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An English article about France that interests me (even if I am not in agreement with all of it). The situation in France is well worth watching these days, but, of course, the most insightful stuff is in French ... link: http://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.ph...-of-fatima



CATHOLIC FRANCE RISING: Tens of Thouands to Walk French Pilgrimage Dedicated to Our Lady of Fatima Featured
Written by  Michael Matt | Editor


The first time I walked the Pilgrimage from Paris to Chartres, France, I was 24 years old. I was young and the world was a mess, yes, but so much less so than it is today. People smiled more readily back then. The world wasn’t quite so jaded.

Now I realize that it’s well within the prerogative of grumpy old curmudgeons to think the world is blacker and bleaker today than it was back when they were walking uphill both ways to school every day through driving blizzards. But this is different. It really is so much worse now than then, and I think it’s a statistically provable fact.

Nothing’s the same anymore.

When I went on pilgrimage back in 1991 we were still travelling to the other side of the world to a place that had its own culture, language and currency. It was actually a foreign country in the truest sense of the word. McDonald’s in Paris? Yeah, right!

I remember the hassle involved with calling home. It usually involved a pile of coins, a payphone and a midnight stroll. When I telephone my wife from Paris these days, I pull out my cellphone and say, robotically: “Siri, call home”. And that’s it. I sound like a complete lunatic, of course, asking my little Star Trek communicator to phone home for me, but there you have it. Men appearing to behave like lunatics is yet another sign of the advancement of our civilization.

And then there was the problem with language. At the time, I spoke no French and not many Frenchmen spoke English. So we’d all babble away and see if any of it landed. It was fun, but nothing like today.

These days, I have some French but rarely need it, since everyone speaks English in France, especially in Paris, and if you’ve a mind (and no sense of culture at all), you can order a Starbucks on the Champs-Élysées in English and get whatever New World Order flavor you like best.

Then there were the French Francs and the currency exchange. It wasn’t unusual for the rookie traveler to just open his wallet, exasperated, and ask the merchant to grab whatever he needed to complete the transaction. It was a lot easier (if more expensive). Today, if you need to purchase something you use your credit card, of course, because Big Brother doesn’t want us leaving home without it. And we don’t.

And then there’s the little issue of terrorism. When I first went to France I could have boarded the plane with my shotgun in hand, so long as it was in its case and not loaded. These days, a passenger has to take off his shoes, belt, jacket and undergo an entire body scan just to get in the general proximity of the gate area. And if you so much as joke about guns you’ll spend your vacation in front of guys pointing them at you.

The atmosphere of international travel really is like something out of Nineteen Eighty-Four. Big Brother is everywhere—watching, monitoring, scanning. You can’t get away from him but, what’s worse, you’re oddly comforted by the omnipresence of his all-seeing eye, knowing that he is all that stands between you and the Grim Reaper in a dynamite vest. The world’s airports are filled with global citizens grateful to Big Brother, even those few that hate everything he is and everything for which he stands. Life is his to take and give.

The airports on both sides of the Atlantic are patrolled by soldiers of the New Disorder, naturally—grim little platoons, comprised usually of one Madame Defarge-looking female and two males, machine guns at the ready. The New World Order will have order, even if they have to shoot everyone to establish it. After all, in the past the world was terrorized by really terrible things, such as the Spanish Inquisition, oh me oh my!

Flying the friendly skies just isn’t what it used to be, unless you used to be incarcerated, in which case you’ll feel right at home.

So I may be a curmudgeon but that doesn’t mean we’re not approaching a positively post-apocalyptic world, the likes of which no previous generation in human history ever experienced, even if the Volors are a bit faster now (hat tip to Msgr. Benson). 

God is gone and guns and killing machines are a vital component of Utopia’s international civilization of love.

So just getting to France has changed rather dramatically in 26 years. And with the passing of each year, the organizers of the Pilgrimage to Chartres are induced to take ever more security precautions as they launch the 5-mile pilgrim column through the streets of Paris—a city that over the past 26 years has gone from a French majority to Muslim, with its Christian heritage having gone the way of the French Franc, English street signs all over the place, and patriotism equated with fascism and hate. This is not your grandmother’s Paris anymore.

On the other hand, France’s Front National has gone, in the same time period, from a tiny little gaggle of misfits, “neo-Nazis” (of course and NOT!), and monarchists which could be safely ignored by Europe’s power elites, to a major party that just came in second in France’s presidential race. Who saw that coming 26 years ago when I first walked the Chartres Pilgrimage?

Nobody! It’s a big deal, despite yesterday’s loss, and it’s only going to get bigger in years to come, so inept and nationally suicidal is France’s mainstream political power structure.  Now if only the Front National could become as hard-right conservative as La-La Land European secularists think it is.



