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After my last topic this may seem like a strange twist, but i have been thinking about studying theology, just so that i can know and understand my faith!
This will not be to persue a career or something in theology, as i already have a fulltime job, but i want to study it for myself.
There is only one problem: i worry that most of the classes will be based on Vatican II and that therefore i might learn erroneous things.
Should i go study it anyway or is the danger too great that i will be taught heretical things? Obviously i will discuss this with my priest as well,
but i was wondering what you guys think!
(06-07-2016, 03:58 PM)Ayla Wrote: [ -> ]After my last topic this may seem like a strange twist, but i have been thinking about studying theology, just so that i can know and understand my faith!  This will not be to persue a career or something in theology, as i already have a fulltime job, but i want to study it for myself.  There is only one problem: i worry that most of the classes will be based on Vatican II and that therefore i might learn erroneous things.  Should i go study it anyway or is the danger too great that i will be taught heretical things? Obviously i will discuss this with my priest as well, but i was wondering what you guys think!

Even with the modernism, there seem to be good theologians at times who come through all that.  They aren't world-renowned or anything, but they know their stuff.  They not only learn the Faith, but they learn how to learn the Faith.  That way, they know how to discern whether or not they are being taught good theology and they learn where to go to find good theology.  Sadly, it's hard to find a good program these days, even the ones that are generally recognized as good seem steeped in Ressourcement theology.  With them, it's always JP2 this, JP2 that, Vatican II this, Vatican II that, Hans Urs von Balthasar this, Hans Urs von Balthasar that, Ratzinger this (who they'll still call Ratzinger when they speak of him as a theologian, but John Paul II as John Paul II), Ratzinger that, and the Early Church fathers but only with commentaries and guides by the aforementioned people.  It is as if they see nothing of value between the Early Church Fathers and Ressourcement theology, except for some entertaining stories about medieval saints.
If you are able to download books from archive.org go there and in the search box type Pohle Preuss. Everything is free. When you see what you want, click the title and there will be options on the right regarding format download options. I use an iPad and download them as pdfs. They are excellent and readable. They were published sometime around 1915-1920. What you are looking for are the following volumes.

THE POHLE-PREUSS SERIES OF DOGMATIC TEXTBOOKS

1. God : His Knowability, Essence, and Attributes.

2. The DivineTrinity.

3. God the Author of Nature and the Supernatural.

4. Christology. A Dogmatic Treatise on the Incarnation,.

5. Soteriology. A Dogmatic Treatise on the Redemption.

6. Mariology. A Dogmatic Treatise on the B. V. Mary. With an Appendix on the Worship of the Saints, Relics, and Images.

7. Grace: Actual and Habitual.

8. The Sacraments in General. Baptism. Confirmation.

9. The Holy Eucharist.

10. Penance.

11. Extreme Unction. Holy Orders. Matrimony.

12. Eschatology.
Thank you both for your responses! So is it a fair conclusion if i say that both of you are cautious when it comes to studying theology at a university and that it might be better if i study the faith at home? The university i want to go is acknowledged by the Holy See by the way, but i don't know whether that makes matters better or worse...
(06-08-2016, 04:31 PM)Ayla Wrote: [ -> ]Thank you both for your responses! So is it a fair conclusion if i say that both of you are cautious when it comes to studying theology at a university and that it might be better if i study the faith at home? The university i want to go is acknowledged by the Holy See by the way, but i don't know whether that makes matters better or worse...

Quote:Francis also said that he had wanted the closure of the theological institute within the Franciscans of the Immaculate (STIM), so that the seminarists would study in the pontifical theology faculties of Rome. He then explained that the Church guarantees orthodoxy through the Pope.

I think Rorate captures the reaction of most Catholics when they write concerning the above

Quote:So, how is the orthodoxy of the Friars' formation guaranteed? Well, they can go to Pontifical universities and seminaries, and the simple fact that these seminaries are under the Pope is a "guarantee" of their "orthodoxy"... We can almost see many readers bursting out laughing with this assumption.
Cautious is not the word. I would never study theology at a so-called Catholic university without the express recommendation of a knowledgeable trusted traditional priest. "Acknowledged by the Holy See" is not a seal of approval. The volumes I referenced are very good. I would stick with something like them and steer far clear of the university scholars who have more knowledge than wisdom and are up to their ears in skepticism and higher criticism.
I know a number of seminarians and priests who have gone through the different Pontifical schools in Rome for their theology, and those programs are all relatively fine actually. Some of the seminaries in the US are also fine, but others are not.

If I didn't know these priests (and if I hadn't visited some of these places myself) I wouldn't be able to say anything of course and would probably caution against them since it's better to be safe.

From what I've heard and seen, this is a pretty decent program for learning traditional spiritual theology: http://avila-institute.com/

Spiritual theology touches on many of the important points in dogmatic, moral, and fundamental theology, so that might be an option.

Of course, the safest route would be to read the classic manuals, but one difficulty in here would be having familiarity for some of the technical philosophical terms if you are not already trained in them.
Your approach of seeking out the advice and opinion of trusted priests is right on. I would be cautious still. Regarding the volumes I recommended, they are not difficult to read. I have no training. All my education was secular and I am a convert to the faith. These texts were recommended by a holy brother. They are detailed but not too technical. You should download them. You can't beat the price! Zilch!
THIS:

(06-08-2016, 05:11 PM)deprofundis Wrote: [ -> ]Cautious is not the word. I would never study theology at a so-called Catholic university without the express recommendation of a knowledgeable trusted traditional priest. "Acknowledged by the Holy See" is not a seal of approval.

Someone not versed in Traditional Catholicism is not in a position to discern what is part of the genuine, permanent deposit of faith, and what is modernistic speculation and experimentation.  And therefore the word "cautious" has no bearing.