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Just in time for the Feast of Christ the King. So much for "Be Thou King of those who are deceived by erroneous opinions, or whom discord keeps aloof, and call them back to the harbor of truth and unity of faith, so that there may be but one flock and one Shepherd."  From Lancaster Online:





At E-town's Christ Lutheran, a new Catholic-Lutheran tradition takes hold
EARLE CORNELIUS | Staff Writer
Oct 28, 2017

Led by the thurifer, the deacon/cantor and three acolytes, the Revs. A.J. Domines, pastor at Christ Lutheran Church, and Steven Fauser, pastor at St. Peter Catholic Church, walked side-by-side down the center aisle of Christ Lutheran in Elizabethtown Wednesday evening.

Outside, the church bells rang, saluting a joint Lutheran-Catholic service that Christ Lutheran historian Phillip P. Clark said had never before  been held in the church that was founded on High Street in 1772.

The idea for the joint service came from Domines, who suggested that a prominent time would be the week leading to the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s “Disputation on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences,”  which ultimately split the Catholic Church and led to the Protestant Reformation.

In his homily, Fauser joked about the date — “That sounds like, uh, a great idea,” he said he told Domines to laughter from the more than 150 people in attendance.

In fact, the idea was not to celebrate what divided the church for nearly five centuries but to share what the two traditions have in common.

Quote:The Church is not divided; She is One. And Holy. And Apostolic. And Catholic.
 
“It’s really not a time to celebrate because whenever there is division or separation, that’s not something to rejoice over,” Fauser said. “But for us to come together, for us to realize how, over these 500 years, what we have done to come together on the Wednesday meeting signifies  something special.”

Noting that the past gives the present its value, Fauser said  the two traditions share a history that, unfortunately, “for 450 years allowed us to be ruled by suspicion, by defensiveness, mutual condemnation, stubbornness, nasty politics and sadly, at times, even war. If anything deserves ... excommunication, it is those things.”

He said there was a time — even in Elizabethtown — when Catholics and Lutherans would not enter each other’s churches.
That changed with the Second Vatican Council in 1965.

Quote:... aaaaaaand there it is. The excuse for everything.
 
“Lutherans and Catholics have made great strides and taken time to learn from our past,” Fauser said. Looking out at the gathering, he  said, “We’ve come a long way.”
 
Quote:What's to learn on our side? The Church's hierarchs cracked down on those who were selling indulgences, so now what's your excuse?
 
Domines said the dialogue was important in bridging the gap that had long ago developed between the  traditions.


Quote:

“It helped us be a bit more liturgical,” he said of the Lutheran Church. “After Vatican II, a lot of Lutheran churches started to go back to weekly communion to emphasize those things that are similar.”

Quote:Read that again. They, the Lutherans, helped US, the Catholics, to be "more liturgical." A sickening commentary on the effects of Vatican II (or interpretations thereof, or its evil "spirit").
 
The worship service was preceded by a dinner in the church’s fellowship hall.

Quote:So they ate before they received Communion (or "communion," as the case may be). Nice.
 
For St. Peter members Frank and Annette Telenko, who had attended funerals at Christ Lutheran in the past, Wednesday’s service was different.

“The whole idea, the whole concept, I thought was really great,” she said. “It’s nice to come to a joyous celebration.”

Quote:
 
Christ Lutheran member Leslie Emrick said she was “excited to see the different churches come together.”

Quote:...'cept one's not a church.
 
The worship service included responses, sung prayers and readings. It concluded with the hymn “The Church’s One Foundation,” which is common to both the Catholic and Protestant churches.

The Rev. Fred Keller, of Lititz, a retired Lutheran pastor who helps at Christ Lutheran, described the service as “a wonderful thing because there is far more that we have in common than there are differences that divide us.”

As Greg Hitz handed church bulletins to attendees, he noted the significance of the occasion.

“It’s a long time coming, don’t you think?”

Quote:Which religious group's next? How's about joining up with some Muslims and going jihading! 
 

Other events

— St. Matthew Lutheran Church,  700 Pleasure Road, will host “Luther and the Reformation” — a one-hour movie hosted by Rick Steves at 3 p.m. today in the church’s fellowship hall. The film is ecumenical in tone. The event is sponsored by St. Matthew Seniors and is open to the public.

