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An Orthodox person brought up the point in a discussion - how can Mary be the Mediatrix of all Graces if there is such a thing as uncreated grace, not only created grace.. ? does this mean that Mary only mediates created graces? but then why do we say "all graces"? This relates to the other discussion about grace but it's a separate topic, hence this thread.. would be grateful for any thoughts, I'm a bit stuck  Smile thank you..  

Here's some background on the idea itself: http://www.christianperfection.info/tta16.php
(10-02-2017, 12:15 PM)little_flower10 Wrote: [ -> ]An Orthodox person brought up the point in a discussion - how can Mary be the Mediatrix of all Graces if there is such a thing as uncreated grace, not only created grace.. ? does this mean that Mary only mediates created graces? but then why do we say "all graces"? This relates to the other discussion about grace but it's a separate topic, hence this thread.. would be grateful for any thoughts, I'm a bit stuck  Smile thank you..  

Here's some background on the idea itself: http://www.christianperfection.info/tta16.php

It's definitely an idea that is curious (though not immediately to be rejected) from an Eastern perspective since grace is the energies of God which are everywhere present and fill all things, so in a sense would not need to be mediated. On the other hand, by becoming the Mother of the God-Man, she is a mediatrix of God from whom all good things come. And she is of course our preeminent intercessor among the saints in heaven.

I tend to think the word "all" is sometimes insisted upon too strongly, too literally. It seems wrong to make Mary some sort of "tube" through which the grace God pours down flows, and there were graces dispensed before Mary existed, so it cannot be taken in an absolutely literal sense. Though the idea is not usually meant in this way, I think of it more in terms of exalted language describing the trust the Christian people has always had in the Virgin – there is nothing under the sun that we cannot bring to her for her intercession, and she is the most powerful of intercessors. To try and make Mary a sort of instrument involved in every outpouring of grace seems to be pushing the limits of her humanity, at least to me.
Well to really oversimplify it all graces come from Jesus and Jesus came through Mary therefore all graces come through Mary. 

I suggest you read some of St. Louis de Montfort's works, he is really the one to go to in these matters.
Interesting topic for sure. I remember reading Gregory Palamas speaking about Mary in a way not dissimilar to Roman Catholics in this regard: "Mary alone forms the boundary between created and uncreated nature, and no one can come to God except through her and the Mediator born of her, and none of God’s gifts can be bestowed on angels or men except through her."
(10-02-2017, 06:19 PM)Florus Wrote: [ -> ]Interesting topic for sure. I remember reading Gregory Palamas speaking about Mary in a way not dissimilar to Roman Catholics in this regard: "Mary alone forms the boundary between created and uncreated nature, and no one can come to God except through her and the Mediator born of her, and none of God’s gifts can be bestowed on angels or men except through her."

I would like to see some Easterners engage that quote. A citation would probably be helpful though.
I came across a quote from Gregory Palamas too about mediation of Mary.. though a different quote.

My thought was maybe that uncreated graces become mediated by Our Lady once they become created (ie: given to us), but is that accurate? I thought I could look up something by Fr Garrigou Lagrange about this but I'm not sure if he's ever written about this particular subject.. I think he wrote about Mary being the Mediatrix but this is a very precise question.
I did come across this quote but how do we understand it? what does it mean?

St. Albert the Great “The Blessed Virgin is very properly called ‘gate of heaven,’ for every created or uncreated grace that ever came or will ever come into this world came through her."