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This is most decidedly NOT GOOD!!

I have been following the development of this phenomena since it first emerged in India. It appears it has finally come here.

Bad News!

Quote:https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-y...d-the-u-s/

The superbug that doctors have been dreading just reached the U.S.
https://www.facebook.com/lena.sun.90

[Image: 2013-09-16T210838Z_01_TOR115_RTRIDSP_3_H...jpg&w=1484]
CRE, a family of bacteria pictured, is considered one of the deadliest superbugs because it causes infections that are often resistant to most antibiotics. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Reuters)

For the first time, researchers have found a person in the United States carrying bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort, an alarming development that the top U.S. public health official says could mean "the end of the road" for antibiotics.

The antibiotic-resistant strain was found last month in the urine of a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman. Defense Department researchers determined that she carried a strain of E. coli resistant to the antibiotic colistin, according to a study published Thursday in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. The authors wrote that the discovery "heralds the emergence of a truly pan-drug resistant bacteria."

Superbug known as ‘phantom menace’ on the rise in U.S

Colistin is the antibiotic of last resort for particularly dangerous types of superbugs, including a family of bacteria known as CRE, which health officials have dubbed "nightmare bacteria." In some instances, these superbugs kill up to 50 percent of patients who become infected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called CRE among the country's most urgent public health threats.

In this Nov. 2015 video, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Dr. Thomas Frieden said that the CDC is committed to fighting antibiotic resistance. (YouTube/CDC)

It's the first time this colistin-resistant strain has been found in a person in the United States. In November, public health officials worldwide reacted with alarm when Chinese and British researchers reported finding the colistin-resistant strain in pigs, raw pork meat and in a small number of people in China. The deadly strain was later discovered in Europe and elsewhere.

“It basically shows us that the end of the road isn’t very far away for antibiotics — that we may be in a situation where we have patients in our intensive-care units, or patients getting urinary tract infections for which we do not have antibiotics,” CDC Director Tom Frieden said in an interview Thursday.

[1 in 3 antibiotics prescribed in U.S. are unnecessary]

“I’ve been there for TB patients. I’ve cared for patients for whom there are no drugs left. It is a feeling of such horror and helplessness,” Frieden added. “This is not where we need to be.”

CDC officials are working with Pennsylvania health authorities to interview the patient and family to identify how she may have contracted the bacteria, including reviewing recent hospitalizations and other health-care exposures. CDC hopes to screen the patient and her contacts to see if others might be carrying the organism. Local and state health departments also will be collecting cultures as part of the investigation.

Thursday’s study did not disclose further details about the Pennsylvania woman or the outcome of her case. The authors could not be reached for comment. A spokesman at the Pennsylvania Department of Health was not immediately available to comment on the case.

Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr. (D-Pa.) said he is concerned about the reports. In a statement, Casey said he supported legislation for and participated in hearings about antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which he said "present an urgent public health problem that we must focus on intensively."

[Feds ramp up efforts to deal with antibiotic resistance]

He said he planned to get a full briefing on the case in the coming days.

Scientists and public health officials have long warned that if the resistant bacteria continue to spread, treatment options could be seriously limited. Routine operations could become deadly. Minor infections could become life-threatening crises. Pneumonia could be more and more difficult to treat.

Already, doctors had been forced to rely on colistin as a last-line defense against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The drug is hardly ideal. It is more than half a century old and can seriously damage a patient’s kidneys. And yet, because doctors have run out of weapons to fight a growing number of infections that evade more modern antibiotics, it has become a critical tool in fighting off some of the most tenacious infections.

Bacteria develop antibiotic resistance in two ways. Many acquire mutations in their own genomes that allow them to withstand antibiotics, although that ability can't be shared with pathogens outside their own family.

Other bacteria rely on a shortcut: They get infected with something called a plasmid, a small piece of DNA, carrying a gene for antibiotic resistance. That makes resistance genes more dangerous because plasmids can make copies of themselves and transfer the genes they carry to other bugs within the same family as well as jump to other families of bacteria, which can then "catch" the resistance directly without having to develop it through evolution.

The colistin-resistant E. coli found in the Pennsylvania woman has this type of resistance gene.

Public health officials say they have expecting this resistance gene to turn up in the United States.

"This is definitely alarming," said David Hyun, a senior officer leading an antibiotic-resistance project at the Pew Charitable Trust. "The fact that we found it in the United States confirms our suspicions and adds urgency to actions we need to work on antibiotic stewardship and surveillance for this type of resistance."


This animated video from 2013 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention highlights the key points and graphics of the "Antibiotic Threats in the United States" report. (YouTube/CDC)

Late last year, as part of a broader budget deal, Congress agreed to give hundreds of millions of dollars to the federal agencies engaged in the battle against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

The largest chunk of that money, more than $150 million, was slated to go to the CDC as part of an effort to build and strengthen capacity at state and local health departments to prevent and monitor superbug outbreaks.

