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I was just looking over the ole FE site and re-read two articles that I didn't write. Thought I'd share in case anyone missed them or would benefit from re-reading them. They're about the beauty of Sunday, the Lord's Day. Reading these makes me so sad for "what could be," what should be. Imagine living in a beautiful Bavarian village, or an Irish one, or an English one before the "Reformation." Imagine the sounds of church bells, and knowing that everyone is "on the same page" with regard to liturgical time. Imagine Sunday as it could and should be, honored with reverence, filled with beauty, family, and friendship -- and food prepared the day before. Special foods. And if you're the one cooking those foods, you're not doing it alone; you have extended family helping you, and neighbors around you doing the same thing. After Mass come receiving visitors and bringing out your prettiest china for the occasion. Everything stops but for worshiping the Lord, feeling gratitude, and enjoying the "real things" in life...


No worries about how the Muslim "refugees" (the vast majority of whom being fighting-age lone males) feel about a Christian village honoring Christ on the Lord's Day (just as Muslim holidays are celebrated in Muslim lands). No bending over backwards to appease Jews who claim to feel oppressed because Christian holidays instead of Jewish ones are celebrated in a Christian land (just as Jewish holidays and not Christian ones are celebrated in Israel). Just a people, living life as a community -- a community that includes their ancestors and the traditions they gave them -- tradition, "the democracy of the dead," as Chesterton called it. Catholics living as Catholics without apology, with no one calling us evil or reminding us to "check our privilege" as we do so (as contrasted with what Jesuits are doing to their own people now as seen in this thread). Just peace and life. As homogeneous as the down-on-immigration Japanese who, "miraculously" are allowed to simply be Japanese and preserve their culture (if they all converted to Christianity tomorrow, they'd be called "racists" by the end of the week and we'd never hear the end of it).

Seriously, wouldn't it be sooooo nice to be able to just relax and be Catholic and not be alone in it or mocked for it?
(04-14-2016, 02:38 AM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: [ -> ]I was just looking over the ole FE site and re-read two articles that I didn't write. Thought I'd share in case anyone missed them or would benefit from re-reading them. They're about the beauty of Sunday, the Lord's Day. Reading these makes me so sad for "what could be," what should be. Imagine living in a beautiful Bavarian village, or an Irish one, or an English one before the "Reformation." Imagine the sounds of church bells, and knowing that everyone is "on the same page" with regard to liturgical time. Imagine Sunday as it could and should be, honored with reverence, filled with beauty, family, and friendship -- and food prepared the day before. Special foods. And if you're the one cooking those foods, you're not doing it alone; you have extended family helping you, and neighbors around you doing the same thing. After Mass come receiving visitors and bringing out your prettiest china for the occasion. Everything stops but for worshiping the Lord, feeling gratitude, and enjoying the "real things" in life...


No worries about how the Muslim "refugees" (the vast majority of whom being fighting-age lone males) feel about a Christian village honoring Christ on the Lord's Day (just as Muslim holidays are celebrated in Muslim lands). No bending over backwards to appease Jews who claim to feel oppressed because Christian holidays instead of Jewish ones are celebrated in a Christian land (just as Jewish holidays and not Christian ones are celebrated in Israel). Just a people, living life as a community -- a community that includes their ancestors and the traditions they gave them -- tradition, "the democracy of the dead," as Chesterton called it. Catholics living as Catholics without apology, with no one calling us evil or reminding us to "check our privilege" as we do so (as contrasted with what Jesuits are doing to their own people now as seen in this thread). Just peace and life. As homogeneous as the down-on-immigration Japanese who, "miraculously" are allowed to simply be Japanese and preserve their culture (if they all converted to Christianity tomorrow, they'd be called "racists" by the end of the week and we'd never hear the end of it).

Seriously, wouldn't it be sooooo nice to be able to just relax and be Catholic and not be alone in it or mocked for it?

All the men and ladies dressed nicely and moderate. Wonderful grass fields rolling away on hills as the sun shines down on a wonderful, non-industrial community. 

Ahhh Vox, that would indeed be a wonderful place. Maybe one day. Indeed in heaven.

[Image: 9adf6d1451592a9c8ffca46f7f4369de.jpg]
I have a dear friend who manages to have such restful Sundays in her house.  She has 11 children ages 17 to bun in the oven.  But when we go to her home, Sundays are beautiful and lovely.  I don't know how she does it.  My routines mustn't be good enough because I struggle to get basics done each week and don't know how to get caught up enough for a truly special and restful Sunday.  She has 11; I have 4.  I should be able to do this right?

