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Hi everyone!

I've only posted once before, so nobody probably knows me yet. My name's Cody and I made a decision to convert to the Catholic faith about two years ago. I'm a recovering addict, and my road in life has been marked with a lot of suffering and a lot of hardship. I'm doing great today, though, and my wife and two beautiful daughters are doing great as well.

I have been validly baptized (in a Protestant community) but I have never been fully initiated into the Church. My work schedule is...heavy, at best. With a family and being in the working class, I have no option to quit my job right off the bat. It has made attending the RCIA classes on Thursday nights next to impossible, and I know of no other way to be initiated into the Church. I have done much study and research on the Faith and other faiths and know wholeheartedly that I believe the dogmas of the Church. Having never received the Sacrament of Reconciliation obviously, I NEVER receive the Eucharist but attend Mass at least once a week on Sundays. (If I have to work, I attend the Saturday night Mass offered at my parish) I'm not sure what to do or how to go about being received into the Church.. My parish priest is very insistent on the RCIA program and has never really suggested or offered any other ideas or guidance. Could someone shed some light on what I should do from here?

Thanks for your time

Cody
(05-02-2015, 09:08 PM)AdesteFideles Wrote: [ -> ]Hi everyone!

:hello!:

Quote:Could someone shed some light on what I should do from here?

I think you should find an older, orthodox Catholic priest -- who need not be a "traditionalist" -- to give you private instruction in the Catholic faith and then arrange for your reception into the Church.

Ten years ago, an Episcopalian man that came to our Courage meetings was instructed and received into the Church by an elderly, old school Redemptorist priest here in Philadelphia. 

I think this is the best approach for you.  It might also prove to be more feasible from the standpoint of scheduling.  And last but not least, it saves you a lot of rank nonsense.
Greetings! Our SSPX priests give private catechisms. Generally at the convenience of the faithful.  I'm assuming it's probably because we have a fairly small parish.  One of our priests actually gave lessons over skype!
I suggest you find another priest (I don't recommend SSPX).  RCIA is unnecessary. If your parish priest insists on it, find another one (again, not SSPX).
Are you regularly attending mass every Sunday?
Are your children enrolled and attending the catechesis every week?
Is your family actively participating in the parish activities?
If so why not talk to the priest about your particular situation and see what can be done.
I'm kinda curious about this. I've seen many Protestants saying they've entered the Church at Easter Vigil. But they were already baptized. Confirmation only happens when the bishop is around. So, what's this all about? How are Protestants received into the Catholic Church besides making a general confession?
(05-03-2015, 12:42 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote: [ -> ]I'm kinda curious about this. I've seen many Protestants saying they've entered the Church at Easter Vigil. But they were already baptized. Confirmation only happens when the bishop is around. So, what's this all about? How are Protestants received into the Catholic Church besides making a general confession?

I was confirmed by my then-parish priest (Novus Ordo), no Bishop around, on an ordinary Sunday. While having the Bishop handle all that at the Easter Vigil is the norm, it isn't necessary, and lots of people are confirmed in the same sort of way I was.

As to the Protestants and Baptism/Confirmation, see above -- and note that most priests like for things to be done in the standard way, with the RCIA classes and all that. It could be, too, that many of the Protestants you're referring to received Conditional Baptism if they weren't sure of the formula used in their old -- um, "faith community." When adult Protestants enter the Church, they are usually (conditionally) baptized if needed, make a Confession, are confirmed, and receive the Eucharist all at the same time (or roughly the same time period).

To the OP:  I'd study on my own, approach a priest and let him know about your inability to do the standard RCIA stuff, and ask to be able to make your Confession and be confirmed (after being conditionally baptized, if necessary) outside the normal routine. He'd undoubtedly oblige you, most likely wanting to meet with you and see "where you're at," what you actually know about the Faith, etc.

You might consider speaking with Fr. Jerry Strange at Assumption on 7th Avenue.  He seems to be running a very good parish, and has both a regular EF Mass (3rd Sunday at 1:20pm) and a regular Syro-Malabar DL (Sundays at 4:30pm).

http://www.assumptionchurchnashville.org
Fr. Jerry Strange, 615-256-2729
The most important aspect of catechism is understanding how to make a good confession. It can cause a lot of stress and embarrassment if you begin receiving communion but you're unsure about what exactly constitutes a mortal sin and what is only venal.
(05-03-2015, 12:42 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote: [ -> ]I'm kinda curious about this. I've seen many Protestants saying they've entered the Church at Easter Vigil. But they were already baptized. Confirmation only happens when the bishop is around. So, what's this all about? How are Protestants received into the Catholic Church besides making a general confession?
Priests of the latin ritehave the power of conferring the sacrament of Confirmation when they have the faculties from their bishop. Priests of teh eastern rites routinly confer the sacrament of Confirmation on infants also. 

From the Code of Canon Law;

Can.  866 Unless there is a grave reason to the contrary, an adult who is baptized is to be confirmed immediately after baptism and is to participate in the eucharistic celebration also by receiving communion.

http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P2X.HTM


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