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http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2016/03/...ay/1218007

Of all the days this could have happened, it was on Good Friday.
Never in his wildest psychotic delusions could Luther ever imagine that his main condemned doctrines would be proclaimed on a Holy Friday, by the official preacher of the Pontifical Household, before whom he called the "the devilish scum in Rome". He could never have imagined that his whole ecclesiastic revolution would be celebrated five centuries later by the Church itself. The same Church he called a "diabolical institution " and the "great whore of Babylon".


At St Peter's Basilica, the Preacher of the Pontifical Household, Father Raniero Cantalamessa, O.F.M. Cap., gave the homily for the Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion.

"It is when God creates the world and free human beings in it that love ceases for God to be nature and becomes grace. This love is a free concession; it is hesed, grace and mercy. The sin of human beings does not change the nature of this love but causes it to make a qualitative leap: mercy as a gift now becomes mercy as forgiveness. Love goes from being a simple gift to become a suffering love because God suffers when his love is rejected. "The LORD has spoken: ‘Sons have I reared and brought up, but they have rebelled against me’” (Is 1:2). Just ask the many fathers and mothers who have experienced their children’s rejection if it does not cause suffering—and one of the most intense sufferings in life."

God shows his righteousness and justice by having mercy! This is the great revelation. The apostle says God is “just and justifying,” that is, he is just to himself when he justifies human beings; he is in fact love and mercy, so for that reason he is just to himself—he truly demonstrates who he is—when he has mercy.
But we cannot understand any of this if we do not know exactly what the expression “the righteousness of God” means. There is a danger that people can hear about the righteousness of God but not understand its meaning, so instead of being encouraged they are frightened. St. Augustine had already clearly explained its meaning centuries ago: “The ‘righteousness of God’ is that by which we are made righteous, just as ‘the salvation of God’ [see Ps 3:8] means the salvation by which he saves us.”[2] In other words, the righteousness of God is that by which God makes those who believe in his Son Jesus acceptable to him. It does not enact justice but makes people just.

Luther deserves the credit for bringing this truth back when its meaning had been lost over the centuries, at least in Christian preaching, and it is this above all for which Christianity is indebted to the Reformation, whose fifth centenary occurs next year. The reformer later wrote that when he discovered this, “I felt that I was altogether born again and had entered paradise itself through open gates.”

Full text from Source:
http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2016/03/...ay/1218007


Remember, as Catholics, the main condemnations to the aforementioned "doctrines" proclaimed with total self-confidence in the Basilica St. Peters on good Friday are:

The Council of Trent, VI Session " DECREE CONCERNING JUSTIFICATION"Denzinger-Hünermann 1520-1583 .
http://www.ecatholic2000.com/trent/untit...c385685495

1558:
CANON VIII.-If any one saith, that the fear of hell,-whereby, by grieving for our sins, we flee unto the mercy of God, or refrain from sinning,-is a sin, or makes sinners worse; let him be anathema.

1560:
CANON X.-If any one saith, that men are just without the justice of Christ, whereby He merited for us to be justified; or that it is by that justice itself that they are formally just; let him be anathema.

1561:
CANON XI.-If any one saith, that men are justified, either by the sole imputation of the justice of Christ, or by the sole remission of sins, to the exclusion of the grace and the charity which is poured forth in their hearts by the Holy Ghost, and is inherent in them; or even that the grace, whereby we are justified, is only the favour of God; let him be anathema.

1562:
CANON XII.-If any one saith, that justifying faith is nothing else but confidence in the divine mercy which remits sins for Christ's sake; or, that this confidence alone is that whereby we are justified; let him be anathema.

1571:
CANON XXI.-If any one saith, that Christ Jesus was given of God to men, as a redeemer in whom to trust, and not also as a legislator whom to obey; let him be anathema.

1583:
CANON XXXIII.-If any one saith,that,by the Catholic doctrine touching Justification, by this holy Synod inset forth in this present decree, the glory of God, or the merits of our Lord Jesus Christ are in any way derogated from, and not rather that the truth of our faith, and the glory in fine of God and of Jesus Christ are rendered (more) illustrious; let him be anathema.


Have a Blessed Easter everyone!
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More progressive dung. Laying a foundation for the upcoming heresy that will occur when Francis attends the reformation anniversary.  Please Lord save us from these imposters in clerical garb.
This is insane...no, Christianity is not indebted to the Reformation. The Reformation has been leading people away from the one and only Church Jesus Himself founded since its inception.
"Where There Is No Hatred of Heresy, There Is No Holiness"- Fr. Frederick Faber
The Luther quote in context:

Quote:God shows his righteousness and justice by having mercy! This is the great revelation. The apostle says God is “just and justifying,” that is, he is just to himself when he justifies human beings; he is in fact love and mercy, so for that reason he is just to himself—he truly demonstrates who he is—when he has mercy.
But we cannot understand any of this if we do not know exactly what the expression “the righteousness of God” means. There is a danger that people can hear about the righteousness of God but not understand its meaning, so instead of being encouraged they are frightened. St. Augustine had already clearly explained its meaning centuries ago: “The ‘righteousness of God’ is that by which we are made righteous, just as ‘the salvation of God’ [see Ps 3:8] means the salvation by which he saves us.”[2] In other words, the righteousness of God is that by which God makes those who believe in his Son Jesus acceptable to him. It does not enact justice but makes people just
Luther deserves the credit for bringing this truth back when its meaning had been lost over the centuries, at least in Christian preaching, and it is this above all for which Christianity is indebted to the Reformation, whose fifth centenary occurs next year. The reformer later wrote that when he discovered this, “I felt that I was altogether born again and had entered paradise itself through open gates.”[3] But it was neither Augustine nor Luther who explained the concept of “the righteousness of God” this way; Scripture had done that before they did:
When the goodness and loving kindness of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not because of deeds done by us in righteousness, but in virtue of his own mercy” (Titus 3:4-5).
God, who is rich in mercy, out of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead through our own trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved. (see Eph 2:4-5)
Therefore, to say “the righteousness of God has been manifested” is like saying that God’s goodness, his love, his mercy, has been revealed. God’s justice not only does not contradict his mercy but consists precisely in mercy!

Other than the absurdity of saying that Luther and the "reformation" deserves any credit whatsoever, I don't see the problem with that.  Isn't God perfectly Just and perfectly merciful?  Isn't our sanctification through no merit of our own? 

I don't see anywhere in the text of the homily where Father Cantalamessa says that the fear of hell is a sin or that they are justified without Christ or that justification is not reliant on Grace, or that confidence of Grace is sufficient or that Christ is also the legislator or that Catholic teaching on sanctification is wrong.  Am I just missing it?
(03-28-2016, 02:03 PM)dcmaccabees Wrote: [ -> ]The Luther quote in context:

Quote:God shows his righteousness and justice by having mercy! This is the great revelation. The apostle says God is “just and justifying,” that is, he is just to himself when he justifies human beings; he is in fact love and mercy, so for that reason he is just to himself—he truly demonstrates who he is—when he has mercy.
But we cannot understand any of this if we do not know exactly what the expression “the righteousness of God” means. There is a danger that people can hear about the righteousness of God but not understand its meaning, so instead of being encouraged they are frightened. St. Augustine had already clearly explained its meaning centuries ago: “The ‘righteousness of God’ is that by which we are made righteous, just as ‘the salvation of God’ [see Ps 3:8] means the salvation by which he saves us.”[2] In other words, the righteousness of God is that by which God makes those who believe in his Son Jesus acceptable to him. It does not enact justice but makes people just
Luther deserves the credit for bringing this truth back when its meaning had been lost over the centuries, at least in Christian preaching, and it is this above all for which Christianity is indebted to the Reformation, whose fifth centenary occurs next year. The reformer later wrote that when he discovered this, “I felt that I was altogether born again and had entered paradise itself through open gates.”[3] But it was neither Augustine nor Luther who explained the concept of “the righteousness of God” this way; Scripture had done that before they did:
When the goodness and loving kindness of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not because of deeds done by us in righteousness, but in virtue of his own mercy” (Titus 3:4-5).
God, who is rich in mercy, out of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead through our own trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved. (see Eph 2:4-5)
Therefore, to say “the righteousness of God has been manifested” is like saying that God’s goodness, his love, his mercy, has been revealed. God’s justice not only does not contradict his mercy but consists precisely in mercy!

Other than the absurdity of saying that Luther and the "reformation" deserves any credit whatsoever, I don't see the problem with that.  Isn't God perfectly Just and perfectly merciful?  Isn't our sanctification through no merit of our own? 

I don't see anywhere in the text of the homily where Father Cantalamessa says that the fear of hell is a sin or that they are justified without Christ or that justification is not reliant on Grace, or that confidence of Grace is sufficient or that Christ is also the legislator or that Catholic teaching on sanctification is wrong.  Am I just missing it?

I also don't see much objection in the homily itself--even early on he recognizes that there'll be a time of punishment, of wrath and fury. We live in the time of mercy, though--not only this year, but the whole saeculum, the time of the Church. And if indeed mercy is the antidote to vengeance, there'll be a time of vengeance, because God said « vengeance is mine. »

But I have to agree with Dmorgan. That slipping of Luther and saying « Christianity » is indebted to his revolt is too much of a paving of the way to the concelebration with lutherans et al. This is absolutely wrong and scandalous and unacceptable.  But then again, the pope have done worse things, I suppose, and after Lutherans received communion in St. Peter's Basilica this is nothing.

Also, I don't get it when he says « But beauty, as we know very well, can also lead to ruin. » What ? We all know that ?
I guess one can look at the reformation as triggering the counter-reformation and Trent. However, to lose a huge portion of Europe to Protestantism which in effect was the seed which grew into what our modern world has become was definitely not a positive trade off.  Protestantism has been nothing but a plague on the world and has probably accounted for countless lost souls.
(03-28-2016, 02:37 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote: [ -> ]But I have to agree with Dmorgan. That slipping of Luther and saying « Christianity » is indebted to his revolt is too much of a paving of the way to the concelebration with lutherans et al. This is absolutely wrong and scandalous and unacceptable.  But then again, the pope have done worse things, I suppose, and after Lutherans received communion in St. Peter's Basilica this is nothing.

Agreed. That particular sentiment is disgusting and it pervades far, far too much of the Vatican today.  While I don't see the Vatican actually allowing concelibration with Lutherans, I can see the Vatican issuing an ill-advised sop around the anniversary for something like a Lutheran version of the Anglican Use parishes.