— Russ Kuhn will portray Martin Luther and preach the sermon at the 10:30 a.m. service Sunday at Bergstrasse Evangelical Church, 9 Hahnstown Road, Ephrata. The sermon will discuss the trials of the 16th century church.  The service will include special music by guest organist Gene Traas, director of music ministry at Calvary Lutheran Church, Brookfield, Wisconsin.

— St. John’s Lutheran Church, 11 N. Queen St.,  Maytown, will celebrate the 500th anniversary of the  Reformation  with a festival service Sunday,  followed by a German heritage banquet to which the community is invited. The Rev. Robert Lescallette, who recently returned from trip to visit Lutheran sites in Germany, will play the part of Luther. Sunday’s 10:30 a.m. service will feature Luther-themed decor and use  the colonial-era pewter for Holy Communion. Special music will be performed and new members will  join the church. A free-will donation will be asked of the diners  to be used for the  parish’s youth ministry.

— Faith Lutheran Church, 357 Walnut St., Denver, will host a joint worship service with Our Mother of Perpetual Help Roman Catholic Church, Ephrata, at 7 p.m. Monday.   “The purpose of of the service is to show our Christian unity,” said the Rev. Joe Veres, pastor at Faith Lutheran. “We’ll use the words and music from the Roman Catholic Church  for the Canticle of Praise and the Gloria. We jointly planned the service.” The service is open to the public.

— The annual Lutheran-Anglican-Roman Catholic Vespers was held  Sunday at United Lutheran Seminary in Gettysburg. On Monday, the Diocese of Harrisburg hosted the Lutheran-Anglican-Roman Catholic Day of Dialogue at the Cardinal Keeler Center in Harrisburg. The speaker was Bishop Emeritus Donald J. McCoid,  who  played a key role in drafting “Declaration on the Way: Church, Ministry and Eucharist,” which has summarized Lutheran-Catholic dialogue since 1965.

Quote:Oh, boy! The Anglicans are joining in on the fun! It just gets better and better!
May I recommend this prayer from Fr Stedman's Jesus+Mary+Joseph Novena Manual? [Emphasis supplied]

To Our Lady Help of Christians
«for loyalty to Holy Mother Church »
MARY, Immaculate Virgin, Mother of God and our Mother « thou seest how the Catholic Faith is assailed by the devil and the world « that Faith in which we purpose by the help of God, to live and die. To thee we entrust our firm purpose of never joining assemblies of heretics. Do thou, all holy, offer to thy Divine Son our resolutions, and obtain from Him the graces necessary for us to keep them unto the end. Amen. 
Mary, help of Christians, pray for us.


There most certainly is not more that we have in common with Lutherans than what divides us. We have the Real Presence, they do not, even though they believe in some form of it. That is all the difference in the world, as everything we do and are as Catholics is oriented towards our belief in the Real Presence.
I was hoping the new tradition was one of Lutherans returning to the Church en masse.  Man, was I disappointed.
(10-30-2017, 05:51 AM)Jeeter Wrote: [ -> ]I was hoping the new tradition was one of Lutherans returning to the Church en masse.  Man, was I disappointed.

One salient quote belongs on any discussion of this nature:

Pope Pius XI, Mortalium Animos (#10), Jan. 6, 1928: “… the union of Christians can only be promoted by promoting the return to the one true Church of Christ of those who are separated from it…”

And then we have this:

Benedict XVI, Address to Protestants at World Youth Day, August 19, 2005: “And we now ask: What does it mean to restore the unity of all Christians?… This unity, we are convinced, indeed subsists in the Catholic Church, without the possibility of ever being lost (UnitatisRedintegratio, nn. 2, 4, etc.); the Church in fact has not totally disappeared from the world.  On the other hand, this unity does not mean what could be called ecumenism of the return: that is, to deny and to reject one’s own faith history.  Absolutely not!”(L’Osservatore Romano, August 24, 2005, p. 8.)

Unfortunately, this misleading ecumenism that does Protestants no good, goes back further than Francis.
I was listening to Catholic radio this morning and the question of "can we give Luther a break?" came into discussion. Of course, not to my surprise, the answer came out to be "yes."

