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Today we read Matthew's account of the Transfiguration. One of my favourite events in Jesus' life! I love to read the accounts of the Transfiguration.

But it's the second Sunday of Lent.

A friend asks if that's not a little strange. Like, wouldn't it be strange to read the Christmas or Easter readings at another time of the year? Well, is it strange to read this one on a day other than the feast of the Transfiguration?
The Transfiguration occurs prior to Our Lord's journey to Jerusalem to be crucified. We hear Jesus talking with Moses and Elijah about his coming Passion. It also gives the three Apostles a glimpse of the Divinity of Christ which they normally cannot see because it is veiled from their human senses (in a similar way we can see a parallel with the Eucharist). In a sense we can say that the Transfiguration helps strengthen the Apostle's faith with what they are going to witness soon after. It should strengthen every believer to his death on the Cross and subsequent Resurrection. Even today, we are in the midst of Lent doing our prayers, penances/fasting, alms giving and the Transfiguration should give us hope and to direct us towards the joy of Easter and that if we keep on the path of following Christ we will be able to truly see Him glorified in such a way and even more splendidly in heaven.

At least that's how I see it.
Awestruck at the sight of the transfigured Lord who was speaking with Moses and Elijah, Peter, James and John were suddenly overshadowed by a cloud, out of which came a voice which proclaimed: "This is my beloved Son on whom my favour rests; listen to him" (Mk 9:7).

When one has the grace to live a strong experience of God, it is as if one is living an experience similar to that of the disciples during the Transfiguration: a momentary foretaste of what will constitute the happiness of Paradise. These are usually brief experiences that are sometimes granted by God, especially prior to difficult trials.

No one, however, is permitted to live "on Tabor" while on earth. Indeed, human existence is a journey of faith and as such, moves ahead more in shadows than in full light, and is no stranger to moments of obscurity and also of complete darkness. While we are on this earth, our relationship with God takes place more by listening than by seeing; and the same contemplation comes about, so to speak, with closed eyes, thanks to the interior light that is kindled in us by the Word of God.

  ~ Pope Benedict XVI
(03-12-2017, 10:21 PM)bryanreynolds Wrote: [ -> ]Today we read Matthew's account of the Transfiguration. One of my favourite events in Jesus' life! I love to read the accounts of the Transfiguration.

But it's the second Sunday of Lent.

A friend asks if that's not a little strange. Like, wouldn't it be strange to read the Christmas or Easter readings at another time of the year? Well, is it strange to read this one on a day other than the feast of the Transfiguration?

What I find stranger is that the Gospel of the previous day, Ember Saturday, is also St. Matthew's account of the Transfiguration.

Of course, traditional Anglicans follow the mediæval English use where the Gospel for Lent II is the Healing of the Canaanite Woman's Daughter, so we don't have to worry about such anomalies.  :)
(03-15-2017, 10:27 PM)Vidugavia Wrote: [ -> ]What I find stranger is that the Gospel of the previous day, Ember Saturday, is also St. Matthew's account of the Transfiguration.

The Ember Saturday Mass, with its multiple readings, plus ordinations, originally took place on Saturday night and into Sunday morning, so the following Sunday had no proper Mass. The same happened on the Ember Saturday before the IV Sunday of Advent, and both of those Masses also have the same Gospel.
(03-18-2017, 06:33 PM)Paul Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-15-2017, 10:27 PM)Vidugavia Wrote: [ -> ]What I find stranger is that the Gospel of the previous day, Ember Saturday, is also St. Matthew's account of the Transfiguration.

The Ember Saturday Mass, with its multiple readings, plus ordinations, originally took place on Saturday night and into Sunday morning, so the following Sunday had no proper Mass. The same happened on the Ember Saturday before the IV Sunday of Advent, and both of those Masses also have the same Gospel.

Any idea why this isn't so for the Pentecost Ember Saturday (Luke 4) and the First Sunday after Pentecost (Luke 6)?
(03-18-2017, 10:31 PM)Vidugavia Wrote: [ -> ]Any idea why this isn't so for the Pentecost Ember Saturday (Luke 4) and the First Sunday after Pentecost (Luke 6)?

I'm not sure when the Masses for Advent and Lent were finally set as they are now. Originally the First Sunday after Pentecost was also vacant, but there's a long custom of honouring the Trinity on that Sunday, even though the current Feast wasn't extended to the entire Church until the 1300s. It may be that the Mass for the First Sunday after Pentecost was composed later, and, since it didn't belong to a season like Advent or Lent, it wasn't felt necessary to keep the Gospel readings that were already read for those days.

The Gospel for Ember Saturday in September isn't used for a Sunday, but it's a different Sunday each year, so that's likely why for that.