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HERE! HERE! Bring back the "Extraordinary" Form!!!!






http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/commenta...nary-form/

Why young Catholics love the Extraordinary Form – CatholicHerald.co.uk
by Benedict Turvill



[Image: 20110516cnsbr05615-800x500.jpg]
The Extraordinary Form: shaped by the faith of the Church for 1,500 years (CNS)

But don't expect them to disparage the Novus Ordo

As a young Catholic growing up in an increasingly secular (or even post-secular) Britain, I am lucky to be able to attend the Extraordinary Form of the Mass. There is something about the purity and beauty of the Catholic culture that it represents that I, and many other young Catholics, find enticing.

The Latin, the Gregorian chant, the priest facing ad orientem and even the Roman biretta are ingredients in a spiritual feast that represents an oasis of replenishing beauty from the madness of the modern world.

I love the Extraordinary Form because it is so unashamedly and distinctively Catholic. It represents a brave and missionary faith willing to take on the world, and affirm our identity in so doing. It is the Mass of the greatest popes and saints of the Church’s long history and stands apart from so much of the culture of our day: a battle standard for spiritual combat with the forces of evil.

Most importantly, it is something that the younger generations of Catholics covet as something nearly lost. Its value is heightened by the fact that we never grew up with it. And now we have easier access to the Form, we do make the most of it: last year I attended an Extraordinary Form Requiem for All Souls’ Day in York. Fauré’s Requiem was sung by the choir at St Wilfrid’s Church which, combined with the solemnity and dignity of the celebration, helped give the Mass great numinosity. Fortunately for me, such splendour is available weekly.

However, it would be wrong to assume that solemnity, beauty and spiritual armour cannot be found within the rich folds of the Novus Ordo Mass, a liturgy which has its own merits and which I am proud to have grown up with. I admire the way that the glorious essence of the Mass is made more accessible through the structural simplifications of the Novus Ordo, which are appealing in themselves. This gives the Mass a sense of versatility and of course brings the laity into the celebration. A liturgy in the vernacular is also not without its benefits. All in all it is, arguably, a cleaner weapon than the Extraordinary Form, which is far more theatrical and splendid.

I remarked above that part of the value of the Extraordinary Form is that it has been shaped by the faith of the Church over the past 1,500 years. I feel the correct view of the Novus Ordo would be to see it as another development in the long – and unfinished – history of the Church. It was born out of the Second Vatican Council, and has therefore been shaped by the witness of the Church and the leadership of great popes, many of whom – St John XXIII, Blessed Paul VI and St John Paul the Great – gaze upon the beatific vision because of their service to the Church, of which their role in the establishment of the Novus Ordo was a key element.

Furthermore, who can deny the orthodoxy and holiness of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI or – despite secular media coverage to the contrary – Pope Francis? These men are dedicated to the Novus Ordo, as their predecessors were.

In discussing particular devotions to particular liturgies – a discussion not limited to these two Forms, lest we forget the Eastern Catholic Church – we must remember that we all belong to the same tradition. Indeed, to overzealously stress the importance of one Form over another sets the Church on a path to serious internal division.

The unfortunate Society of St Pius X is a prime example of this. Elements of this group claim that the Novus Ordo is an insult to God, and deny the validity of the canonisation of St John Paul the Great. Extremism makes idiots of us all.

I could go further into Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre’s supposed issues with the documents of the Second Vatican Council. But, since he signed them, I don’t think there’s much point.

I would stress that all Catholics should be appalled by the heterodox abuses of the liturgy in the immediate post-conciliar decades. Regardless of which Form you celebrate, the Mass ought to be the most beautiful thing on earth, as befits the sacramental reality.

I give heartfelt thanks to Benedict XVI for his motu proprio Summorum Pontificum. This marvellous document allows Catholics to celebrate both Forms of the Roman Rite of the Mass in a way that enables the tradition to self-fertilise and increasingly enrich itself. We should not see the different Forms as the battle standards of opposed factions within the Church, but as a valuable expansion of our arsenal as we strive for the conversion of the culture.

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And this related article:


http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/news/201...n-decades/

Ordinations in the Extraordinary Form to take place in England and Wales for the ‘first time in decades’ – CatholicHerald.co.uk
by Staff Reporter

[Image: 20160524T1537-3619-CNS-DOMINICAN-ORDAINA...00x500.jpg]
Eleven men lie prostrate during their ordination as priests (CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Catholic Standard)

Two ordinations will take place at St Mary's Shrine Church in Warrington in June

Ordinations in the Extraordinary Form will take place in England and Wales possibly for the first time in decades next year.

