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From Die Zeit, translated by Novus Ordo Watch

http://www.novusordowatch.org/wire/revol...rancis.htm

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Revolt Against Francis

High-ranking Vatican clerics are rebelling against Francis’ most recent decision regarding marriage annulments. They are accusing him of giving up an important dogma.

by Julius Müller-Meiningen

They’ve had enough. In three weeks’ time, the Catholic bishops of the world will meet in synod to deliberate about the future course of their church. In Rome, the clergy will encounter an apparatus that is dead set against the Pope, definitively. A dossier is being circulated in the halls of the curia, which has been made available to The Christian and the World of DIE ZEIT [weekly journal included in ZEIT], which systematically lists the alleged sins of the Pope. “Francis has taken off his mask”, a high-ranking Vatican cleric says. Some prelates even feel physical aggression coming up against the Pontiff, and they’re even willing to say so under cover of anonymity [<-- this last sentence has since been removed from the German original, without acknowledgment —Transl., 12-SEP-15].

The trigger for what one can confidently call the preparations for an organized resistance against Francis, was the most recent decree of the 78-year-old Argentinian. With the document he published last Tuesday [Sep. 8], which enables simpler and faster annulments of marriages in church, he set the Church before a fait accompli. Mitis Iudex Dominus is the title of the edict, which is supposed to be in reference to Jesus the meek Judge. But within the curia, the meekness that Francis wants to show the faithful who find themselves in conflict with ecclesiastical norms, is out of the question. A number of monsignors who are officially in charge of directing the affairs of the church at large, are beside themselves.

This is manifest in an incisively-worded dossier that has recently been disseminated throughout the most important offices of the Vatican, including the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and the Secretariat of State. In it, the decree for the simplication of marriage annulments is juridically picked apart. The main accusations [against Francis] are that the Pope bypassed the committees that are in charge of this matter that is of such fundamental importance to the church, and that he has introduced de facto “Catholic divorce”. The report, which is several pages long, speaks of “unsettling developments” and argues that Francis “circumvented” the regulated process for changing legislation for the universal church. Most of the safeguards found in matrimonial annulment trials were deliberately “eliminated”, the report claims.

The importance of matrimony, especially the question how to deal with divorced spouses who marry again [sic], is at the epicenter of the debate about the future direction of the church. The indissolubility of marriage is the dogma conservative clerics stick to. “Divorce the Catholic way”, enabled by the Pope, would mean the worst-case scenario for the guardians [sic] of doctrine such as the German Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Cardinal Gerhard Ludwig Müller. On his desk, too, is found the inofficial bill of indictment against Francis. Muller and his friends, who are spread throughout the curia, fear that the entire edifice will collapse if one of its foundations is removed. In their view, this is a matter of the very continuation of the true Catholic Church.

The introduction of a speedy process for discerning the nullity of marriages under the supervision of the [local] bishop is of particular concern to the Pope’s critics. From their point-of-view, a lot of controverial theological problems were ignored by Francis. Thus in the decree are found several extremely vague reasons that suffice for getting a speedy trial started, such as “lack of faith” or other motives that are not clearly defined. If, as is feared by the Pope’s opponents, this should now lead to a flood of annulments, the problem of admitting remarried divorcees to the sacraments, which has long affected the church, would be practically eliminated. From now on they would be able to simply exit their Catholic marriage, supposedly contracted in perpetuity, without a problem. Per papal decree.

The synod, set to begin October 4, is thus in danger of being turned into a merry-go-round of debate. The Pope — such is the tenor — makes his decisions according to his own pleasure anyway. He didn’t stick to the regular process of changing legislation, according to the seven-page document. The bishops’ conferences as well as all curial offices were bypassed, including the Vatican’s own canon lawyers.