How about instead of useless ecumenical "dialogue," we get back learning, believing, and practicing our Catholic faith-with its 2,000 year history and all. Catholicism is and will always be more than the fuddy duddy Lutheran "church" will ever be. Perhaps our clergy/hierarchy/papacy should be more focused on saving the souls and shepherding their current flock, especially the lapsed souls who have left the faith and those like me who are struggling with having faith...instead of being focused on supporting sodomy, pleasing SJW politics, and on being social workers.

As a returning Catholic, there is nothing I see in Mr. Luther worthy of emulation; especially his "marriage" and scandal with a consecrated virgin no less.


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(10-29-2017, 04:39 PM)VoxClamantis Wrote: [ -> ]Just in time for the Feast of Christ the King. So much for "Be Thou King of those who are deceived by erroneous opinions, or whom discord keeps aloof, and call them back to the harbor of truth and unity of faith, so that there may be but one flock and one Shepherd."  From Lancaster Online:





At E-town's Christ Lutheran, a new Catholic-Lutheran tradition takes hold
EARLE CORNELIUS | Staff Writer
Oct 28, 2017

Led by the thurifer, the deacon/cantor and three acolytes, the Revs. A.J. Domines, pastor at Christ Lutheran Church, and Steven Fauser, pastor at St. Peter Catholic Church, walked side-by-side down the center aisle of Christ Lutheran in Elizabethtown Wednesday evening.

Outside, the church bells rang, saluting a joint Lutheran-Catholic service that Christ Lutheran historian Phillip P. Clark said had never before  been held in the church that was founded on High Street in 1772.

The idea for the joint service came from Domines, who suggested that a prominent time would be the week leading to the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s “Disputation on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences,”  which ultimately split the Catholic Church and led to the Protestant Reformation.

In his homily, Fauser joked about the date — “That sounds like, uh, a great idea,” he said he told Domines to laughter from the more than 150 people in attendance.

In fact, the idea was not to celebrate what divided the church for nearly five centuries but to share what the two traditions have in common.

Quote:The Church is not divided; She is One. And Holy. And Apostolic. And Catholic.
 
“It’s really not a time to celebrate because whenever there is division or separation, that’s not something to rejoice over,” Fauser said. “But for us to come together, for us to realize how, over these 500 years, what we have done to come together on the Wednesday meeting signifies  something special.”

Noting that the past gives the present its value, Fauser said  the two traditions share a history that, unfortunately, “for 450 years allowed us to be ruled by suspicion, by defensiveness, mutual condemnation, stubbornness, nasty politics and sadly, at times, even war. If anything deserves ... excommunication, it is those things.”

He said there was a time — even in Elizabethtown — when Catholics and Lutherans would not enter each other’s churches.
That changed with the Second Vatican Council in 1965.

Quote:... aaaaaaand there it is. The excuse for everything.
 
“Lutherans and Catholics have made great strides and taken time to learn from our past,” Fauser said. Looking out at the gathering, he  said, “We’ve come a long way.”
 
Quote:What's to learn on our side? The Church's hierarchs cracked down on those who were selling indulgences, so now what's your excuse?
 
Domines said the dialogue was important in bridging the gap that had long ago developed between the  traditions.


Quote:

“It helped us be a bit more liturgical,” he said of the Lutheran Church. “After Vatican II, a lot of Lutheran churches started to go back to weekly communion to emphasize those things that are similar.”

Quote:Read that again. They, the Lutherans, helped US, the Catholics, to be "more liturgical." A sickening commentary on the effects of Vatican II (or interpretations thereof, or its evil "spirit").
 
The worship service was preceded by a dinner in the church’s fellowship hall.

Quote:So they ate before they received Communion (or "communion," as the case may be). Nice.
 
For St. Peter members Frank and Annette Telenko, who had attended funerals at Christ Lutheran in the past, Wednesday’s service was different.

“The whole idea, the whole concept, I thought was really great,” she said. “It’s nice to come to a joyous celebration.”

Quote:
 
Christ Lutheran member Leslie Emrick said she was “excited to see the different churches come together.”

Quote:...'cept one's not a church.
 
The worship service included responses, sung prayers and readings. It concluded with the hymn “The Church’s One Foundation,” which is common to both the Catholic and Protestant churches.

The Rev. Fred Keller, of Lititz, a retired Lutheran pastor who helps at Christ Lutheran, described the service as “a wonderful thing because there is far more that we have in common than there are differences that divide us.”

As Greg Hitz handed church bulletins to attendees, he noted the significance of the occasion.

