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The Faithful Must Adore The Eucharistic Lord To Make Reparation!

By:  Father Mark Kirby

Vultus.stblogs.org

A Cancer at the Heart of the Church

How and why does this sort of thing happen? It causes me a piercing sorrow because it is emblematic of the widespread loss of faith in the adorable mystery of the Most Holy Eucharist that is a cancer at the heart of the Church.

The Erosion of Faith

Several years ago, in the context of a course I was teaching, I suggested that the erosion of faith in the Most Holy Eucharist was, in fact, fostered by a number of liturgical and disciplinary changes:

— Minimalistic approach to the fast before Holy Communion.
— The offering of the Holy Sacrifice by the priest facing the congregation.
— The removal of the communion rail and obfuscation of the sanctuary as “the holy place.”
— The relegation of the tabernacle to the side of the sanctuary.
— The reception of Holy Communion standing, and in the hand.
— The introduction of Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion.

Taken together, these changes sent a chilling message to the Catholic faithful (and even to confused clergy): “Folks, the Blessed Sacrament just isn’t all that we thought it was.”

The Protestantization of Catholic Worship

Let it be noted, en passant, that while all of these changes are a cause of scandal to Eastern Orthodox Christians, not one of them would be considered offensive to mainstream Protestants. When one begins to worship like a Protestant, one begins to believe like a Protestant.

Ignorance


The cumulative effect of these changes, compounded by a woefully deficient sacramental catechesis and by certain lamentable theological, liturgical, and moral sensibilities in seminaries during the 60s, 70s, and 80s, is the current Eucharistic Crisis. Redemptionis Sacramentum (2004) remains, in most dioceses, a document that is virtually unknown. Pope John Paul II’s “Year of the Eucharist” seems to have faded into oblivion; his EncyclicalEcclesia de Eucharistia (2003), and his Apostolic Letter, Mane nobiscum, Domine (2004) seem not to have been assimilated at the parish level. Pope Benedict XVI’s Sacramentum Caritatis (2007) is, in many places, unknown.

Adoration and Reparation

Adoration in a spirit of reparation is more than ever necessary. Where are the adorers and reparators who will console the Heart of Jesus, wounded by the irreverence, coldness, indifference, and sacrilege that He receives “in the house of them that loved Him,” and in the Sacrament of His Love?

As for the much discussed “reform of the reform,” might it not be a case of too little too late? Can anything apart from a Divine Intervention, a new sacerdotal Pentecost, obtained through the intercession of the Maternal Heart of Mary, bring about the change of heart that is needed?
I love Dom. Kirby. Very excellent & holy monastic. In addition to reparation to the Sacred Heart of the Lord, we ought to invoke His Holy Name often to make up for the casual manner in which It is so often spoken at the Novus Ordo Mass.
(01-07-2015, 02:02 PM)Magdalene Wrote: [ -> ]The Protestantization of Catholic Worship

Let it be noted, en passant, that while all of these changes are a cause of scandal to Eastern Orthodox Christians, not one of them would be considered offensive to mainstream Protestants. When one begins to worship like a Protestant, one begins to believe like a Protestant.

I've said it before on here, and it bears repeating; the fact that they are more concerned with seeking communion with Protestants than with us in itself shows how misguided the whole endeavour is.

Not only the liturgical abuses, but the swing towards placating Protestantism and modernity positively lessens the likelihood of communion with the Orthodox, as it drives Rome further and further away from its ancient roots.
(01-07-2015, 02:38 PM)Dirigible Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-07-2015, 02:02 PM)Magdalene Wrote: [ -> ]The Protestantization of Catholic Worship

Let it be noted, en passant, that while all of these changes are a cause of scandal to Eastern Orthodox Christians, not one of them would be considered offensive to mainstream Protestants. When one begins to worship like a Protestant, one begins to believe like a Protestant.

I've said it before on here, and it bears repeating; the fact that they are more concerned with seeking communion with Protestants than with us in itself shows how misguided the whole endeavour is.

Not only the liturgical abuses, but the swing towards placating Protestantism and modernity positively lessens the likelihood of communion with the Orthodox, as it drives Rome further and further away from its ancient roots.

