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Full Version: Tips on talking with me parish priest, about my modernist RCIS class
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Awhile ago, I sent an email to my parish priest, expressing my concerns regarding my modernist RCIA class. Today, before mass, my parish priest spoke with me, and told me he's received my email. After talking, we're decided we're going to try and schedule an appointment for Wednesday. I was wondering if anyone could give me advice, on how to discuss my concerns with him? Here is a limited list of concerns and errors present in my RCIA class, there are more, but for now, I'll just leave it to the more obvious, and less "controversial" errors:

-Flip-flops on absolutism vs relativism.

-Encouragements to not "tow the party line" and implications that such people who do, should be looked down on.

-Outdated, and erroneous teaching material, such as, doctrine about Christ’s nature that sounded Nestorian. There was even a history lesson, that appeared to distorted the Nestorian crisis.

-Material that contradicted the class’s own view point, such as, material that sneered at reverence in liturgy, when the class actually showed some warmth to reverence in the liturgy

-A toxic environment, a lot of scoffing and self-righteousness, that made me feel unwelcome.

-Gossiping and back-biting, against certain groups and individuals within the parish.
Sounds like you should just say what you observed and that you are uncomfortable by it (apparently, they find it very important when we say we "are uncomfortable" with something . . . )

Either he will try to make improvements, or he won't care. At that point, it is sot of out of your hands.
Is your parrish priest a liberal or a conservative?
Sounds like your parish needs new materials.  Perhaps you can work with the RCIA minister to acquire some.  I'd be careful with the "This is heresy section-A-dash-two-three" as many people will just assume 'know-it-all'.  Instead it seems to me the problem is they are teaching heterodoxy from out-dated heterodox materials. 

Solution: Get updated orthodox materials.
Just bring in some of the Doctors of the Church to set thing straight.
(06-19-2017, 01:16 PM)JosefSilouan Wrote: [ -> ]Is your parrish priest a liberal or a conservative?

Well that's my main concern, I don't know what his position is. My instructor called him a "conservative" once but considering she's a full-blown modernist, who went out of her way to bash Traditional Catholicism and spread lies and myths, that could mean anything. I'm really unsure, when it comes to priest, he shows good signs here, and questionable signs there, so he's the real unknown in this.
It sounds like you need to have your instruction one on one. It could be with the priest, or perhaps with a qualified lay person. If you know anything about Nestorianism and other stuff like that already, RCIA most likely isn't the place for you.
The first question to ask yourself, and you must answer it honestly, is whether you are trying to correct your Priest because you believe that he is endangering his soul or the souls of his parishioners, or because you are infected with pride. It's a legitimate question, and we have all, I am sure, been guilty of speaking from a place of pride when speaking to modernists.

The second question is whether or not your Priest will be receptive to your corrections. If he isn't, then you are just inviting a difficult situation. If he is, then you have to make sure to approach him properly.

Second of all, you need to do a very good job discerning what is modernist and what is Modernist (as in: the Modernist Heresy). Some things must be corrected, others should be corrected, and there are probably more things which we would rather be corrected but are not necessary to anyone's salvation to correct.

If all of these issues are answered correctly, then by all means: correct him. If any one of them is not able to be answered correctly, then you should either use this as an opportunity to suffer or find a new parish.
(06-19-2017, 04:28 PM)MaryLover Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-19-2017, 01:16 PM)JosefSilouan Wrote: [ -> ]Is your parrish priest a liberal or a conservative?

Well that's my main concern, I don't know what his position is. My instructor called him a "conservative" once but considering she's a full-blown modernist, who went out of her way to bash Traditional Catholicism and spread lies and myths, that could mean anything. I'm really unsure, when it comes to priest, he shows good signs here, and questionable signs there, so he's the real unknown in this.

If the priest turned out the be a liberal or pseudo-conservative, the meeting will be very difficult and you are in great danger to fall into one of two spiritual traps: either you accept heretic statements (however disguised they may be), or you feel obliged to directly contradict a spiritual superior, which is virtually impossible without being infected by intellectual pride.

My advice would be the following: read carefully the "Dubia" that Cardinal Burk et al. presented to their spiritual superior, Our Holy Father. This is the adequate way to express doubts. Do not directly contradict your priest, but express the issues in this manner: "There seems to be a contradiction between statement XY and what is stated in the Catechism in Paragraph ZZ….can you explain this discrepancy to me?" If you should get an obvious heretical answer, mortify yourself and stay silent. Your task has been fulfilled, the Lord will take it from there.

If you privately need a clear answers about the orthodoxy or heterodoxy of certain statements, I suggest you get the book "Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma" by Ludwig Ott. It's a magnificent overview of all Catholic dogmas and their respective status ("de fide" or merely theological opinion).
I've decided to float the concerns in the following way:

-Outdated, and erroneous teaching material, such as, doctrine about Christ’s nature that sounded Nestorian. There was even a history lesson, that appeared to distorted the Nestorian crisis.

-Material that contradicted the class’s own view point, such as, material that sneered at reverence in liturgy, when the class actually showed some warmth to reverence in the liturgy

-Flip-flops on absolutism vs relativism.

-A toxic environment, a lot of scoffing and self-righteousness, that made me feel unwelcome.

-Gossiping and back-biting, against certain groups and individuals within the parish.

-Encouragements to not "tow the party line" and implications that such people who do, should be looked down on.

-A highly questionable portrayal of God

If Conservative:

-Flip-flops on divorce and remarriage.

-An acceptance on Contraception.

-Acceptance of Homosexual activity, and little to no mention of helping Homosexuals live chastely

What do you think of this order, is it safe for both the priest and myself?

I'll try to be as passive as I can at the meeting.
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