Laetare Sunday was a wonderful time.  We took both families to a park for a picnic: prosciutto, melon, fresh bread, other meats, salad, berries . . .  And then the plan had been "Laetare sundaes" for dessert.  Only the weather suddenly turned cold, so my friend invited us to her house.  My jaw hit the floor: beautiful table cloths, fresh flowers, and 11 kids.  I had managed breakfast on placemats, quickly thrown together.  That's it.  There were no flowers, no table cloth, nothing special to mark the day.  It was a lesson in how I fall short in terms of planning. 

How do you find the time to do it?!?!? 
All shops are closed on Sundays in (most of) Europe. It is nice. There's nothing particularly religious about it, but the peaceful atmosphere helps . Interestingly, it's protected by many workers' unions, that work remain illegal on Sunday without special permit. When enough get used to it and want it, it can happen. But with the 24/7 mentality of the USA it would be very difficult to get this idea through to people...not mention the whole Protestant 'work as worship' mentality, and the idolatry of money that follows. Ironically this idea cold probably get off the ground more easily with the Bernie Sanders crowd.
(04-14-2016, 09:40 AM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]I have a dear friend who manages to have such restful Sundays in her house.  She has 11 children ages 17 to bun in the oven.  But when we go to her home, Sundays are beautiful and lovely.  I don't know how she does it.  My routines mustn't be good enough because I struggle to get basics done each week and don't know how to get caught up enough for a truly special and restful Sunday.  She has 11; I have 4.  I should be able to do this right?

Laetare Sunday was a wonderful time.  We took both families to a park for a picnic: prosciutto, melon, fresh bread, other meats, salad, berries . . .  And then the plan had been "Laetare sundaes" for dessert.  Only the weather suddenly turned cold, so my friend invited us to her house.  My jaw hit the floor: beautiful table cloths, fresh flowers, and 11 kids.  I had managed breakfast on placemats, quickly thrown together.  That's it.  There were no flowers, no table cloth, nothing special to mark the day.  It was a lesson in how I fall short in terms of planning. 

How do you find the time to do it?!?!?

LOL Poor Fontevrault! I can relate, I assure you. Don't kick yourself, though! It could well be that things are frantic "behind the scenes". Or maybe she's just one of "those women" who manage to pull everything together homemaking-wise, seemingly all the time because she's just especially gifted at it. There are just some people who have a gift for things like always having the perfect tablecloth for the occasion, being able to bake from new recipes they'd never tried before and having it all come out perfectly. They're the Mom Blog people with the always-photogenic homes, always busy at crafts -- but with no stress and, seemingly, nothing to clean up. They'll have perfect Christmas table centerpieces with glitter and what not -- but not one stray bit of glitter on the floor to show for it. They're blessed. Or talented. Or both. Or something.

My Aunt Teresa, R.I.P., on the Italian side of the family (my Pop's sister) always had such a calm, peaceful way about her. My daughter and I used to love to visit her and just watch her as she went about doing something as simple as making a cup of tea. I think the kids would say "she's so Zen!" And she was. It wasn't a put-on; it was just Aunt Teresa being. Puttering. Her puttering was poetry. I picture some of the Blog Moms as having that sort of demeanor, always peacefully going about their days, doing everything right, never a hair out of place, with always magnificent results -- and without ever getting exhausted (and I picture other of the Blog Moms as putting on a show, maybe being raging control freaks who take great pictures, in it for the admiration and secret thrill of making other women jealous, and most anxious to get advertising money and free things they can review for a price LOL)

Wish I were like all "Zen" like Aunt Theresa. But I'm definitely not LOL  And as to you:  maybe you're not the Blog Mom type, but that doesn't mean you don't give your children, husband, and the world equally important -- or more important -- gifts and services than the Mom Blog women do.  A woman who, say, spends all day making a great Jesse Tree can't have spent that same day writing a novel, working to cure cancer, making a great painting, teaching her kid how to read, or helping the sick, elderly woman who lives next door, ya know? A great homemaker's efforts are a wonder -- and joy -- to behold, but that ability is just one gift of many, and I'm sure God's given you a slew of great gifts. And I'd bet that if I ever had the happiness of meeting you and you were to invite me to your home, I'd feel a lot cozier in your kitchen than in a Mom Blogger's spotless showpiece, no matter how much I might admire the visuals of the Mom Blogger's place. Yours would likely feel more like home Smile  And I wouldn't be terrified of spilling coffee onto a floor I could eat off of LOL

