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Does what the USCCB say about mmigration, gun control, the tax plan, refugees and health care (and whatever topic under the sun) count as "church teachings"?
No. National Bishops Conferences are not magisterial bodies.
(11-09-2017, 10:00 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]No. National Bishops Conferences are not magisterial bodies.

Well how about individual bishops?
(11-09-2017, 09:12 PM)GRA Wrote: [ -> ]Does what the USCCB say about mmigration, gun control, the tax plan, refugees and health care (and whatever topic under the sun) count as "church teachings"?

Absolutely not!
(11-09-2017, 10:41 PM)Credidi Propter Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-09-2017, 09:12 PM)GRA Wrote: [ -> ]Does what the USCCB say about mmigration, gun control, the tax plan, refugees and health care (and whatever topic under the sun) count as "church teachings"?

Absolutely not!

Then what does one do with the "Catholic Social Teaching" on political topics on the USCCB's site?
One reads Rerum Novarum and Quadragesimo Anno to find out what the social teaching' of the Church really is.
IIt seems to me that they don’t constitute Church teaching, but do constitute orders from your bishop. If you are in the United States, your Bishop is a member of the USCCB, and so unless he has explicitly said he disagrees with the USCCB’s position, you can assume he agrees and expects obedience from you.

I personally wish the bishops wouldn’t speak on as many matters as they do, because it creates exactly this situation. But I don’t want to be judged disobedient. If we regard the bishop as Christ, why would we disobey his position on gun control or immigration?

In California, the Bishops urged support for two of the propositions on last year’s ballot. One was to end the death penalty, the other (Prop. 57) was a change in the justice system that (on a pragmatic level) would cause nothing but problems. But being a Catholic and not a consequentialist, I voted as the bishops ordered.

So my answer is that they aren’t Church teaching: the bishops could change their position on gun control tomorrow. But they do merit serious consideration by any Catholic. The opinion of a bishop should take precedence over your own opinion if we take the hierarchy seriously.
@ Opt:

Quote:In California, the Bishops urged support for two of the propositions on last year’s ballot. One was to end the death penalty, the other (Prop. 57) was a change in the justice system that (on a pragmatic level) would cause nothing but problems. But being a Catholic and not a consequentialist, I voted as the bishops ordered.

So you voted anyways out of obedience? That doesn't sit well with me for the sake of "being a Catholic and not a consequentialist."

Quote: But they do merit serious consideration by any Catholic. The opinion of a bishop should take precedence over your own opinion if we take the hierarchy seriously.

Then it's the battle of ideas. Unfortunately there may be many cases were I'll just say, "That's your opinion Mr. Bishop, but I respectfully disagree."
Yes What I mean, GRA, is that the consequences of the proposition passing matter less to me than obedience. I don’t want, at the Final Judgment, for Christ to say “I told you to vote for Prop. 57, and you disobeyed me.”

If the bishops’ opinion is not God’s will, that’s between God and the bishops. It’s our job as Catholics to do as the Church says. I would love to be wrong about this. But I haven’t encountered any official statements or documents saying that I am. If the bishops command sin then we must disobey. But if they command things that are bad ideas but not sinful? I think then we have to realize our place as lay people and bow to the bishops’ authority.
(11-10-2017, 05:20 PM)Optatus Cleary Wrote: [ -> ]Yes What I mean, GRA, is that the consequences of the proposition passing matter less to me than obedience. I don’t want, at the Final Judgment, for Christ to say “I told you to vote for Prop. 57, and you disobeyed me.”

If the bishops’ opinion is not God’s will, that’s between God and the bishops. It’s our job as Catholics to do as the Church says. I would love to be wrong about this. But I haven’t encountered any official statements or documents saying that I am. If the bishops command sin then we must disobey. But if they command things that are bad ideas but not sinful? I think then we have to realize our place as lay people and bow to the bishops’ authority.
So, you voted in opposition to the Church's Infallible Magisterium in obedience to a Bishop who obviously doesn't believe in or accept that Magisterium? Got it!

I highly recommend Galatians 2:11-14, in which St Paul faced down the Pope in a matter of St Peter's personal opinion.

 
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