A commission put together by the Pope, which had been ordered to keep silent, quietly drafted the [new] legislation. Otherwise it would presumably have been crushed and prevented by the curial apparatus. Although there were loud protests at the previous synod last fall against the idea of a speedy process for determining the nullity of a marriage under the supervision of the [local] bishop, it nevertheless is now a part of church law — even before the synod could take up the matter once more.

Does the Pope want to impose his long-predetermined course of action with all his might? In the most important offices of the curia, the doubts have long turned into certainty. Many of the faithful, however, will be cheering.

[Julius Muller-Meiningen, “Aufstand gegen Franziskus”, Zeit Online, Sep. 10, 2015; translated by Novus Ordo Watch
V. Let us pray for our Pontiff Francis.

R. May the Lord preserve him, and give him life, and make him blessed upon the earth, and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.

Let us pray.

O God, Shepherd and Ruler of all Thy faithful, look mercifully upon Thy servant Francis, whom Thou hast chosen as shepherd to preside over Thy Church: grant him, we beseech Thee, that, by word and example, he may edify those over whom he hath charge, so that together with the flock committed to him, he may attain everlasting life. Through Christ, our Lord. Amen.
Palace intrigues!
Fr Z wrote about Petin's book recentlu. Here's a quote

Quote:He [John Rist] added: “It seems to me that among both bishops and people there are three groups. There are the people like Burke who want to maintain a traditional line. There are liberals. In between, there are people who are just watching the wind and will do what they think the pope wants them to do. When Benedict was in post, they did what Benedict wanted them to do.”

I suppose this is the first time I'm genuinely scared about which side of a possible (even if only de facto) schism I'd end up.
(09-13-2015, 10:28 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote: [ -> ]Fr Z wrote about Petin's book recentlu. Here's a quote

Quote:He [John Rist] added: “It seems to me that among both bishops and people there are three groups. There are the people like Burke who want to maintain a traditional line. There are liberals. In between, there are people who are just watching the wind and will do what they think the pope wants them to do. When Benedict was in post, they did what Benedict wanted them to do.”

I suppose this is the first time I'm genuinely scared about which side of a possible (even if only de facto) schism I'd end up.

I've noticed that certain bishops just do what they're told, or rather they be what they think the current pontificate wants them to be. Cdl. Dolan, Cdl. Wuerl, and even Cdl. O'Malley seemed pretty good ten years ago. I have books by two of them that I enjoyed and I've seen them mentioned in other books as among the more faithful American bishops.  In Milwaukee, Dolan was much better than his predecessor, Abp. Weakland. Cdl. O'Malley seemed pretty good in Boston simply because he wasn't Cdl. Law. I don't know much about Cdl. Wuerl, but I remember hearing good things about him years ago before he was a bishop and I read in a book that mentioned that he was a good priest (it may have been "Goodbye, Good Men," I can't remember).

I guess a good thing that can come out of all this mess is that it helps us see others' true colors. Are they faithful to Christ and His Church and unwilling to compromise on the truth, or are they faithful to this passing age.
My reservations and suspicions about Pope Francis continue and are deepening, especially after reading this email I received today. It is a rather detailed article of the current discussion on this thread.

What is up with him???



Quote:Pope Attacked Over Motu Proprio; Cardinal Kasper Reasserts His Proposal

BY EDWARD PENTIN 09/11/2015

Reports have emerged that a seven-page dossier, obtained by the German newspaper Die Zeit, is circulating around the curia in which senior Vatican officials have voiced discontent with the recent change in Church law on annulments, and an absence of consultation over the matter.

On Tuesday, the Pope made sweeping reforms to make the process of obtaining a declaration of nullity simpler, quicker and cheaper.

According to Die Zeit, the officials juridically “picked apart” the Pope’s motu proprio (papal decree) on annulment reform, accuse the Holy Father of giving up an important dogma, and assert that he has introduced de facto “Catholic divorce”.