Still and despite terrorism, political flux, and no-go zones, each year the Pilgrimage grows stronger, larger and more unapologetically Catholic. What’s left of Catholic France is not backing down from an encroaching New World Order, because what’s left of Catholic France is a growing and thriving minority of Traditional Catholics who see the proclamation of the Kingship of Christ, the Latin Mass and the large Catholic family as the only way to make France French again.

The Pilgrimage to Chartres is made up of hundreds of what are called les chapitres or “chapters”—groups of about 50 pilgrims each, usually from the same parish or Catholic organization.

There are all kinds of new chapters forming, including a vibrant chapter of displaced Iraqi Christians.  And last year, a chapter made up of non-Catholics, fallen-away Catholics and perhaps even a few atheists was formed. Where did they come from?

So each year as the long column wends its way through Paris, local folks in windows and storefronts look on in bewilderment at the sight of the Catholic thing. They watch pilgrims from all over Europe carrying statues of Our Lady on their shoulders, wearing the Sacre Coeur, praying rosaries, singing the old Catholic hymns. The curiosity factor is enormous.

So last year, some enterprising chap in the Notre-Dame de Chretiente organization had the idea of trying to reach out to those onlookers and invite them to attend the pilgrimage, free of charge, to better understand this massive spectacle that takes place in their neighborhoods every year over Pentecost weekend.

After a screening process to establish good will, there was enough of these curious spectators to form an entire chapter of would-be pilgrims, many of whom will return this year. Someone took the time to look up at them sitting in their windows and say: “Hey, you want find out what you’re missing? Follow us.” And by the grace of God it worked.

This, in essence, is what the Pilgrimage to Chartres is all about—making a public demonstration of Catholic faith and values to a world at war with both. The Pilgrimage to Chartres is all about saying to the world: Je suis Chretiene!...and quite frankly we don’t give a flying baguette if you don’t like it!

For 26 years we at The Remnant have vigorously supported this event because it has the same message for young Americans— “Hey, you want to find out what they stole from you? Follow us. We’re Catholics and we’re proud of it!”

Islam tells young Muslims the world over to follow Allah, and they do to such an extent that much of the world is now growing fearful of waking up Islamic. We Christians were once like that, too, and we must become that way again, only with the true God, Christ the King Lord of History. Nothing else matters.

chartres 2012We’re not interested in establishing our legitimacy in the eyes of the world. We have no need to win the approval of a modern Church which has abandoned the Traditions of Christ’s Holy Church.

Our young people must be made to understand that the world is at war with Christ, whether our Church wants to admit it or not. The infidel of old advances against our countries and our families, and the only way to stop him is with the Cross. There’s no better way to drive this point home than to join 15,000 Catholics from all over the world in a holy march across France.

The key to the survival of the Catholic family today is the Crusade itself—the fight to remain detached from a world drunk on the blood of the innocent and a Church that has clearly lost its way.

Better than any sermon, the Pilgrimage to Chartres allows young Catholics to experience exactly what was stolen from them and what they must be willing to give their lives taking back—not out of mere duty, but out of love for what they lost and what they will find again along the road to Chartres.

NOTE: I trimmed a little bit off the end of the article that was less relevant, but you can see it at the link above with photos
It's fascinating to watch this stuff Mr. Buck. While I've never been to France and have no real desire to do so it's nice to know there really is a diehard minority of Catholics left there.  Are there any bishops involved with this pilgrimage, and by bishops I mean those in regular communion with Rome,not SSPX or sedevacantists. I'm genuinely curious.  How is this pilgrimage reported in the average diocesan bulletin or newspapers? Are people heckled and spat upon the way I've heard happens in places like Montreal?

By the way in still reading your book and finding it mighty enjoyable and enlightening.  I might shoot you a PM once I'm done to discuss a few things with you that jumped out at me.
It is indeed fascinating to watch this unfold. I pray this is the beginning of a restoration of the Church there.

In a way, it reminds me of what Pooe Benedict XVI said, about how the Church in coming years will be smaller, yet more devout. I see it happening to a degree in VA, with people deciding where to live based off reviews of the parishes.
Not to poke holes in this but . . .
I was in Paris in the early 1990s and there was indeed a McDonalds on the Champs-Élysées - even back then.  You could watch movies in VO and see all the American movies in English right there too.  There is a bit of false nostalgia in this piece.  Or perhaps I just know the city a little better than the author. 

However, I too have seen a growing Catholic presence in France and a joyous one, especially when the older folks see a big family like mine. 

I miss the franc . . .  The euro doesn't feel the same at all.  sad
(05-13-2017, 09:36 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote: [ -> ]Are there any bishops involved with this pilgrimage, and by bishops I mean those in regular communion with Rome,not SSPX or sedevacantists. I'm genuinely curious.

Yep. I know Bishop Athanasius Schneider was involved, and prayed mass during the pilgrimage. And a couple other bishops who I don't recognize. https://youtu.be/B6157Q-kan8?t=1247
(05-13-2017, 11:44 AM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]Not to poke holes in this but . . .
I was in Paris in the early 1990s and there was indeed a McDonalds on the Champs-Élysées - even back then.

