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From the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros of New York and Caracas, this ivory  figure of the Nino Jesus was carved by an anonymous artist working in the Hispano-Filipino tradition. It dates from the Spanish colonial period, from the 18th Century. The dimensions are 55.5 x 22 x 17.5 cm (21 7/8 x 8 11/16 x 6 7/8 "). The Christ Child is carved from ivory, and the base is gilt wood with inlaid mirrors.

[Image: GqscY2p.jpg]
Ivory head of St. Francis from the collection of The Walters Art Museum of Baltimore, Maryland, acquired by Henry Walters. The carving is in the Baroque style and is dated to approximately 1625-75.

[Image: ClvcCRM.jpg]

From the museum description:
Quote:Carved in the round, St. Francis's neck is shaped like a peg to fit into something else, presumably a torso made of another material. Although documentation is sparse, it is generally assumed by specialists in the field that such heads carved in ivory and intended to be inserted in a torso of a cheaper material are more characteristic of the later 1600s and 1700s. Given that so little is known about ivory carving in Sapin itself and the similarities with the products of ivory carving workshops in the Philippines, it is more likely that such heads (compare also 71.390 and 71.412) were carved in this Spanish colony where the Franciscans were so active.

http://art.thewalters.org/detail/11803/h...of-assisi/
(07-02-2015, 12:24 PM)Neopelagianus Wrote: [ -> ]They also, if I am not mistaken, hide themselves when mating. They are gentle creatures. Pope Leo X even owned one!

If I were ever to go looking for ivory, I would look for a skeletal remains of  a dead elephant, or a mammoth tusk.

I have a passion for ivories! But I like elephants alive too.

N.

Here is an overview of the elephant in ancient and medieval lore, as transmitted through bestiaries:
http://bestiary.ca/beasts/beast77.htm

An interesting allegorization:
Quote:The elephant and its mate represent Adam and Eve. When they were still without sin in the Garden of Eden, they did not mate, but when the dragon seduced them and Eve ate the fruit of the tree and gave some to Adam, they were forced to leave Paradise and enter the world, which was like a turbulent lake of pleasures and passions. The elephants mated and she conceived, and "gave birth on the waters of guilt." The big elephant represents the law, which could not raise up mankind from sin, nor could the twelve elephants, which represent the prophets. Christ is the small elephant who succeeded to raising the fallen. The burning skin and bones of the elephant represent the commandments of God, which allow nothing evil to enter the pure soul.
(07-02-2015, 11:23 AM)Neopelagianus Wrote: [ -> ]Another from the Philippines, 18th Century, Glass Eyes

[Image: tumblr_mumx6aBif21sccwdpo1_400.jpg]

This one is spectacular! I'm going to have to find a replica one for the Fillipina in my life.  :)
(07-02-2015, 03:59 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-02-2015, 11:23 AM)Neopelagianus Wrote: [ -> ]Another from the Philippines, 18th Century, Glass Eyes

[Image: tumblr_mumx6aBif21sccwdpo1_400.jpg]

This one is spectacular! I'm going to have to find a replica one for the Fillipina in my life.  :)
Go to a woodcarver's shop and had one replicated (Elephant Ivory is rare nowadays, and expensive too, although you people there in the US might afford it, it is still expensive).

Also, there are elephant ivory substitutes, such rhino horns, warthog tusks, narwhal tusks, hippo teeth or even bone.

N.
(07-02-2015, 02:26 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: [ -> ]Ivory head of St. Francis from the collection of The Walters Art Museum of Baltimore, Maryland, acquired by Henry Walters. The carving is in the Baroque style and is dated to approximately 1625-75.

[Image: ClvcCRM.jpg]

From the museum description:
Quote:Carved in the round, St. Francis's neck is shaped like a peg to fit into something else, presumably a torso made of another material. Although documentation is sparse, it is generally assumed by specialists in the field that such heads carved in ivory and intended to be inserted in a torso of a cheaper material are more characteristic of the later 1600s and 1700s. Given that so little is known about ivory carving in Sapin itself and the similarities with the products of ivory carving workshops in the Philippines, it is more likely that such heads (compare also 71.390 and 71.412) were carved in this Spanish colony where the Franciscans were so active.

http://art.thewalters.org/detail/11803/h...of-assisi/
I have seen many ivory carvings of St. Francis of Assisi. They are very plentiful indeed. Same goes with statues of St. Anthony of Padua as well as the Immaculate Conception.

N.
(07-02-2015, 10:45 AM)Lady Therese Wrote: [ -> ]The Niño Menino and the Immaculate Conception from Goa are adorable.  However, I can't see the third image.  The Immaculate Conception from the Philippines is very beautiful.  I love the Immaculate Conception: both the Dogma and the Person.
So do I. I love the Immaculate Conception. I was born in a hospital in a town whose parish is dedicated to the Immaculate Conception.

N.
An ivory carving of the Madonna from China:

[Image: 2007BP9414_virgin_child_ivory_custom_290...350924.jpg]
An ivory carving of the same subject, with Chinese influence from the Philippines (She looks like Guan Yin, the Chinese pagan goddess of mercy)

[Image: 4043113745_4d536fbf9b.jpg]
A Corpus carved from ivory. (Philippine school imitating the archaic Gothic form)

[Image: 1020.jpg]
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