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Let's say a person was baptized as an adult but only repented of an old mortal sin years later after the Baptism. Baptism removes all sin and punishment... But if a person is not sorry, when was that sin forgiven - at Baptism or when they repent and confess it later on? Let's say up to that point the person is not contrite for it. Its a confusing situation because we know Baptism makes the soul totally clean. Does the Church have a teaching on this? Thanks!
A person should be admitted to baptism if he or she has the right disposition, and according to the Catechism of Trent one of the necessary conditions for baptism is repentance. Indeed, St. John the Baptist would call people to repentance and baptism, and St. Paul is quite emphatically in all his letter (especially to the Romans) that a person in Christ is dead to sin, and this is what baptism means (cf. Rom. 6, 3). It simply makes no sense an adult freely choosing to be baptized and yet not wanting to leave sin and live the life of Christ—and this is even asked in the rite of baptism, isn't it? As a matter of fact, I don't know how it is today, but back in the day the catechumen before baptism would look to the North (because of Jer. 1, 14) when renouncing Satan and all his works (cf. Dom Guéranger's Explanation of the Mass, pg. 35)--something similar occurs in the Eastern rite, but there even spitting is/was involved, if I'm not mistaken.
I guess I'm asking in the case a person really didn't believe something was a sin from their past life when they were baptized, but later repent.
That's easier: if he didn't know something was a mortal sin it was not a mortal sin.
All sin is forgiven at baptism.
(05-02-2015, 10:27 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote: [ -> ]That's easier: if he didn't know something was a mortal sin it was not a mortal sin.
what about in the case where a person does something really serious, like abortion, and doesn't think its wrong.. But there are different types of ignorance and some actually don't decrease gravity, if I understand correctly. I can't determine that for real people I'm talking hypothetically if the person did something very grave and felt maybe its wrong, still did it, but kept excusing it till years after their Baptism?

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Let's twist this slightly: suppose an unbaptised person wilfully commits a heinous sin such as murder and is entirely unrepentant, and then subsequently has a heart attack and loses consciousness, dying moments later.  In those few moments of unconsciousness before death, a bystander baptises him using the simple formula.  Thus, an unrepentant murderer has just been baptised and therefore wiped clean of all sin and temporal punishment due to sin, right?

Comment.  :popcorn:
There is a formula of necessities for doing a Mortal Sin.  Knowingly, willingly doing, saying, thinking something you know is seriously wrong.

Some sensitive souls  can feel really bad about doing something completely inconsequential... as in the nasty temptation known as "scruples". Ultimately, though, a sin is not a sin unless there is acquiescence in some wrong.

Anyhow, I suggest that adult Baptism  would be no more efficacious in remitting personal sins retained than would an adult Confession. That could make for an interesting discussion.

I once asked a theologian "even if you  weren't in the mob calling "crucify Him, crucify Him" would you be equally guilty if you later said "good job".
(05-03-2015, 01:36 AM)Steven Wrote: [ -> ]Let's twist this slightly: suppose an unbaptised person wilfully commits a heinous sin such as murder and is entirely unrepentant, and then subsequently has a heart attack and loses consciousness, dying moments later.  In those few moments of unconsciousness before death, a bystander baptises him using the simple formula.  Thus, an unrepentant murderer has just been baptised and therefore wiped clean of all sin and temporal punishment due to sin, right?

Comment.  :popcorn:
This is from the Code of Canon Law;

§2. An adult in danger of death can be baptized if, having some knowledge of the principal truths of the faith, the person has manifested in any way at all the intention to receive baptism and promises to observe the commandments of the Christian religion.

http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P2X.HTM