There was one there by at least 1986 (could've been '84 or '85). (I don't think the one I saw was on the Champs-Elysees, though. I mostly hung out in the Latin Quarter.) (Le Drugstore is gone, Fontrevault. Read that online somewhere...) (want to hear something sad? Going to France was a dream for me since I was in 7th grade. A MAJOR passion. I was in love. When I finally made it there, with my Mom and thanks to my Mom --  I had a raging headache the entire week I was there. Don't it just figger?)

Anyway, the writer's overall point is what it is, and I'm glad there are Catholics in France who take the Faith seriously. Here's to the hope that France restores sanity so those Catholics don't have to become martyrs.
Thanks for posting this, Roger. There was a time I had hoped to make the pilgrimage. Unfortunately, I waited too long. I'm lucky to be able to walk ten blocks now, and even then, I have to sit down and rest a couple of times.
(05-13-2017, 07:25 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-13-2017, 11:44 AM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]Not to poke holes in this but . . .
I was in Paris in the early 1990s and there was indeed a McDonalds on the Champs-Élysées - even back then.

There was one there by at least 1986 (could've been '84 or '85). (I don't think the one I saw was on the Champs-Elysees, though. I mostly hung out in the Latin Quarter.) (Le Drugstore is gone, Fontrevault. Read that online somewhere...) (want to hear something sad? Going to France was a dream for me since I was in 7th grade. A MAJOR passion. I was in love. When I finally made it there, with my Mom and thanks to my Mom --  I had a raging headache the entire week I was there. Don't it just figger?)

Anyway, the writer's overall point is what it is, and I'm glad there are Catholics in France who take the Faith seriously. Here's to the hope that France restores sanity so those Catholics don't have to become martyrs.

The writer's overall point is a good one - I certainly agree.  There are more Catholics in France who seem interested in their faith and willing to go out of their way for it.  For example, within an hour of my parents' house are 4 TLMs of varying sorts.  The local diocesan masses are poorly attended and the bishop is mean enough to refuse to allow priests to visit small community chapels - I think in an attempt to consolidate resources.  Do you know what people are doing?  Finding "rogue priests" willing to say mass anyway.  I'd say that the hierarchy (in general) is not helping matters but that people are finding their way around it.  Only time will tell.

I haven't been back to Paris since 2000 or so.  My parents moved to the south and I haven't had the travel time or money to make it back.  I am sure that so much has changed as to break my heart.  I can close my eyes and see and smell the city around me.  I could probably navigate without a plan de Paris even after all these years . . .  Some places just get into your heart and head and stay there.  I think Paris (and France in general) was the first place to really feel like home.  And here I am in Colorado - so far from "home" that it hurts.  Maybe someday I'll get back . . .
(05-13-2017, 09:36 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote: [ -> ]It's fascinating to watch this stuff Mr. Buck. While I've never been to France and have no real desire to do so it's nice to know there really is a diehard minority of Catholics left there.  Are there any bishops involved with this pilgrimage, and by bishops I mean those in regular communion with Rome,not SSPX or sedevacantists. I'm genuinely curious.  How is this pilgrimage reported in the average diocesan bulletin or newspapers? Are people heckled and spat upon the way I've heard happens in places like Montreal?

By the way in still reading your book and finding it mighty enjoyable and enlightening.  I might shoot you a PM once I'm done to discuss a few things with you that jumped out at me.

Formerbuddhist, many thanks for this.

First about France, alas I only lived there two and half years and alas that was getting on for 10 years ago. So I am not current and not capable of saying much beyond very GENERAL  things like I found the French bishops generally far worse than the Anglosphere bishops and a great deal of enmity was stirred up about traditionalism when I was there.

For example, when the IBP was set up by Pope BXVI - allowing five former SSPX priests to create a new order in alignment with Rome - the French episcopacy, Catholic press etc completely lost it! Huge outcry ... But SPECIFIC things like your question re: spitting as at Montreal, I simply don't know.


I suspect Fontrevault would know better - and Fontevrault would LOVE to hear more from you about France. I feel homesick too, even though I am American! Fortunately, I love Ireland so much, my "homesickness" is manageable. If I were in France, I'd be "homesick" for Ireland ...


Also many thanks for your comments re my book. Private message is fine although I can be so slow.

However, for fairly obvious reasons, I would also welcome public discussion of the book and there is a thread about that here:

http://www.fisheaters.com/forums/index.p...sg34056159


I haven't kept it up because I didn't like the idea of talking to myself all the time! LOL

But one other Fishie has written me about it privately and  if either of you or anyone else wanted to talk publicly I would welcome that.

(Of course, for various reasons, you may both prefer pms. I understand that.)
I am highly interested in the Catholic royalist movement, Action Francaise. They've been condemned by the mainstream media for being anti-semitic, homophobic or racist or something, so you know they must be good, right?



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