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http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2015/12/...nt/1195224
Quote:Blessed Teresa of Calcutta is to be made a Saint. Pope Francis on Thursday authorized the Congregation for the Causes of Saints to promulgate a decree regarding a miracle attributed to the intercession of Blessed Teresa (nee Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu).
Blessed Teresa, known around the world as Mother Teresa was born August 26, 1910 and died September 5, 1997. She was foundress of the Congregation of the Missionaries of Charity and the Missionaries of Charity.
Other decrees authorized by the Holy Father concerned the heroic virtues of the Servant of God Giuseppe Ambrosoli, professed priest of the Comboni Missionaries of the Heart of Jesus; born July 25th, 1923 and died March 27, 1987;
The heroic virtues of Servant of God Adolfo (nee Lanzuela Leonardo Martínez), professed religious of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools; He was born on November 8, 1894 and died March 14, 1976;

The heroic virtues of Servant of God Henry Hahn, Laico; born August 29, 1800 and died on March 11, 1882.
The Pope’s approval for these decrees came during a private audience with Cardinal Angelo Amato SDB, prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.

I don't think there was any doubt that this would eventually occur. One of the most holy people of the 20th century.
Yay! We need as many saints as we can get, and she is certainly a great one.
This is excellent news. Unfortunately, many people only think she was holy simply because she cared for the poor. Fewer people are familiar with her prayer life or the spiritual darkness which she experienced and persevered through for decades. Mother Teresa is a model of authentic Catholic social justice- love of neighbor fueled by love of God.
Pope Francis said that she scared him.

http://news.yahoo.com/mother-teresa-scar...QRzZWMDc3I

:LOL: :LOL: :LOL:
Like so many others around the world, I was overjoyed to hear of the recent decision of the Vatican to canonize Mother Teresa, a woman generally recognized, during her lifetime, to be a "living saint." Mother Teresa first came to my attention through Malcolm Muggeridge's film and attendant book Something Beautiful for God. Of course Muggeridge showed Mother's work with the dying and the poorest of the poor on the streets of Kolkata, but what moved me the most were the images of the saint's smile amidst so much squalor and suffering. She was a very bright light shining in exceptionally thick darkness.



 
Mother's life reveals so many aspects and profiles of holiness, but I would like to focus on three of them. First, she shows something remarkable about love, which is not a sentiment but rather willing the good of the other. I think it is fair to say that Mother Teresa went to extremes in demonstrating love in this proper sense. She renounced practically everything that, in the opinion of the world, makes life pleasant -- wealth, material goods, power, comforts, luxuries -- in order to be of service to those in need. Further, for decades, she personally reached out to the most vulnerable in one of the worst slums in the world and sent her sisters to some of the most disagreeable places on the planet. Most of us, I imagine, manage to love to a degree, but few ever express this theological virtue more dramatically and radically than she did. This is not simply admirable, it constitutes a crucial witness to the nature of love. Unlike the other virtues, both natural and theological, love has no limit. Justice, limitlessly expressed, excludes all mercy; too much temperance becomes a fussy puritanism; exaggerated courage is rashness; unlimited faith is credulity; infinite hope devolves into presumption. But there can never be too much love; there is never a time when love is inappropriate, for love is what God is, and love constitutes the very life of heaven. Mind you, in heaven there is no need for faith and hope fades away. But in that supremely holy place, love remains in all of its infinite intensity and radicality. Mother Teresa's way of life, accordingly, is an icon of the love that will obtain in heaven, when we are drawn utterly into the very life of God.
 
A second feature of Mother's holiness is her dedication to prayer. When I visited the Mother House of the Missionaries of Charity in Kolkata some years ago, what impressed me most was a life-size statue of Mother Teresa in the very back of the chapel, in the attitude she customarily assumed when she prayed: legs folded under her, palms facing upward, head bowed. From the very beginning of her community, Mother insisted that her sisters should engage in substantial amounts of prayer every day; and in time, she established a branch of her order dedicated exclusively to contemplative prayer. She understood something that is essential to the Christian spiritual life, namely, that the kind of love she and her sisters endeavored to practice could come only through the grace of God, only as a sheer gift. To get that gift, it was necessary to ask, to ask again, to beg one's whole life long. Without this explicit connection to God and his purposes, their work, she knew, would turn into mere do-goodism, and the egos of her sisters would inevitably assert themselves. Saints, those who embody the love that God is, are necessarily beggars.