Further concerns mentioned in the document are that, despite the gravity of the issue, no dicasteries, including apparently the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith as well as bishops conferences, were consulted about the decision — a claim the Register has had confirmed by numerous sources. The dossier says usual legislative channels have been "undermined" as "none of the planned steps of a legislative procedure have been followed."

Critics say this goes against the Pope's calls for synodality and collegiality, and resembles an ecclesialized "Führerprinzip", ruling from the top down, by decree and without any consultation or any checks. 

Instead, the papal commission that drafted the motu proprio had been ordered to keep silent throughout the drafting process, probably to avoid the reforms being thwarted by the CDF and others in the curia. But the report also alleges that even the commission did not see the final draft, and that an Italian cardinal along with two others "fiercely" tried to prevent the motu proprio being published before the synod but without success.

The Register has learned via other sources that this decision and others are effectively isolating the CDF and that the Pope is steadily making their work superfluous.

The report also voices concern that the motu proprio will lead to a flood of annulments and that from now on, couples would be able to simply exit their Catholic marriage without a problem.

“A number of monsignors who are officially in charge of directing the affairs of the Church at large, are beside themselves" and feel obligated to "speak up", according to Die Zeit. They are also concerned about the "extremely vague" language used in the motu proprio, especially the reasons for a speedy trial, such as “lack of faith” or other motives that are not clearly defined.

Although the need to streamline the annulments process gained a two-thirds consensus at last year’s synod, the report also points out that synod fathers loudly protested against the idea of a speedy process for determining the nullity of a marriage under the supervision of the local bishop. Now it is Church law, even before the synod could discuss it.

We hope to look into these claims in more detail in the near future.

Meanwhile, in a fresh interview, Cardinal Walter Kasper has returned to pushing forward his proposal for readmitting Catholics to Holy Communion, saying he is “confident” that a “broad consensus” can be found.

He also said in the Sept. 11 interview with Vatican Insider that it’s “necessary to wisely build” such a consensus over the proposal.

The cardinal’s comments come a few days after many felt Pope Francis’ annulment reform upended the Kasper proposal by offering a compromise to both sides.

Kasper’s remarks, however, show his determination to reassert his proposal which consists of allowing civilly remarried divorcees receive Holy Communion after a penitential period. It also proposes that readmittance can take place after “an honest judgment of the person concerned about his own personal situation” and support from the sacramental confessor. The process would be overseen by the local bishop.

Widely supported by the German hierarchy, the proposal has been firmly rejected by prominent theologians and Church leaders as a serious abuse of the sacraments of the Eucharist, marriage and penance. It also failed to reach a two-thirds majority at the previous synod in October, although the Pope insisted it remain in the list of propositions to be discussed for the forthcoming synod next month.

Cardinal Kasper’s comments come as tensions rise ahead of the Ordinary Synod on the Family in October. Yesterday, it emerged that 50 concerned theologians have appealed to Pope Francis to uphold the teachings of Humanae Vitae (Bl. Paul VI’s encyclical banning contraception) and Veritatis Splendor (Pope St. John Paul II’s 1993 encyclical underlining the Church’s moral teaching).

The signatories, who include Jesuit Father Kevin Flannery, professor of moral philosophy professor at the Pontifical Gregorian University, and philosophy Professor Robert Spaemann, a close ally of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, argue that a specific paragraph in the Instrumentum Laboris (working document) for the synod is gravely flawed, effectively emptying Humanae Vitae of its central teaching.

Update 12 Sept: Some additions to the text and improvements to the translation have since been inserted in this post.
(09-13-2015, 03:09 PM)Credidi Propter Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-13-2015, 10:28 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote: [ -> ]Fr Z wrote about Petin's book recentlu. Here's a quote

Quote:He [John Rist] added: “It seems to me that among both bishops and people there are three groups. There are the people like Burke who want to maintain a traditional line. There are liberals. In between, there are people who are just watching the wind and will do what they think the pope wants them to do. When Benedict was in post, they did what Benedict wanted them to do.”

