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Matthew 2 1-2 read, "When Jesus therefore was born in Bethlehem of Juda, in the days of king Herod, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem. [2] Saying, Where is he that is born king of the Jews? For we have seen his star in the east, and are come to adore him."

How would they know of Christ's birth?  They saw and followed the star, but how would they have know it was the sign of Christ's birth?  Being from the east, they were likely from Persia, so would they have known of the scriptures foretelling Christ's birth?  Is there a traditional Catholic view on this?
"The position of a fixed star in the heavens varies at most one degree each day. No fixed star could have so moved before the Magi as to lead them to Bethlehem; neither fixed star nor comet could have disappeared, and reappeared, and stood still. Only a miraculous phenomenon could have been the Star of Bethlehem. It was like the miraculous pillar of fire which stood in the camp by night during Israel's Exodus (Exodus 13:21), or to the "brightness of God" which shone round about the shepherds (Luke 2:9), or to "the light from heaven" which shone around about the stricken Saul (Acts 9:3).

The philosophy of the Magi, erroneous though it was, led them to the journey by which they were to find Christ. Magian astrology postulated a heavenly counterpart to complement man's earthly self and make up the complete human personality. His "double" (the fravashi of the Parsi) developed together with every good man until death united the two. The sudden appearance of a new and brilliant star suggested to the Magi the birth of an important person. They came to adore him — i.e., to acknowledge the Divinity of this newborn King (vv. 2, 8, 11)."

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09527a.htm
(01-09-2017, 10:20 AM)Jeeter Wrote: [ -> ]Matthew 2 1-2 read, "When Jesus therefore was born in Bethlehem of Juda, in the days of king Herod, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem. [2] Saying, Where is he that is born king of the Jews? For we have seen his star in the east, and are come to adore him."

How would they know of Christ's birth?  They saw and followed the star, but how would they have know it was the sign of Christ's birth?  Being from the east, they were likely from Persia, so would they have known of the scriptures foretelling Christ's birth?  Is there a traditional Catholic view on this?


Note around twelve minutes into video.

(01-09-2017, 03:28 PM)In His Love Wrote: [ -> ]"The position of a fixed star in the heavens varies at most one degree each day. No fixed star could have so moved before the Magi as to lead them to Bethlehem; neither fixed star nor comet could have disappeared, and reappeared, and stood still. Only a miraculous phenomenon could have been the Star of Bethlehem. It was like the miraculous pillar of fire which stood in the camp by night during Israel's Exodus (Exodus 13:21), or to the "brightness of God" which shone round about the shepherds (Luke 2:9), or to "the light from heaven" which shone around about the stricken Saul (Acts 9:3).

The philosophy of the Magi, erroneous though it was, led them to the journey by which they were to find Christ. Magian astrology postulated a heavenly counterpart to complement man's earthly self and make up the complete human personality. His "double" (the fravashi of the Parsi) developed together with every good man until death united the two. The sudden appearance of a new and brilliant star suggested to the Magi the birth of an important person. They came to adore him — i.e., to acknowledge the Divinity of this newborn King (vv. 2, 8, 11)."

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09527a.htm

It would be interesting to look at Persian archaeology and anthropology to see if they even believed in such a thing and if a star behaving oddly would have meant anything to them more specific than an omen of some sort.  The whole story sounds like pure myth, but if there is some historical evidence that Persian astrologers actually would have looked for such a star and it would have directed them to follow it, it would give the Biblical account more credence.
If their coming took two years, perhaps they came from even further afield than Persia/Babylonia,  like China or, pehaps, the Tocharian culture of the Tarim Basin.
(01-09-2017, 10:20 AM)Jeeter Wrote: [ -> ]Being from the east, they were likely from Persia, so would they have known of the scriptures foretelling Christ's birth?  Is there a traditional Catholic view on this?

The sequence for Christmas, Lætabundus, seems to think so, that Christ's birth was foretold even to the Gentiles:

Si non suis vatibus,
credat vel gentilibus;
Sibyllinis versibus
haec praedicta.