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Am wondering if Catholics are permitted to keep statues of pagan gods/goddesses in their rooms if only for decoration?

My dilemma is that long ago I was a "lapsed" pagan who kept Egyptian and Greek deity statues primarily as decoration, but never really for worship. Since I have returned to the Catholic faith I'm not sure if keeping them is a good idea for me-even though I see their historical+aesthetic values and appreciation for classical mythology.

I am thinking I should dispose of them. Smashing statues might be extreme but I don't see the point of burying them (not like I have space to bury them anyway) or selling them on ebay, especially if they are going to be used for "worship" purposes? I realize that pagan statues can be dangerous and demonic; I am not sure if it's best to keep these statues (even for aesthetic reasons; and believe me, I appreciate classical statuary) in interest of my spiritual safety.

Thoughts?
Since you're not showing them any homage and are keeping them for artistic purposes only, I don't see a problem with it. Granted, I'd suggest not putting it as the focal point of the room, and of course have the home blessed.
Break them to pieces and put them out with the trash. You should know this is the proper thing to do.
(04-10-2016, 10:51 PM)shin Wrote: [ -> ]Break them to pieces and put them out with the trash. You should know this is the proper thing to do.

Yes, because that's why the Church has done with all the art from ancient times, so none of the museums throughout Europe have any of it anymore.
Very good point Paul.
While we should be cautious with these things, I think its fine for secular purposes.
(04-10-2016, 10:51 PM)shin Wrote: [ -> ]Break them to pieces and put them out with the trash. You should know this is the proper thing to do.

We're not Muslims. We don't go around destroying art.
'Then at last I baptize them in due form, and I give to each his name written on a ticket. After their baptism the new Christians go back to their houses and bring me their wives and families for baptism. When all are baptized I order all the temples of their false gods to be destroyed and all the idols to be broken in pieces. I can give you no idea of the joy I feel in seeing this done, witnessing the destruction of the idols by the very people who but lately adored them.'

St. Francis Xavier
(04-12-2016, 03:14 AM)shin Wrote: [ -> ]'Then at last I baptize them in due form, and I give to each his name written on a ticket. After their baptism the new Christians go back to their houses and bring me their wives and families for baptism. When all are baptized I order all the temples of their false gods to be destroyed and all the idols to be broken in pieces. I can give you no idea of the joy I feel in seeing this done, witnessing the destruction of the idols by the very people who but lately adored them.'

St. Francis Xavier

Completely different situation. I think the danger of someone worshipping Zeus is pretty low; Sequentia even mentioned that when he was a pagan, he didn't worship the statues. St. Francis Xavier is talking about converts from an entire culture of idol worshippers - he didn't go smashing pagan statuary in Europe.
(04-12-2016, 12:15 AM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-10-2016, 10:51 PM)shin Wrote: [ -> ]Break them to pieces and put them out with the trash. You should know this is the proper thing to do.

We're not Muslims. We don't go around destroying art.

Thank God for that.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but weren't some of the pagan Roman temples studied by architects to build some of the churches in Europe?  I believe the Pantheon was studied to figure how to build the domes for Saint Peter's and the Duomo in Florence.  And a lot of the Catholic Rennaissance art was inspired by studying classical sculptures.
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