I remarked above that Mother Teresa struck me as a light in the shadows. How mysterious, therefore, that she herself once said, "If I ever become a saint, I will surely be a saint of darkness." She was referring to something that only a handful of people knew in her lifetime, that for upwards of fifty years, Mother Teresa experienced the pain of the absence of God. The living saint often felt abandoned by God or even that God does not exist. Once a visiting bishop was kneeling in prayer before the Blessed Sacrament with Mother and her nuns. A note was passed to him from the saintly foundress, which read, to his infinite surprise, "Where is Jesus?" That she lived through this crucible for decades, even as people routinely saw her as the very paragon of holiness, shows forth a third dimension of her saintliness. To be a saint is to allow Christ to live his life in you. Indeed, St. Paul said, "It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me;" and this means the wholeChrist. Jesus was a person of service to the poor and needy, and Mother certainly embodied this aspect of his life; Jesus was a person who prayed intently and for long periods of time, and Mother participated in this dimension of his existence. But Jesus was also the crucified Lord, who said, at the limit of his suffering, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" To allow Christ to live his life in you is, therefore, necessarily to experience, to one degree or another, the absence of God, to undergo the agony of the crucifixion in all of its dimensions. St. John of the Cross, the greatest mystical theologian in the Church's history said, quite simply, that there is no path to holiness that does not lead through the cross. Though it is a high paradox, the fifty-year darkness that Mother endured is, therefore, one of the surest indicators of her saintliness.
 
Saints exist for the Church, for in them we see the very raison d'etre of the Church, and this is why canonizations are always joyful affairs. So let us rejoice in this new saint whose love, prayer, and very darkness, are light for us.

http://www.zenit.org/en/articles/saint-o...f-darkness
She certainly appeared to a very humble and loving person.  That being said, some of her practices and beliefs would hardly be considered as orthodox according to pre-Vatican II standards of canonization. 

From a Time Magazine interview, 1989:

Time Magazine: What do you think of Hinduism?

Mother Teresa: "I love all religions..... "

"I’ve always said we should help a Hindu become a better Hindu, a Muslim become a better Muslim, a Catholic become a better Catholic....”-Mother Teresa (Mark Zima, Mother Teresa: The Case for the Cause (Is Mother Teresa of Calcutta a Saint?) (Nashville: Cold Tree Press, 2007), p. 29.)

Man is free to embrace the religion that gives him peace, joy and love....If the individual thinks and believes that his or her way is the only way to God, then that is their way of salvation” (!)(Mother Teresa: The Case for The Cause, Mark Michael Zima)

Mother Teresa said, “We never try to convert those who receive [aid from Missionaries of Charity] to Christianity but in our work we bear witness to the love of God’s presence and if Catholics, Protestants, Buddhists, or agnostics become for this better men - simply better - we will be satisfied” (Mother Teresa: The Case for The Cause, p. 47).

Not trying to convert non-Catholics is one thing, but to positively affirm them....?

In 1976, Mother Teresa organized a 25th-anniversary celebration of the Missionaries of Charity. As part of the celebration, she obtained permission from the Archbishop of Calcutta for her and her sisters to pray in some pagan temples—non-Christian houses of worship—each day of the jubilee. “Her desire was for each group to hold its own worship service of thanksgiving. Hindus, Sikhs, Zoroastrians, Buddhists, Jains, Jews, Catholics, Orthodox, Protestants and so forth joined her and her sisters to thank the one true God in their own way. She and her sister prayed at eighteen different worship sites,” including Hindu temples. (Mark Zima, Mother Teresa: The Case for the Cause (Is Mother Teresa of Calcutta a Saint?) (Nashville: Cold Tree Press, 2007), p. 65)

And yet

"It is impious to say, “I respect every religion.” This is as much as to say: I respect the devil as much as God, vice as much as virtue, falsehood as much as truth, dishonesty as much as honesty, Hell as much as Heaven."-(Fr. Michael Müller, C.Ss.R., The Church and Her Enemies [1880])

"Every familiarity should be avoided, not only with those impious libertines who openly promote the character of the sect, but also with those who hide under the mask of universal tolerance, respect for all religions, and the craving to reconcile the maxims of the Gospel with those of the revolution. These men seek to reconcile Christ and Belial..."- Pope Leo XIII, Custodi di quella fede, n. 15.

Here is Mother Teresa in 1975 in prayer with Buddhists where a statue of Buddha is on the altar http://www.traditioninaction.org/Revolut...aBudha.htm

Not discerning her interior intentions, that is objectively troubling for any Catholic conscience to witness. 

It seems as though this is all very close to religious indifferentism and liturgical worship w/non-Christian elements/syncretism seem to abound.  I don't have any personal judgement for the woman, as she was obviously extremely generous and self sacrificing.  However, is affirming non-Catholics in their false religions now not only compatible with the new conciliar Faith, but serves as a model for all Catholics to emulate..?