Other funding went to the National Institutes of Health for research on combating antimicrobial resistance, as well as to an agency known as BARDA, which works on national preparedness for chemical and biological threats, including developing new therapies.
What I don't get is that the CNN report of yesterday just says she "was treated and released"
So what happens to her now and the people she comes in contact with?

http://edition.cnn.com/2016/05/26/health...ase-in-us/

C.
This is serious stuff.  Infections that were once eradicated like Tuberculosis, diphtheria, and Pertussis are starting to become more and more regular... Europe has a gonorrhea and syphyllis superbug issue also.  But when you think about the impact of antibiotics in the workplace, where cuts and wounds can become a death sentence, or food poisoning, or the risk of staph infections during trips to the hospital or simple medical procedures. It's a game changer. 
(05-27-2016, 09:30 PM)Cetil Wrote: [ -> ]What I don't get is that the CNN report of yesterday just says she "was treated and released"
So what happens to her now and the people she comes in contact with?

http://edition.cnn.com/2016/05/26/health...ase-in-us/

C.

They has no choice. They can isolate a patient and hope the is no cross contamination, no 'nosocomial' infection outbreak at the hospital. But if it does start it would be potentially catastrophic for that institution.

My wife was a TB caseworker. She had a number of MultiDrug Resistant (MDR) TB patient cases. CDC and state agencies tracked them, back then. (I'm not so sure about now, their numbers have recently skyrocketed.) The only thing that could be done for them was to let them loose in the society and watch them closely, where they traveled and where they stayed. There was some amount of monitoring of whom they associated with, but they simply could not deny them their right to freedom of association or movement.
This phenomena could become worse, because there is a trait that bacteria can assimilate from other species of bacteria, making them resistant to all antibiotics, not just a species to species transfer, like in S. Aureus or C. Difficile or E Choli, et al, acquired over time.

Spooky and deadly stuff this.
Scary stuff indeed.


Quote:Europe has a gonorrhea and syphyllis superbug issue also.

No surprise there. Not to sound too smug, but rampant promiscuity is going to have repercussions.
I wonder if they will try that medieval "antibiotic" treatment that was in the news a year or more ago - red wine, garlic, and onion were in it.  I seem to recall that researchers found it effective even against drug-resistant bacteria.  Wouldn't it be a riot if it worked???
(05-29-2016, 04:12 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]I wonder if they will try that medieval "antibiotic" treatment that was in the news a year or more ago - red wine, garlic, and onion were in it.  I seem to recall that researchers found it effective even against drug-resistant bacteria.  Wouldn't it be a riot if it worked???

Yes I recall the post too. Problem is, it was a 'topical' application that was effective and most severe infections are systemic or blood borne. So, sadly, its use is rather limited.
(05-30-2016, 09:31 AM)Zedta Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-29-2016, 04:12 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]I wonder if they will try that medieval "antibiotic" treatment that was in the news a year or more ago - red wine, garlic, and onion were in it.  I seem to recall that researchers found it effective even against drug-resistant bacteria.  Wouldn't it be a riot if it worked???

Yes I recall the post too. Problem is, it was a 'topical' application that was effective and most severe infections are systemic or blood borne. So, sadly, its use is rather limited.

I didn't remember that . . .  Thanks for reminding me.  :)

I wonder if there are applications that can work.  If they can isolate the compounds that are most effective perhaps they can do something with it . . .  It might be one avenue to consider. 
(05-30-2016, 09:38 AM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-30-2016, 09:31 AM)Zedta Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-29-2016, 04:12 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]I wonder if they will try that medieval "antibiotic" treatment that was in the news a year or more ago - red wine, garlic, and onion were in it.  I seem to recall that researchers found it effective even against drug-resistant bacteria.  Wouldn't it be a riot if it worked???

Yes I recall the post too. Problem is, it was a 'topical' application that was effective and most severe infections are systemic or blood borne. So, sadly, its use is rather limited.

I didn't remember that . . .  Thanks for reminding me.  :)

I wonder if there are applications that can work.  If they can isolate the compounds that are most effective perhaps they can do something with it . . .  It might be one avenue to consider.

I don't mean to have such a jaundiced eye, but my issues are well thought out and come from experience. That being said, I doubt that the pharmaceutical companies have any labs working on something that could be easily made and without huge R&D costs to boost the cost of the new drug. It has to be very heavily contrived and with components costing large amounts to produce. Those sorts of drugs get priority over the simple and not so expensive. If the simple one worked and they see how it could be made more expensive, they'll head that route, but the harder more costly route will get first tries.

'Natural' cures or therapies are like the UFOs of the drug industry. They are maligned and dissed into obscurity, but more often than not, without proper study of the "natural" substances, unless they can be 'Pharmaceutically' derived at increased costs. Then of course, it must be Patent worthy. Its ALL about $ and very less altruistic, if at all.
Zedta, that is unfortunately true.  I wish it weren't.
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