At the request of the Priestly Fraternity of St Peter (FSSP) and with the permission of Archbishop Malcolm McMahon of Liverpool, two deacons will be ordained to the priesthood on June 17.

The ordinations will take place at St Mary’s Shrine Church in Warrington, North West England.

Writing in the Catholic Herald this week, Fr Armand de Malleray, superior of FSSP in England and Wales, said: “This could be the first time for decades that priests will be ordained in the Extraordinary Form in England. While more bishops worldwide do so – even in their own cathedrals, as in Sydney, Lincoln and Omaha, Toulon and Linz – it does not seem to have occurred over here since the liturgical changes.

“St Mary’s Shrine Church is a fitting place for the ceremony, due to its beautiful Pugin design and because Archbishop McMahon has established it as ‘a centre for the celebration of the Extraordinary Form of Mass and the sacraments’.”

The candidates due to be ordained are Alex Stewart, from Wallasey, and Krzysztof Sanetra, who was born in Poland in 1983 but has been resident in England for some time.

Joseph Shaw, chairman of the Latin Mass Society, said: “This is an important step forward for the integration of the Extraordinary Form into the life of the Church in England and Wales. Many young men from this country have heard the call to serve the Church as priests in the context of the Extraordinary Form, and they are making a valued contribution to the Catholic community in specially dedicated churches or chaplaincies in five different dioceses.

“It is natural and right that our bishops should play a part in ordaining them. Both of these deacons have been supported in their studies by the Latin Mass Society,” he said.

In his article, Fr de Malleray reflected on the recent history of the church where the two men are to be ordained. He said: “The beautiful church of St Mary’s was to be shut down due to shortage of priests. The congregation were not familiar with the Extraordinary Form Mass. But if our priests could keep their church alive, they were ready to give it a try, generously. We have been here 10 months. Most parishioners stayed on, and new faces appeared. With more than 300 visitors per week and three full-time clergy between 29 and 45 years of age, St Mary’s Shrine seems to have a future. Thank God and Our Lady.”

The Priestly Fraternity of St Peter currently has 160 seminarians in Europe and America. The order is made up of 421 priests and future priests in 120 dioceses around the world.

Applause Priest Amen!

It was for the most part a lovely article, but I disliked the unnecessary insult to the SSPX.  It would have been better to focus on the positive.  Do younger traditional Catholics tend to be unaware of the history of why we still have the "extraordinary form" of the Mass?
Quote:However, it would be wrong to assume that solemnity, beauty and spiritual armour cannot be found within the rich folds of the Novus Ordo Mass
From this point on the article seems like it's try to make sure reader doesn't think them as one of those crazy traditionalist Catholics who hates everything having to do with the modern Church. Let's even throw in a reassurance that Pope Francis is great too. Then to top it all off, let's bash the SSPX to make sure the reader knows we're not one of those types.

IMO, there's no reason to create an article talking about the merits of TLM and then feel the need to justify the NO, etc. If you want to talk about how wonderful TLM is, then make the article 100% about TLM without mentioning all of the other nonsense. Why does the NO, SSPX, etc. even need to be mentioned?
(09-09-2016, 03:49 PM)iona_scribe Wrote: [ -> ]It was for the most part a lovely article, but I disliked the unnecessary insult to the SSPX.  It would have been better to focus on the positive.  Do younger traditional Catholics tend to be unaware of the history of why we still have the "extraordinary form" of the Mass?

Not only that, but didn't Lefebvre regret signing the documents? It did seem like the author was trying to bash the name of the SSPX.
(09-09-2016, 03:57 PM)GangGreen Wrote: [ -> ]
Quote:However, it would be wrong to assume that solemnity, beauty and spiritual armour cannot be found within the rich folds of the Novus Ordo Mass
From this point on the article seems like it's try to make sure reader doesn't think them as one of those crazy traditionalist Catholics who hates everything having to do with the modern Church. Let's even throw in a reassurance that Pope Francis is great too. Then to top it all off, let's bash the SSPX to make sure the reader knows we're not one of those types.

IMO, there's no reason to create an article talking about the merits of TLM and then feel the need to justify the NO, etc. If you want to talk about how wonderful TLM is, then make the article 100% about TLM without mentioning all of the other nonsense. Why does the NO, SSPX, etc. even need to be mentioned?

This ^
I would think that with all the noise in the world, and the fact that we're always "busy" all the time with our technology and what not, that the Tridentine Mass would be a welcome change of pace. I know it sure is for me. I don't have to say anything. I don't have to do anything physically except kneel and stand at a few appointed times.  I don't have the pressure of thinking it is up to me to make this "work."  The Tridentine Mass gives people the chance to say to themselves "it really isn't all about me."  Personally, I find that very relieving.