“It’s a long time coming, don’t you think?”

Quote:Which religious group's next? How's about joining up with some Muslims and going jihading! 
 

Other events

— St. Matthew Lutheran Church,  700 Pleasure Road, will host “Luther and the Reformation” — a one-hour movie hosted by Rick Steves at 3 p.m. today in the church’s fellowship hall. The film is ecumenical in tone. The event is sponsored by St. Matthew Seniors and is open to the public.

— Russ Kuhn will portray Martin Luther and preach the sermon at the 10:30 a.m. service Sunday at Bergstrasse Evangelical Church, 9 Hahnstown Road, Ephrata. The sermon will discuss the trials of the 16th century church.  The service will include special music by guest organist Gene Traas, director of music ministry at Calvary Lutheran Church, Brookfield, Wisconsin.

— St. John’s Lutheran Church, 11 N. Queen St.,  Maytown, will celebrate the 500th anniversary of the  Reformation  with a festival service Sunday,  followed by a German heritage banquet to which the community is invited. The Rev. Robert Lescallette, who recently returned from trip to visit Lutheran sites in Germany, will play the part of Luther. Sunday’s 10:30 a.m. service will feature Luther-themed decor and use  the colonial-era pewter for Holy Communion. Special music will be performed and new members will  join the church. A free-will donation will be asked of the diners  to be used for the  parish’s youth ministry.

— Faith Lutheran Church, 357 Walnut St., Denver, will host a joint worship service with Our Mother of Perpetual Help Roman Catholic Church, Ephrata, at 7 p.m. Monday.   “The purpose of of the service is to show our Christian unity,” said the Rev. Joe Veres, pastor at Faith Lutheran. “We’ll use the words and music from the Roman Catholic Church  for the Canticle of Praise and the Gloria. We jointly planned the service.” The service is open to the public.

— The annual Lutheran-Anglican-Roman Catholic Vespers was held  Sunday at United Lutheran Seminary in Gettysburg. On Monday, the Diocese of Harrisburg hosted the Lutheran-Anglican-Roman Catholic Day of Dialogue at the Cardinal Keeler Center in Harrisburg. The speaker was Bishop Emeritus Donald J. McCoid,  who  played a key role in drafting “Declaration on the Way: Church, Ministry and Eucharist,” which has summarized Lutheran-Catholic dialogue since 1965.

Quote:Oh, boy! The Anglicans are joining in on the fun! It just gets better and better!

 ... Just a humble and "old fashion" in my belief, but to me, it is just more watering down of the "N.O. Mass" (if you can really call it a Mass) ... and that includes some N.O. Priests who are "celebrating the Extra Ordinary Form of the Mass using the post 1965 Vatican approved Missal ... So many of the Rites have been "protestantized" to make them easier for non-Catholics to accept.  My personal feeling is that we need to return to the TLM and end this experiment in the protestant friendly service that is called "Mass" ... and we need to get rid of all the "Liberal Theology" that is destroying the Church as well as the U.S. and Europe (and along with Liberal Theology, "politically correct" everything and more ...
As a former Lutheran, I am deeply offended and incensed at the willful perfidy of our wicked brothers and sisters who persist in this evil. I detest this mockery of the Faith, for it is an injustice to God and to our fellow neighbor!

And Yet, it is also an injustice to Martin Luther. These pathetic nincompoops deny Truth, and deny Martin Luther his right to be rightly judged on his words and actions. Let them speak for himself, the man hated the Catholic Church and the Pope. He was a bitter, angry man, who eventually would turn his hatred from the Romans, against his own peoples.

These fraudulent hucksters dare deny Martin Luther his testimony, in order to replace his image with a facile. Consoling their deceitful consciences with modernist fabrications about how he was "confused" and desired the Truth.


Shame on all of these poor fools, especially the Catholics! Do they not fear God's wrath?

We must pray for them, as well as those poor heretics.
About the Lutherans, St. Teresa of Avila gives us a great blueprint for how we should properly love them.

"At about this time there came to my notice the harm and havoc that were being wrought in France by these Lutherans and the way in which their unhappy sect was increasing. This troubled me very much, and, as though I could do anything, or be of any help in the matter, I wept before the Lord and entreated Him to remedy this great evil. I felt that I would have laid down a thousand lives to save a single one of all the souls that were being lost there." - The Way of Perfection