachings of Pope Benedict, who in these stories is always an American tea partier and fundamentalist Protestant.
Nonsense. The problem is that you are just tuning into secular reports. The secular media decides when and how to cover what the pope says, while ignoring most of what he says.  I would suggest you Click here.
(12-29-2014, 02:17 AM)LaramieHirsch Wrote: [ -> ]What a great pope we have.  Every day, I go outside to check the weather, and a single tear runs down my cheek.  I am so glad that Pope Francis agrees with Al Gore on this.  America and its industry is so evil. 

I blame capitalism and republicans. 


We were put on this planet to worship Gaia and take care of her.  Someone call Captain Planet


Scientific data does show that global warming has been occurring--that's not the issue--- the debate is about what is causing it. The problem is that this issue has become a political football for both the political left and right. The left claims unfettered industry and the burning of fossil fuels is the cause, while the political right claims it's a natural climatological cycle. The left fires back, claiming the warming is abnormal and occurring at an alarmingly fast rate. The right then claims the scientific data is cooked; the left says the data is overwhelming and has many scientists on board and go on to paint a frightening scenario of cities inundated by high sea levels and increase in oceanic storm systems; the right claims it's a Marxist plot to chain capitalism down, and the argument degenerates from there to name calling. In reality both sides have political and economic interests involved in the mix.

Now, conservative Catholics are alarmed by secular reports about Pope Francis and Global Warming--- before the pope has really said anything about it. But could it be that the West's worship of mammon and industrial progress have something to do with a dramatic change in our global environment? After all, Sacred Scripture itself describes that in the end times "On the earth, nations will be in anguish and perplexity at the roaring and tossing of the sea."--Luke 21:25

Q. What would cause nations on earth to be anguished and perplexed about the roaring and tossing of the sea?

We do know that sin has built-in consequences on both body and soul.. Could rampant materialism, consumerism--- and the wholesale worship of success and money, which Pope Benedict often lamented and warned against , all while most of the world lives in stark poverty---have built-in consequences on a global scale that even the seas are affected? After all, petroleum is at the center of conflicts and wars which have cause so much suffering..
[Image: oil_barrel_stack_350_54538c7453be1.jpg]


      LOL


I have listed almost 10 issues--holes in the theory--of man-made global climate change.  And yet, crickets.  People will keep on believing what they will keep on believing. 

And it is for this reason I never really enter this debate, because it is fruitless. 

Believe what makes you feel good, people.  Smile  Cars are evil.  Pope Francis is a nice man.  Conservatives are silly and stupid.  And if there's a dispute, no one's wrong, and blame goes to all sides of the debate! 

I fully expect Pope Francis fans to go to their local mosque and pray with muslims this week, before the Christmastide is over.  Because the Church in Her prudence knows what She is doing, and you should follow Her example.
(12-30-2014, 12:58 AM)LaramieHirsch Wrote: [ -> ]I have listed almost 10 issues--holes in the theory--of man-made global climate change.  And yet, crickets.  People will keep on believing what they will keep on believing. 

And it is for this reason I never really enter this debate, because it is fruitless. 

Believe what makes you feel good, people.  Smile  Cars are evil.  Pope Francis is a nice man.  Conservatives are silly and stupid.  And if there's a dispute, no one's wrong, and blame goes to all sides of the debate! 

I fully expect Pope Francis fans to go to their local mosque and pray with muslims this week, before the Christmastide is over.  Because the Church in Her prudence knows what She is doing, and you should follow Her example.

Yes, statistics vs statistics. As the saying goes, there are lies, damned lies, and statistics. Unfortunately we live in the age of copying and pitting statistics against statistics--- information which can be spun and weaved in any way to produce any conclusion one wants to conclude---and both political sides have turned the issue into a political football.

But the fact is that just as you can pollute and poison your body to death; so too can man pollute, poison and destroy nature itself..
[Image: Air-pollution-in-London--001.jpg][Image: sabarmati-e1396609494329.jpg]
[Image: extreme-pollution.jpg]
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