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Full Version: Cardinal Muller on "who am I to judge," celebrating the Reformation, etc.
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I know some complained when he was put in charge of the CDF as there were some questionable things in the past, but he seems to take his job seriously IMO.  This is an excerpt from a longer interview where he speaks of certain hot-button issues where doubt has been sown in recent times: "who am I to judge," who can receive Communion, Protestantization of the Church, women's ordination, and celibacy.

http://chiesa.espresso.repubblica.it/art...refresh_ce

And some excerpts of the excerpt:

Beginning with the French Revolution, the subsequent liberal regimes and the totalitarian systems of the 20th century, the objective of the principal attacks has always been the Christian vision of human existence and of its destiny.

When its resistance could not be overcome, some of its elements were allowed to remain, but not Christianity in its substance; the result was that Christianity ceased to be the criterion of all reality, and the aforementioned subjectivist positions were encouraged.

These have their origin in a new non-Christian and relativistic anthropology that dispenses with the concept of truth: contemporary man sees himself obliged to live permanently in doubt. More than that: the affirmation that the Church cannot judge personal situations is based on a false soteriology, namely that man is his own savior and redeemer.

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Strictly speaking, we Catholics have no reason to celebrate October 31, 1517, the date that is considered the beginning of the Reformation that would lead to the rupture of Western Christianity.

If we are convinced that divine revelation is preserved whole and unchanged through Scripture and Tradition, in the doctrine of the faith, in the sacraments, in the hierarchical constitution of the Church by divine right, founded on the sacrament of holy orders, we cannot accept that there exist sufficient reasons to separate from the Church.
Lukewarm, but better than nothing considering the times.
What he should have said is strictly speaking, the Church should CONDEMN any celebration of the Reformation just as Trent infallibly condemned the Luther's errors.

Furthermore the Church should uphold the Council's condemnations and anathematize any Catholic who participates in the festivities with the protestants and/or does not speak out against these heresies:

http://www.thecounciloftrent.com/ch6.htm
(03-30-2016, 05:11 PM)Truecharity Wrote: [ -> ]Lukewarm, but better than nothing considering the times.
What he should have said is strictly speaking, the Church should CONDEMN any celebration of the Reformation just as Trent infallibly condemned the Luther's errors.

Furthermore the Church should uphold the Council's condemnations and anathematize any Catholic who participates in the festivities with the protestants and/or does not speak out against these heresies:

http://www.thecounciloftrent.com/ch6.htm

To be fair, the Pope didn't do this in 1917 either--there were not renewals of the Tridentine condemnations or public declarations against Reformation commemorations. 

Celebrating the Reformation as good would certainly be wrong, as Cardinal Muller notes, but as far as I can tell, the Church in 1917 did not have any problem with German Catholics participating in the commemorations of the Reformation in Germany.  Those did have a different character than prior celebrations.  Rather than being antagonistic like past anniversaries, it was mostly focused on removing unnecessary enmities between Catholics and Protestants for the sake of unity and peace in the new German republic.  For example, a joint commission was established made up of Protestants and Catholics who worked to overcome polemical stereotypes and exaggerations about both sides of the Reformation.  At least from what I've read, this is what the Church foresees the upcoming one to be like.  But we shall see!
(03-31-2016, 08:44 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-30-2016, 05:11 PM)Truecharity Wrote: [ -> ]Lukewarm, but better than nothing considering the times.
What he should have said is strictly speaking, the Church should CONDEMN any celebration of the Reformation just as Trent infallibly condemned the Luther's errors.

Furthermore the Church should uphold the Council's condemnations and anathematize any Catholic who participates in the festivities with the protestants and/or does not speak out against these heresies:

http://www.thecounciloftrent.com/ch6.htm

To be fair, the Pope didn't do this in 1917 either--there were not renewals of the Tridentine condemnations or public declarations against Reformation commemorations. 

Celebrating the Reformation as good would certainly be wrong, as Cardinal Muller notes, but as far as I can tell, the Church in 1917 did not have any problem with German Catholics participating in the commemorations of the Reformation in Germany.  Those did have a different character than prior celebrations.  Rather than being antagonistic like past anniversaries, it was mostly focused on removing unnecessary enmities between Catholics and Protestants for the sake of unity and peace in the new German republic.  For example, a joint commission was established made up of Protestants and Catholics who worked to overcome polemical stereotypes and exaggerations about both sides of the Reformation.  At least from what I've read, this is what the Church foresees the upcoming one to be like.  But we shall see!

If memory serves, they were in a midst of World War I. What Commemorations of the reformation did German Catholics participate in 1917?

Pope Benedict XV did not call out condemnations of the Reformation in 1917 because it went beyond question. It was a given that Catholics prelates didn't publicly celebrate the commemoration of the Reformation...

Peruse Humani generis redemptionem.
Notice how the vast majority of encyclicals and documents by Benedict XV revolved in essence, around the war.

If you are refering to the "Malines Conversations":
The conversations were held in the Belgian primatial see of Malines (now normally referred to as Mechelen) from 1921 to 1927, largely on the initiative of Cardinal Mercier, but with tacit support from the Vatican and the Archbishops of Canterbury and York Randall Davidson and Cosmo Gordon Lang. 
Cardinal Bourne, Archbishop of Westminster, successfully urged the Vatican to withdraw its encouragement, in line with Leo XIII's bull Apostolicae curae (1896), which had denied validity to Anglican orders.

But this is a complete departure from your implication that "Church in 1917 did not have any problem with German Catholics participating in the commemorations of the Reformation in Germany". There were no such JOINT heretical commemorations.
Tergiversating history in order to fit the agenda of joint reformation celebration does not help this subject.