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I would like to take my wife to Rome to celebrate our 50th Anniversary. I would like information as to where to stay, and things to see, and attend TLM daily.
Wonderful! Hubs and I were just there for our 25th... We had such an amazing time.  I trust you will, too! We actually went to Venice, Florence, then Rome, and we were only in Rome for three days. We went to Mass at St. Peter's Basilica. St. Peter's will blow your socks off, for sure. It is like nothing else on the face of this earth. There is no doubt to my mind that the Holy Spirit is Present there like nowhere else. What a privilege to have visited!

"The Pilgrim's Guide to Rome's Principal Churches: Illustrated Guided Tours of Fifty-one of the Most Important Churches of Rome", by Joseph N. Tylenda is a great book. I highly recommend reading it before you go, picking out which churches you'd like to see the most and mapping out a plan.
I will say that the unfortunate part about visiting is that many of these amazing churches which contain great masterpieces are that they're sorely in need of repair. Many have become more like museums with the majority of people visiting being tourists who are wandering around checking out the artwork--not that there's anything wrong with that, but so few visitors are ever in the roped off sections reserved for prayer.... Also, unfortunately, some of the churches have closed, so check ahead if you want to see some of the minor churches to make sure they're not just showing a Van Gogh exhibit in the former sanctuary--sad, but happened to us.

As for the TLM, sorry, it was a whirlwind thing for me. We spent the whole time in churches and when not in churches we were at restaurants eating, but no TLM for us.
I had the privilege to go this past April on a pilgrimage and stayed four nights in Rome at a convent that has been converted into a hotel, Casa di Santa Brigida on Piazza Farnese, and I highly recommend it.  From there it is only a 5 minute walk to the FSSP parish, Sanctissima Trinita dei Pelligrini, where you can attend daily mass.  There is daily mass at the convent also, but I don't know if they have a TLM. 

St. Peter's is about a 20 minute walk from the convent.  I absolutely loved Italy and, from the moment I landed, I did not want to leave.  I would definitely recommend you pay a visit to St. John Lateran (the Holy Steps are right by there too) and don't miss St. Mary Major's Basilica.  On the way back from St. Mary Major, we stopped into the Basilica Di Santa Prassede, which contains a section of the pillar on which Jesus was scourged.  All of those places were very beautiful and awe inspiring. 

My FSSP pastor was part of the tour group and offered daily mass and I had the privilege of serving the masses with him at some very beautiful churches.  On our last day before leaving Rome to head to other cities, we took a day excursion to Montecassino and then to Monte San Giovanni Campano, which was easily the highlight of the pilgrimage.  We were allowed to have mass in the room where St. Thomas Aquinas was held captive by his parents, which has been converted into a chapel.  Following that, we were treated to an absolutely amazing six-course lunch in the palace restaurant, Corte d'Avalos Ristorante.  I forgot to mention, the Brigitine sisters serve some excellent meals also at the convent.

It appeared that there are many tour guide services in Rome and you could probably join in with a larger group; however, I have no idea what the fee would be.  Everyone gets a little receiver and earpiece to listen to the tour guide as you go along.  I recommend you contact Syversen Touring  (1-800-334-5425) and ask for some help with your travel arrangements.  They are the family-owned company that I booked my trip with and are absolutely wonderful people - and very Catholic too.  Visit their web site at syversentouring.com.  I'm sure they could assist you with lodging, ground/air transportation services and/or tour guides.  They might be able to help you get tickets to the papal audience also, if that interests you.  We went and the pope stopped to kiss the baby of the woman standing next to me.  Though I'm no fan of his, it was still pretty cool.

Buono fortuna!  Ciao!

I think you should go to Minturno, this little town on the Appian Way, on the coast, about halfway between Rome and Naples. Go to the churches there (there are two main ones) and look up any baptismal and marriage records for the name "Tucciarone." Then send them to me. And send me a postcard :P

Seriously, though (well, I was serious about the above -- not that I think you "should" do it, but I'd be thrilled if ya did):  take an excursion to Pompeii! (you'd likely go through Minturno on the bus there from Rome, I'm guessing LOL). Pompeii would be one of the main things I'd want to see if I were to go to Italy.

In Rome, go see La Bocca della Verita, as in the movie Roman Holiday! (Gregory Peck improvised the bit about his hand getting bitten off LOL):


Go see the Purgatory Museum in a church called Sacro Cuore:


Go to the Catacombs (I haven't watched this documentary). The Catacombs would probably be the number one thing I'd want to see in Italy, just before Vatican City:



Ristorante Checco! Il restairant è magnifico! Andare.

http://www.checcoercarettiere.it/ristora...tevere.php
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I hope you and your wife have a wonderful trip! Get to St. Peter's early because the lines really build up as the day progresses.