I guess the "powers that be" in Rome think there's a greater chance of protestants coming back to the Church than there is of Orthodox.  Whether that's true or not, you're right...the more Rome forgets, neglects, and even strangles and starves her ancient roots, the less chance there is of *anyone* wanting to become Catholic or return to Catholicism, especially the Orthodox.  The more Rome kowtows to protestantism, the more she risks becoming "just another denomination" and losing her status (shared, imho, with the Orthodox Church) as The Church.
(01-07-2015, 03:13 PM)J Michael Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-07-2015, 02:38 PM)Dirigible Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-07-2015, 02:02 PM)Magdalene Wrote: [ -> ]The Protestantization of Catholic Worship

Let it be noted, en passant, that while all of these changes are a cause of scandal to Eastern Orthodox Christians, not one of them would be considered offensive to mainstream Protestants. When one begins to worship like a Protestant, one begins to believe like a Protestant.

I've said it before on here, and it bears repeating; the fact that they are more concerned with seeking communion with Protestants than with us in itself shows how misguided the whole endeavour is.

Not only the liturgical abuses, but the swing towards placating Protestantism and modernity positively lessens the likelihood of communion with the Orthodox, as it drives Rome further and further away from its ancient roots.

I guess the "powers that be" in Rome think there's a greater chance of protestants coming back to the Church than there is of Orthodox.  Whether that's true or not, you're right...the more Rome forgets, neglects, and even strangles and starves her ancient roots, the less chance there is of *anyone* wanting to become Catholic or return to Catholicism, especially the Orthodox.  The more Rome kowtows to protestantism, the more she risks becoming "just another denomination" and losing her status (shared, imho, with the Orthodox Church) as The Church.

It is, of course, very good to desire the conversion of Protestants; the problem is that the father is turning his home into a pigsty in order to encourage the prodigal to come home. "Look, son, it's just like where you are now, so there's no reason not to come back!"
(01-07-2015, 03:22 PM)Dirigible Wrote: [ -> ]the problem is that the father is turning his home into a pigsty in order to encourage the prodigal to come home. "Look, son, it's just like where you are now, so there's no reason not to come back!"

Uncomfortably accurate, Dirigible...
(01-07-2015, 02:38 PM)Dirigible Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-07-2015, 02:02 PM)Magdalene Wrote: [ -> ]The Protestantization of Catholic Worship

Let it be noted, en passant, that while all of these changes are a cause of scandal to Eastern Orthodox Christians, not one of them would be considered offensive to mainstream Protestants. When one begins to worship like a Protestant, one begins to believe like a Protestant.

I've said it before on here, and it bears repeating; the fact that they are more concerned with seeking communion with Protestants than with us in itself shows how misguided the whole endeavour is.

Not only the liturgical abuses, but the swing towards placating Protestantism and modernity positively lessens the likelihood of communion with the Orthodox, as it drives Rome further and further away from its ancient roots.

The funny thing is that when I read guys like Ratzinger, von Balthasar (or his mentor Przywara) I get the sense they were closer to the East than with Protestants. Yes, they did a lot of dialogue with Prots, but they are always debates and not so much assimilation. Yes, they were critical of the East (at least in some of its modern manifestations), but nothing to the extent of writing articles against its very principles (like in the famous debate between Przywara and Barth).
But of course, contemporary Catholic theology is not exhausted in the Communio crowd (unfortunately, IMO).

Also, I wonder how much communism has to do with this distancing with the East. I mean VII deals from existential problems to back pains, but it has no mention of communism. Supposedly this was because of a deal made with communists (and Dom Lefebvre together with 80 cardinals signed petitions for a discussion of communism, but to no avail). This, of course, was a betrayal committed against our Eastern brothers, and I suspect this (that is, our indifference towards the problems of the East and the difficulty in communicating with the East) is the main historical origin of our predilection to Western Protestantism.


As to the original post, I suggest my fellow Catholics to offer every week our intentions in the Mass for reparations against these grave offenses. And I know its unpleasant to be seen as the trouble maker by kneeling for communion, but it shouldn't matter if its the right thing.
Additionally:

– Benediction after Mass, or Vespers
– Public processions of the Eucharist
– Litany of the Most Blessed Sacrament (via St. Peter Julian Eymard)