That said, if being a great homemaker is something you truly want to be, maybe asking your friend the question you asked here can help: "How do you find the time do it?!" Maybe she can teach you! Me, I think organization is key when it comes to that sort of thing -- having a system, having things in their place and making sure they stay there when not in use (when I had a kitchen, I had my spices in alphabetical order LOL), having a vision of how you want things to be and arranging things so it's more easily accomplished, cleaning as you go along (that's the one thing I am good at. I hate it when dishes pile up when I'm cooking. Arrrgh!), keeping an eye on the calendar for what's coming up soon so you'll have everything you need when it's time to get busy, spreading the work out over days rather than waiting til the last minute (e.g., Thanksgiving's coming, so maybe making X, Y, and Z over three days and freezing them so all you have to do on the big day is bake a turkey), etc. Those are skills you can learn, and it sounds as if you have a friend who can teach you, so go for it!
Oh Vox, you'd be welcome in my home anytime!  I think we'd have some nice chats over a pot of tea. 

I did ask her how she does it and she replied that she was lying down for a nap at the moment and that the older girls help a lot.  I had the privilege of babysitting her brood for 4 days and I will say that she has them **trained to perfection.**  The eldest son was 13 and spent most of his extra time visiting with me in the kitchen, helping make meals, and baking cookies and making homemade granola.  That was a son.  The daughters were equally lovely.  On Saturday morning, they all cleaned the house until it sparkled and I had nothing to do.  I've never seen anything like it.  I consider myself accomplished if I manage all laundry caught up, outfits ironed and ready for mass, and a reasonable breakfast. 

In terms of time and gifts to my family, I thank you for the pep talk.  I am so tired right now what with being in the early stages of pregnancy and 5 hours of sleep last night.  It's easy to forget that those mommy bloggers probably don't do some/many of the things I have to in a day. 
(04-15-2016, 09:08 AM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]Oh Vox, you'd be welcome in my home anytime!  I think we'd have some nice chats over a pot of tea. 

And cookies? Or cake? Or cookies AND cake? Sticking tongue out at you

(04-15-2016, 09:08 AM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]I did ask her how she does it and she replied that she was lying down for a nap at the moment and that the older girls help a lot.

Ahhhhhhh! So her secret is that she raised some nice kids who do a lot of the homemaking with/for her! Good on her!

(04-15-2016, 09:08 AM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]I had the privilege of babysitting her brood for 4 days and I will say that she has them **trained to perfection.**  The eldest son was 13 and spent most of his extra time visiting with me in the kitchen, helping make meals, and baking cookies and making homemade granola.  That was a son.  The daughters were equally lovely.  On Saturday morning, they all cleaned the house until it sparkled and I had nothing to do.  I've never seen anything like it.  I consider myself accomplished if I manage all laundry caught up, outfits ironed and ready for mass, and a reasonable breakfast. 

Wow! Sounds as if it isn't homemaking in se that's her great gift, but raising decent kids! That's a parent whose advice I'd listen to!

(04-15-2016, 09:08 AM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]In terms of time and gifts to my family, I thank you for the pep talk.  I am so tired right now what with being in the early stages of pregnancy and 5 hours of sleep last night.  It's easy to forget that those mommy bloggers probably don't do some/many of the things I have to in a day.

sad  Everything I wrote gets multiplied by a thousand when you're pregnant! In your state, you should put homemaking "competition" (for lack of my ability to think of a better word right now) out in the garage! Put your feet up and take a loooooooong nap, preferably with a kitty!
Vox,  cookies (fresh baked - even a pregnant lady can handle that) and cake- any time you like.  Smile  But only if you will ignore the dog hair on the rug in the family room and the clutter of homeschooling papers nearby.  I try so hard to keep up . . .

I would listen to my friend on matters of parenting any day of the week.  She and her husband are amazingly patient, loving, great parents.  I only hope my kids turn out as well and that I can absorb some of her patience.  Some days it is so hard!

I wish I could take a nap!  I've finished up my grading for the week.  But my kids are refusing to do lessons because they would rather play.  They are exiled to their rooms until their father gets home and I have to do the taxes before Monday.  If only there were about 12 more hours in the day, I would actually complete my projects.

I'd say "I'll take a nap for you!" -- but I don't think that'd help. (You're probably thinking, "T'heck with that! Do my taxes and grading for me instead -- while I sleep for four days!" LOL)

Wish I could wave a wand and at least halve your work load and have you lounging on the sands, touring beautiful landscapes, and eating at the finest restaurants in ---  bee-yoooooo-tee-ful Hawaii!!! where you'll be staying at the fabulous Essex Hotel, a friend of the FishEaters Show! Sigh...

Anyway, whenever I get to visit you someday, I'll not only ignore any dog hair, I'll insist the dog come sit on me! I love me some scoobs!

Hey, I finished the taxes already and am now getting ready to sit down to tea with my children.    Smile
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