I suppose this is the first time I'm genuinely scared about which side of a possible (even if only de facto) schism I'd end up.

I've noticed that certain bishops just do what they're told, or rather they be what they think the current pontificate wants them to be. Cdl. Dolan, Cdl. Wuerl, and even Cdl. O'Malley seemed pretty good ten years ago. I have books by two of them that I enjoyed and I've seen them mentioned in other books as among the more faithful American bishops.  In Milwaukee, Dolan was much better than his predecessor, Abp. Weakland. Cdl. O'Malley seemed pretty good in Boston simply because he wasn't Cdl. Law. I don't know much about Cdl. Wuerl, but I remember hearing good things about him years ago before he was a bishop and I read in a book that mentioned that he was a good priest (it may have been "Goodbye, Good Men," I can't remember).

I guess a good thing that can come out of all this mess is that it helps us see others' true colors. Are they faithful to Christ and His Church and unwilling to compromise on the truth, or are they faithful to this passing age.


Many of these bishops simply do what they need to do to keep their ecclesiastical careers and the benefits that go with them. I suppose they just follow the lead of whoever happens to be in charge the same way most subordinates in a workplace change their tunes simply to survive when a new manager comes in with a new style.  Adapt or perish, that's the name of the game.

Think about it, throughout history very few have really bucked the trends.
"Some prelates even feel physical aggression coming up against the Pontiff"

What exactly does that mean? The prelates are being roughed up, or they are prepared to rough up the pope?

C.
(09-13-2015, 08:03 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-13-2015, 03:09 PM)Credidi Propter Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-13-2015, 10:28 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote: [ -> ]Fr Z wrote about Petin's book recentlu. Here's a quote

Quote:He [John Rist] added: “It seems to me that among both bishops and people there are three groups. There are the people like Burke who want to maintain a traditional line. There are liberals. In between, there are people who are just watching the wind and will do what they think the pope wants them to do. When Benedict was in post, they did what Benedict wanted them to do.”

I suppose this is the first time I'm genuinely scared about which side of a possible (even if only de facto) schism I'd end up.

I've noticed that certain bishops just do what they're told, or rather they be what they think the current pontificate wants them to be. Cdl. Dolan, Cdl. Wuerl, and even Cdl. O'Malley seemed pretty good ten years ago. I have books by two of them that I enjoyed and I've seen them mentioned in other books as among the more faithful American bishops.  In Milwaukee, Dolan was much better than his predecessor, Abp. Weakland. Cdl. O'Malley seemed pretty good in Boston simply because he wasn't Cdl. Law. I don't know much about Cdl. Wuerl, but I remember hearing good things about him years ago before he was a bishop and I read in a book that mentioned that he was a good priest (it may have been "Goodbye, Good Men," I can't remember).

I guess a good thing that can come out of all this mess is that it helps us see others' true colors. Are they faithful to Christ and His Church and unwilling to compromise on the truth, or are they faithful to this passing age.


Many of these bishops simply do what they need to do to keep their ecclesiastical careers and the benefits that go with them. I suppose they just follow the lead of whoever happens to be in charge the same way most subordinates in a workplace change their tunes simply to survive when a new manager comes in with a new style.  Adapt or perish, that's the name of the game.

Think about it, throughout history very few have really bucked the trends.

These bishops should be doing what they have to do to save their souls.  Jesus said, "for he that will save his life, shall lose it: and he that shall lose his life for my sake, shall find it."
(09-14-2015, 01:22 AM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]"Some prelates even feel physical aggression coming up against the Pontiff"

What exactly does that mean? The prelates are being roughed up, or they are prepared to rough up the pope?

C.

I noticed this on a video from another thread, too. I'm not sure anyone knows what it means, myself included  :Hmm:
I originally took it to mean rough up the pope, but I see what you're saying now that the prelates could be receiving aggression for disagreeing with the pope. Either way, ominous indeed  :(