(12-19-2015, 06:37 AM)Poche Wrote: [ -> ]Pope Francis said that she scared him.

http://news.yahoo.com/mother-teresa-scar...QRzZWMDc3I

:LOL: :LOL: :LOL:

Good ol' secular media. I love how they took the offhand quote (I'm assuming was intended as humor) to be the headline,  yet buried the part about "admiring "the strength and the decisive character of her involvement"." toward the bottom of the article.
(01-07-2016, 02:43 PM)Sir Charles Napier Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-19-2015, 06:37 AM)Poche Wrote: [ -> ]Pope Francis said that she scared him.

http://news.yahoo.com/mother-teresa-scar...QRzZWMDc3I

:LOL: :LOL: :LOL:

Good ol' secular media. I love how they took the offhand quote (I'm assuming was intended as humor) to be the headline,  yet buried the part about "admiring "the strength and the decisive character of her involvement"." toward the bottom of the article.

I think it was the strength of character and decisive character of her involvement that scared him.
??? ??? ???
(01-07-2016, 02:14 PM)BC Wrote: [ -> ]She certainly appeared to a very humble and loving person.  That being said, some of her practices and beliefs would hardly be considered as orthodox according to pre-Vatican II standards of canonization. 

From a Time Magazine interview, 1989:

Time Magazine: What do you think of Hinduism?

Mother Teresa: "I love all religions..... "

"I’ve always said we should help a Hindu become a better Hindu, a Muslim become a better Muslim, a Catholic become a better Catholic....”-Mother Teresa (Mark Zima, Mother Teresa: The Case for the Cause (Is Mother Teresa of Calcutta a Saint?) (Nashville: Cold Tree Press, 2007), p. 29.)

Man is free to embrace the religion that gives him peace, joy and love....If the individual thinks and believes that his or her way is the only way to God, then that is their way of salvation” (!)(Mother Teresa: The Case for The Cause, Mark Michael Zima)

Mother Teresa said, “We never try to convert those who receive [aid from Missionaries of Charity] to Christianity but in our work we bear witness to the love of God’s presence and if Catholics, Protestants, Buddhists, or agnostics become for this better men - simply better - we will be satisfied” (Mother Teresa: The Case for The Cause, p. 47).

Not trying to convert non-Catholics is one thing, but to positively affirm them....?

In 1976, Mother Teresa organized a 25th-anniversary celebration of the Missionaries of Charity. As part of the celebration, she obtained permission from the Archbishop of Calcutta for her and her sisters to pray in some pagan temples—non-Christian houses of worship—each day of the jubilee. “Her desire was for each group to hold its own worship service of thanksgiving. Hindus, Sikhs, Zoroastrians, Buddhists, Jains, Jews, Catholics, Orthodox, Protestants and so forth joined her and her sisters to thank the one true God in their own way. She and her sister prayed at eighteen different worship sites,” including Hindu temples. (Mark Zima, Mother Teresa: The Case for the Cause (Is Mother Teresa of Calcutta a Saint?) (Nashville: Cold Tree Press, 2007), p. 65)

And yet

"It is impious to say, “I respect every religion.” This is as much as to say: I respect the devil as much as God, vice as much as virtue, falsehood as much as truth, dishonesty as much as honesty, Hell as much as Heaven."-(Fr. Michael Müller, C.Ss.R., The Church and Her Enemies [1880])

"Every familiarity should be avoided, not only with those impious libertines who openly promote the character of the sect, but also with those who hide under the mask of universal tolerance, respect for all religions, and the craving to reconcile the maxims of the Gospel with those of the revolution. These men seek to reconcile Christ and Belial..."- Pope Leo XIII, Custodi di quella fede, n. 15.

Here is Mother Teresa in 1975 in prayer with Buddhists where a statue of Buddha is on the altar http://www.traditioninaction.org/Revolut...aBudha.htm

Not discerning her interior intentions, that is objectively troubling for any Catholic conscience to witness. 

It seems as though this is all very close to religious indifferentism and liturgical worship w/non-Christian elements/syncretism seem to abound.  I don't have any personal judgement for the woman, as she was obviously extremely generous and self sacrificing.  However, is affirming non-Catholics in their false religions now not only compatible with the new conciliar Faith, but serves as a model for all Catholics to emulate..?

One of the last acts of Pope Benedict XVI addressed this issue;

http://w2.vatican.va/content/benedict-xv...ritas.html
One of the last acts of Pope Benedict XVI addressed this issue;

http://w2.vatican.va/content/benedict-xv...ritas.html
[/quote]

Which issue is addressed, specifically? Appearances of religious indifferentism...love of false religions....syncretism...?
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