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I have a question about intentions for prayer. Does anybody have any advice about the most proper and pleasing way to Christ to bring our petitions and intentions to him in prayer. Here is my scenario:

1. I have many, and ever growing, numbers of petitions and intentions for myself and for others that I want to bring to Christ in prayer (say my Rosary, for instance).

2. I tend to, because it makes me more fervent, try to say them mentally to Our Lord and Lady.

3. With so many intentions and petitions, it gets very lengthy; but I never want to leave any of them out when I'm saying my Rosary.

With those things in mind, I am curious how the Church has instructed us on how to manage lots of petitions.
" Save , O Lord, and have mecy on thy servant___" or "Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, Have Mercy on Thy Servant ___"

Those are two suggestions I have from the Slav and Byzantine tradition.

Another suggestion is to try not to worry too much. Set your intentions the best you can and leave the rest to God.
Total Consecration/Devotion to Mary (Montfortian)
and by spiritual contracts.
I don't know if this answers your question but this is from a soul in Purgatory;

Why is it that I pray for you with less fervor than I pray for others and that often I forget to recommend you?

Do not trouble yourself about that. It is a punishment for me. Even if you prayed more I should not be any the more relieved. God wills it thus. If He wants you to pray more He will inspire you to do so. I repeat again, do not be worried about me. You will never see me in my sufferings. Later on, when your soul is stronger, you will see souls in Purgatory and very awful ones, but let this not frighten you. God will then give you the necessary courage and all that you need to accomplish His holy will.

http://www.purgatory.ca/treasury-manuscript.php
(08-28-2016, 08:13 PM)Sivvy Wrote: [ -> ]I have a question about intentions for prayer. Does anybody have any advice about the most proper and pleasing way to Christ to bring our petitions and intentions to him in prayer. Here is my scenario:

1. I have many, and ever growing, numbers of petitions and intentions for myself and for others that I want to bring to Christ in prayer (say my Rosary, for instance).

2. I tend to, because it makes me more fervent, try to say them mentally to Our Lord and Lady.

3. With so many intentions and petitions, it gets very lengthy; but I never want to leave any of them out when I'm saying my Rosary.

With those things in mind, I am curious how the Church has instructed us on how to manage lots of petitions.

Write them down. Get them out of your head and onto paper so you don't have to worry about them. Then, when you pray your Rosary, offer it for those intentions, reading them off. List as your final intention "Any intention I may have inadvertently left off this list." God's not stupid; He'll know what you're praying for. Then get on with the Rosary and think no more about them until it's Rosary time again. Don't turn prayer into a time to worry and panic; that's not what it's supposed to be.
(08-30-2016, 12:50 AM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: [ -> ]Write them down. Get them out of your head and onto paper so you don't have to worry about them. Then, when you pray your Rosary, offer it for those intentions, reading them off. List as your final intention "Any intention I may have inadvertently left off this list." God's not stupid; He'll know what you're praying for. Then get on with the Rosary and think no more about them until it's Rosary time again. Don't turn prayer into a time to worry and panic; that's not what it's supposed to be.

That's similar to what the Church instructs priests to do with Mass Intentions.

When a priest receives a request for a Mass he writes it in his Mass Intention schedule with the amount that was offered for the Mass. It is best that he look at the book before saying Mass each day, but he can offer the Mass "for the intention listed in the book for today" if he has forgotten to look. One needs only to specify the intention sufficiently, so it's not just a confused idea. He only is able to keep the money after he says the Mass for the intention with the conditions agreed to. Most priests also leave enough money in the envelope so that should they die, another priest can take up the unsaid Masses and offer at least several more just in case some were forgotten or incorrectly said.

(On a side note, please do offer Mass intentions to priests. That is how many priests can afford to live day to day. Please, however, only personally give a priest the intentions and never just leave an envelope. A Mass Intention is a contract and a priest may not be clear on what you want, may not be able to fulfill the conditions you want, or may be too booked up, and you can put him in a bad spot if he can't understand what you want or can't do what you'd like. If you want a Mass or Masses, ask the priest if he can accept X Mass Intentions, and then he can tell you how soon he could say them and if it's possible. I know too many priests who have received impossible anonymous requests and since it concerns Justice, were put in a very bad situation of trying to guess the desires given the impossibility.)

Also, once one has made an habitual intention and not revoked it, that intention carries through. It is called a "virtual intention". It is obviously better that we specifically recall the intention, but if I intend, for instance, to say all my Rosaries for the next year for the intentions of the SSPX Rosary Crusade, should I forget to specifically renew that at each Rosary, it still "counts".

So if it's becoming burdensome to recall all the intentions, what about writing your intentions on a sheet you can laminate and keep in your main prayer book. Then when you pray, whether you have the sheet in front of you or not, offer the prayers for the intentions on the sheet, and then name a few in particular which you want to especially remember in these prayers. That covers everything and is less burdensome. It also allows you to make an habitual intention, so even if you forget or can't remembers, you can always fall back on "the intentions on my sheet".
Thank you all very much for your replies; they were very helpful! I want to note to all of you that my purpose was not to insinuate a kind of scrupulosity. I decided to name the topic "housekeeping" to convey the idea that, for me, this was merely a practical conundrum and I didn't have the a clear way of keeping things in good order.

While I understand that sometimes folks can get a bit too overly concerned about technical details, and they lose the purpose of prayer, my situation was regarding the fact that it didn't seem that I was approaching my intentions in the most fitting way that I could for Christ, but I was not getting paranoid that I was just doing it all wrong and He wasn't going to listen. It was simply getting cumbersome and unnatural in some ways.

You all have done me a great service. Thanks again.