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I love popcorn and I only eat the stuff I make with my hot air popper. Its kinda like a hairdryer designed to pop corn. No added fats or transfats with this device and it works quickly and is a breeze to clean up. Oh ya, and the popper wasn't expensive. I bought one at T. J. Max for $20. Occasionally, I'll add some melted real butter to the stuff, but just a bit of salt, alone, is also quite nice.

So here's the article, its good stuff!!

:comp:


Quote:http://postnewsd2.blogspot.in/2016/06/is...d-for.html

Wednesday, 8 June 2016

Is your 'healthy' popcorn really good for you?

Many people love eating a bowl of crunchy popcorn. It's been a favorite snack for centuries in America. Anthropologists have actually found popcorn remnants in the American Southwest dating from about 2,500 years ago and in Peru and Mexico as old as 5,000 years.

Sold as "Pearl" corn or "Nonpareil" in the early 1800s, a popcorn "boom" increased its popularity quickly during the Great Depression because it was so inexpensive. It must have caught on, because Americans now eat around 1.2 billion pounds every year!1

If you choose the right variety and cook it properly, popcorn can be relatively nutritious and provides a valuable source of fiber. The ingredients in this healthy snack may even translate to benefits that fight disease.

Popcorn and Your Health

While this article will review some of the beneficial aspects of popcorn it is still relatively high in net carbs and if you are seeking to optimize your mitochondrial health anything more than an ounce or two of popcorn is not a wise choice.

Remember the way to prevent most all chronic degenerative diseases will be to teach your body to burn fat for fuel. It would be FAR better to eat high fiber vegetables for carbs than grains.
Nutritional Aspects of Popcorn

A fairly modest portion of popcorn — 3.5 ounces — offers several important nutrients and impressively high percentages to consumers in terms of recommended daily intake (RDI).
Manganese, for instance, presents 56 percent of the RDI, while magnesium and phosphorus each bring 36 percent.

Zinc is also significant with 21 percent, and copper, vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) and potassium showing up with just under 10 percent each.2 Popcorn contains nutrients and compounds that are associated with:

    Regulated blood sugar
    Improved digestion
    Weight loss
    Reduced cholesterol levels
    Cancer prevention


Another interesting thing about popcorn is that while a 1-cup serving contains 6.2 grams of carbohydrates, which becomes glucose in your body after digestion, the starch is different.
Popcorn retains the endosperm, germ and bran for fiber that sloughs your blood vessel and artery walls of excess cholesterol, helping to optimize cholesterol levels.4Simultaneously, your risk of heart attack, stroke and atherosclerosis — aka hardening of the arteries — is lowered.

For these reasons, your heart doesn't have to work so hard; your blood vessels and arteries allow blood to flow through at the optimum rate rather than slowing down, thickening and causing problems like those mentioned above.

Popcorn Contains Valuable Fiber

That same 3.5-ounce serving of popcorn contains 389 calories and 15 grams offiber.With it you get 78 grams of carbohydrates, 13 grams of protein and 5 grams of fat. Altogether, popcorn is a very substantial food, with physical benefits for every one of those vitamins and minerals.

Fiber is so important that if people ate the amount they should — I recommend consuming about 25 to 50 grams of fiber per 1,000 calories consumed per day — ailments like type 2 diabetes, obesity and heart disease would likely be much less prevalent.

However, most people eat far less than those amounts. According to Authority Nutrition:

  "When the body has ample amounts of fiber, it regulates the release and management of blood sugar and insulin levels better than people with low levels of fiber."7

Popcorn also provides antioxidants, which in turn stave off undesirable features of premature aging such as muscle weakness, osteoporosis, macular degeneration, cognitive decline, dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Even things like wrinkles and age spots may be diminished by this one popcorn component.

Certainly not least, fiber is important because it encourages regularity by stimulating your intestinal muscles and digestive juices, which keeps everything moving through on a regular basis.
The less time food remains in your colon, the better. When it sticks around in your digestive tract for too long, constipation and other problems can occur.

Popcorn and Weight Loss

Because of the fiber, relatively low calories and other factors already discussed, popcorn can help with weight loss.

In fact, one study comparing how full people felt after eating either popcorn or potato chips found that popcorn did a better job of satisfying consumers, which could ultimately lead to fewer consumed calories.However, the caloric intake from eating movie theater popcorn can be staggering:

    "A small bag of popcorn from Harkins Theaters contains 250 calories, 16 grams of fat and 27 grams of carbohydrates. Increase that to a large bag of popcorn, and you'll eat 780 calories, 50 grams of fat and 83 grams of carbs.

    Splurge on the extra-large and your treat clocks in at 1,120 calories, 72 grams of fat and 120 grams of carbs, which is more than one-third the number of carbs you should have for the entire day."


