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Full Version: The “New” Rosary: It’s Time to Say Goodbye
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Really an interesting article...it convinced me. Smile  Bye Bye Luminous Mysteries.

http://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.ph...ay-goodbye
I've always thought of the Luminous mysteries as a sort of Rosary based chaplet and not part of the actual rosary. I think its a nice thing to meditate on but its definitely not worth the honor of being called part of the Rosary. It really irks me when people say "20 mysteries of the Rosary", it completely breaks the symbolism of the numbers.
In the Obras Completas of Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz there are meditations on the 15 mysteries of the Rosary. The mysteries are significantly different from the mysteries that we have today. This was written in the 17th century.
Huh? Huh? Huh?
(02-11-2016, 12:21 AM)Poche Wrote: [ -> ]In the Obras Completas of Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz there are meditations on the 15 mysteries of the Rosary. The mysteries are significantly different from the mysteries that we have today. This was written in the 17th century.
Huh? Huh? Huh?

Her Mysteries were a part of a specific 9-day exercise focused on the Virgin's sufferings during Christ's Incarnation, not a replacement for or addition to the traditional Rosary. And they were 15 in number, maintaining the relationship between the Rosary and the Psalms.
(02-10-2016, 10:01 PM)Qoheleth Wrote: [ -> ]Really an interesting article...it convinced me. Smile  Bye Bye Luminous Mysteries.

http://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.ph...ay-goodbye

The "Luminous Mysteries" have never seemed right to me.  Pope John Paul II introduced them when I was planning to become Catholic.  As little as I knew back then, it still didn't seem right.  I certainly didn't realize yet that many people wanted to destroy Catholic tradition.  I thought the Novus Ordo was just an anomaly.  The Rosary has traditionally been known as the Marian Psalter, because the number of Hail Marys corresponded with the number of psalms.  The rosary was a more practical "alternative" to praying the Psalter for lay monks and nuns (as opposed to choir monks and nuns) as well as lay people who were not consecrated.  While the mysteries themselves are worthy of meditation, they are not part of the rosary.  If he wanted to make a new chaplet or something, he should have done so and left the existing ones alone.

I have a lot of respect for John Paul II.  He went to the ends of the earth to show my generation that God loves us, he spoke against communism, and he showed the world how to persevere through suffering.  He also made some huge mistakes that have cost the Church dearly, and if history looks at things honestly, it will see him in a much different light than how he is remembered by many today.
I read that article, too, and I decided to just forego the added Luminous "mysteries" although I have incorporated them half-heartedly over the past few years.  I think I will just stick "obstinately" to the original plan.
Now I feel better for never having said the ADDED mysteries.  I didn't understand why something that was perfect needed to be changed.
Either the people over time will accept these new mysteries or they will not. It's hard to say what will be the case, as we are too close to the time of their suggested addition to know for sure. What I do know is that most books and pamphlets these days explaining the rosary add the Luminous Mysteries as part of the rosary, not as optional. Rome has never said they are official, but the impression given in many books is that they are just part of the rosary.

That being said, the Rosary Confraternity still does not force one to pray the Luminous Mysteries to gain their indulgences because officially they are just a suggested addition.


Time will tell though.  It's true, the history of the Rosary as Mary's Psalter and the 150 Hail Marys as almost icons of the psalms was disrupted big time with the Luminous Mysteries.

They are beautiful to meditate on in and of themselves, but they ought never to become official. Time will tell...
The Luminous mysteries of the rosary are optional so people should feel free to use them or not. Personally I chose not to pray them a long time ago, adding the Luminous mysteries messed up the the simple rhythm of the mysteries

Mon - Joyful
Tue - Sorrowful
Wed - Glorious
Thu - Joyful
Fri - Sorrowful
Sat - Glorious
Sun - (Advent - Joyful, Lent - Sorrowful, Otherwise - glorious)

That is very simple and straightforward, not to mention adding mysteries out dates all the Rosary art and music we have throughout the ages. Should Philip Glass be hired to write Sonatas for the Luminous Mysteries to keep Biber's Rosary Sonatas complete?


The bigger question is why? Adding mysteries to the Rosary, communion in the hand, change the Mass, etc etc etc Why? Why? Why?

If you take Catholicism then tweak every single thing about Catholicism is it still Catholicism?

(02-11-2016, 08:34 AM)CaptCrunch73 Wrote: [ -> ]The Luminous mysteries of the rosary are optional so people should feel free to use them or not. Personally I chose not to pray them a long time ago, adding the Luminous mysteries messed up the the simple rhythm of the mysteries

Mon - Joyful
Tue - Sorrowful
Wed - Glorious
Thu - Joyful
Fri - Sorrowful
Sat - Glorious
Sun - (Advent - Joyful, Lent - Sorrowful, Otherwise - glorious)

That is very simple and straightforward, not to mention adding mysteries out dates all the Rosary art and music we have throughout the ages. Should Philip Glass be hired to write Sonatas for the Luminous Mysteries to keep Biber's Rosary Sonatas complete?


The bigger question is why? Adding mysteries to the Rosary, communion in the hand, change the Mass, etc etc etc Why? Why? Why?

If you take Catholicism then tweak every single thing about Catholicism is it still Catholicism?

I would say it's complicated. I definitely identify with the old Believers who saw that inner and outer are related so much so that if you change the externals you risk changing the Faith itself. In fact you actually do change it. How you pray determines how you believe. It's absolutely true. I've seen it in my own life.  For instance, if I start praying the rosary or the breviary I am drawn in spite of myself to start thinking like a traditional Latin Rite Carholic, but if I start praying from my Horologion and using my prayerrope I'm drawn to all things Eastern. The externals matter a great deal. They are the means by which we somehow understand and grow in our faith.



On the other hand there is development. Just what is legitimate and what isn't is up for debate though.

I would suggest that the addition of the luminous mysteries as anything more than optional is not legitimate though.

One thing that comes to mind is the question of authority, exactly who has the right to arbitrarily change our traditions? Were any of the 20th century changes ( breviary, Holy Week, fasting requirements, all of the post conciliar changes...) legitimate exercises of authority or abuses? Does any man--- pope or not--- have the authority to simply tinker with the Faith? Do we learn our Faith through the liturgy and our devotions or not?

These are things that I've often thought about. I'm definitely more eastern. I've got no love whatsoever for papal maximalism and tinkering no matter who it is.

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