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Full Version: Just released: Official logo for Pope’s visit to Egypt
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                                                              The Cross and Crescent Moon at the center of the logo represent the coexistence between the various components of the Egyptian people. http://aleteia.org/2017/03/31/just-relea...-to-egypt/

                                                              NOT MY POPE
I was expecting a weird logo, like the one for the Year of Mercy.  I'm relieved that it's more tasteful than that hideous thing was.  Still, I have to be careful not to let my guard down too much.  After all, Jesus said "I have not come to bring peace but the sword."  True peace is not "coexisting."  True peace comes only from true unity with Christ and the One True Faith.
Why a stylized, "budded" cross, rather than a more conventional Latin cross?
(04-03-2017, 06:37 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: [ -> ]Why a stylized, "budded" cross, rather than a more conventional Latin cross?

Probably because Christianity in Egypt is almost entirely Eastern.
Yes, but with the exceptions of ancient communities of Chalcedonian Greeks (mostly in Alexandria) and the Armenians (present since at least the Fatimid period), they are Copts. Is that specific style of cross in general use among the Copts, or is it just generically "Eastern" in flavor? The images I have found of Coptic processional crosses, pectoral crosses, architectural crosses on Coptic churches and monasteries, traditional wrist tattoos worn by Coptic laity, and on vestments worn by Coptic clergy, look somewhat different.
"Pope of peace in Egypt of peace"

What does that even mean? And why is this even a thing that needs a logo or a tag line?
(04-03-2017, 07:28 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: [ -> ]Yes, but with the exceptions of ancient communities of Chalcedonian Greeks (mostly in Alexandria) and the Armenians (present since at least the Fatimid period), they are Copts. Is that specific style of cross in general use among the Copts, or is it just generically "Eastern" in flavor? The images I have found of Coptic processional crosses, pectoral crosses, architectural crosses on Coptic churches and monasteries, traditional wrist tattoos worn by Coptic laity, and on vestments worn by Coptic clergy, look somewhat different.

It's not common for pectoral crosses, but it seems to be the most common on the tops of Coptic church buildings.
(04-03-2017, 08:01 PM)ermy_law Wrote: [ -> ]"Pope of peace in Egypt of peace"

What does that even mean? And why is this even a thing that needs a logo or a tag line?

I like the Arabic. "Bābā as-salām(i)." I guess the "of peace" construction is equivalent to a genitive of definition or genitive of quality, akin to a nominal compound in English, e.g, "the Peace Pope."

I would like to call the Holy Father the Salami Baba in commemoration of this historic visit.
When were papal visits cheapened to the point of needing logos and slogans?
(04-03-2017, 10:49 PM)Mark Williams Wrote: [ -> ]When were papal visits cheapened to the point of needing logos and slogans?

There have certainly been World Youth Day logos at least back into the 90s. The earliest papal visit logo I came across in a cursory Google Image search is Benedict XVI's "Papstbesuch" to Germany in 2011. I know for a fact he had a logo when he visited the US, since there was a huge "Christ our Hope" banner with the image of His Holiness hanging on the Basilica in DC. I remember being a bit uncomfortable with that logo, and it was more tasteful by miles than any of the Francis-era logos.

This logo for Egypt does look like something produced in the Middle East. I don't have the design vocabulary to describe it, but it looks like a Middle Eastern ad. I am also unaware that we were calling Pope Francis "pope of peace"; did I miss a memo? At least "pope of mercy" would make sense based on his output. Maybe it's wishful thinking, like "Egypt of peace" has to be...

As an enthusiast for Semitic languages, I do enjoy the double construct chain.