Polyphenols in Popcorn — An Antioxidant Explosion

You've heard of free radicals, which your body produces to help your metabolic processes function better, but when too many are produced, they can turn on you. They can kill off enzymes, multiply and wreak enough havoc in your cells to cause diseases and even alter your DNA.

That's where antioxidants come in, waging war on free radicals provided byantioxidants in the nutrients you consume. Polyphenols in popcorn could be called super antioxidants.
They're important because they can improve your digestion and circulation, and as a result, reduce your cancer risk as well, particularly breast and prostate cancers.

One interesting study conducted by Joe Vinson, Ph.D., from the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania, found that popcorn contains more polyphenols than fruits and vegetables. Polyphenols are more highly concentrated in popcorn than nuts and chocolate, two rivaling snack options.

In fact, his study determined that polyphenol concentrations are much higher in popcorn than previously thought, with more than 15 times the amounts found in whole-grain tortilla chips.

  "Polyphenols are more concentrated in popcorn, which averages only about 4 percent water, while polyphenols are diluted in the 90 percent water that makes up many fruits and vegetables."

Additional research shows that eating popcorn can help regulate blood sugar, lower cholesterol, improve digestion, prevent osteoporosis and protect against cancer.
I use the paper bag trick in the microwave: 1/4 cup popping corn, 1 paper bag, 1 tbsp coconut oil or whatever oil floats your boat (you can use butter if you wish), a little salt.  Put everything in the paper bag, fold to seal (be careful to fold well but leave lots of headroom in the bag), put in microwave on the popcorn setting.  Easy, quick popcorn!  I don't know if you can skip the oil; I figure healthy oils are OK . . .  or at the very least way better than the loads of chemicals in the popcorn bags you get at the grocery store.  :) 
Nice twist on the store bought in the bag popcorn! Coconut oil is best for popcorn. Its what they used to use in the theaters before a group called "Science In The Public Interest", if I remember correctly, started bellyaching about the saturated fats in the oil. Theater popcorn was great, but it wasn't the coconut oil that was so bad. These guys were found to be a front for the processed food industry. Bunch of charlatans. 

Canola oil is the chief offender. When heated to cooking temps, it becomes transfat, about 10 20% by volume does. Canola oil is awful and it is highly genetically altered as well, just to make it nontoxic. Before that the stuff was a failed aircraft engine lubricant oil substitute. It failed because WWII ended and the need for it fell out. Canada had to do something with all the Rape Seed they had, so they genetically modified it to exclude to deadly toxic materials in the oil so people could eat it. The stuff never went under FDA scrutiny either. Just got pushed through, it came from Canada after all. They wouldn't try to poison us!

But, I digress...

Nice technique indeed!
I use olive oil and coconut oil quite a bit for cooking.  I'll use organic, homemade butter sometimes - especially with eggs.  Canola oil is a rare thing in this house.  :)  It makes a nice mayonnaise if you don't have anything else . . .  Then again, I'm talking homemade mayo - not the stuff you buy in the store.
Wow! That makes me glad we don't have Canola oil in the house. I normally use butter, but I may have to try the coconut oil sometime.
We eat popcorn pretty much every day in this house. We burn out hot air poppers about once a year. They seem to only last about 300 sessions or so.
Sir Charles, coconut oil is amazing stuff and the flavor it imparts is just lovely. 

Prairie Mom, just remember the paper bag trick for when your air popper goes down.  It works well - unless you don't close the bag well.  If that happens, you will have popcorn all over the interior of your microwave.  What a mess!
(06-09-2016, 07:26 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]Sir Charles, coconut oil is amazing stuff and the flavor it imparts is just lovely. 

Prairie Mom, just remember the paper bag trick for when your air popper goes down.  It works well - unless you don't close the bag well.  If that happens, you will have popcorn all over the interior of your microwave.  What a mess!

That assumes I can keep paper bags in this house. They always seem to get usurped by short people....
I keep a small stash on a high shelf.  :grin:
Hot air popper vs 2 Tbsp of oil in the bottom of a large pan: is there a difference health-wise? Just curious, as I use the 2d method. Never tried the air popper.

(06-09-2016, 08:37 PM)PrairieMom Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-09-2016, 07:26 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]Sir Charles, coconut oil is amazing stuff and the flavor it imparts is just lovely. 

Prairie Mom, just remember the paper bag trick for when your air popper goes down.  It works well - unless you don't close the bag well.  If that happens, you will have popcorn all over the interior of your microwave.  What a mess!

That assumes I can keep paper bags in this house. They always seem to get usurped by short people....

I thought there was a proper term for them; leprechauns or something.
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